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Full text of "The harp of freedom"

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in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/harpoffreedomOOclar 




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THE 



HARP OF FREEDOM 



Where is the beauty to see, 

Like the sun-brilliant brow of a nation when free ?— Milton. 




BY 



GEO. W. CLARK 



'Go forth with a trumpet's sound, 
And tell to the nations round — 
On the hills which our heroes trod, 
In the shrines of the saints of God, 
In the ruler's hall and captive's prison, 
That the slumVier is broke, and the sleepers are risen 
That the day of the scourge and the fetter is o'er, 
And earth feels the tread of the Freeman once more.' 



NEW-YOKK: 

MILLER, ORTON & MULLIGAN, 25 PARK ROW. 

BOSTON: J. P. JEWETT & CO. 

AND BY THE AUTHOR, 104 STATE-ST., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

1856. 



£U 









Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1856, by 

GEO. W. CLARK, 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of 
New-York. 



JOHN J. REED, 

PRINTER AND STEREOTYPES, 

16 Spruce-St., N. Y. 



PREFACE 



In presenting to the American people a volume of Poetry and Music adap- 
ted to the great struggle now pending between Freedom and Slavery in this 
country, the author believes he will be rendering to the cause of humanity, a 
timely and efficient service. Music has ever been the faithful hand-maid of 
Liberty, attending and celebrating her triumphal marches, or singing in 
mournful numbers her defeats 

And now. when the spirit of '76 is again abroad — kindling anew in the hearts 
of thousands the determination to stand manfully by the principles of Freedom 
for which our Fore-fathers sacrificed their fortunes and their lives, the emotions 
thus awakened, gush forth as naturally in song, as the morning orisons of the 
Lark, who soars up in the sunshine like a thing of light and melody. 

Who does not desire to see the day, when music of a chaste and elevated style, 
shall go forth with its angel voice, like a spirit of love upon the wind, exerting 
upon all classes of society a pure and healthful moral influence ? When 
its wonderful power over the sentiments and passions, shall be made to 
subserve every righteous cause — to aid every humane effort for the promo- 
tion of man's social, civil and religious well being 1 

That music is capable of accomplishing vast good, and is also a source of the 
most elevated and refined enjoyment, when rightly cultivated and practiced, no 
one who understands its power or has observed its effects, will for a moment deny. 

1 There is a charm — a power that sways the breast, 

Bids every passion revel, or be still : 

Inspires with rage, or all our cares dissolves ; 

Can soothe destruction, and almost soothe despair." 

' Thou, music ! canst assuage the pain and heal the wound 

That hath defied the skill of sager comforters ; 

Thou dost restrain each wild emotion, 

Thou dost the rage of fiercest passions chill, 

Or lightest up the flames of holy fire, 

As through the soul thy strains harmonious thrill ' 

It has been observed by travellers, that after a short residence in almost any 
of the cities of the eastern world, one would fancy " every second person a 



musician." During the night, the streets of these cities, particularly Rome, are 
filled with all sorts of minstrelsy, and the ear is agreeably greeted with a per- 
petual confluence of sweet sounds. A Scotch traveller, in passing through one 
of the most delightful villas of Rome, overheard a stone-mason chanting some- 
thing in a strain of peculiar melancholy ; and on inquiry, ascertained it to be 
the " Lament of Tasso" He soon learned that this celebrated piece was fa- 
miliar to all the common people. Torquato Tasso was an Italian poet of great 
merit, who was for many years deprived of liberty, and subjected to severe 
trials and misfortunes by the jealousy and cruelty of his patron, the Duke of 
Ferrara. That master-piece of music, so justly admired and so much sung by 
the high and low throughout all Italy, had its origin in the wrongs of Tasso. — 
An ardent love of humanity — a deep consciousness of the injustice of slavery — 
its outrages upon human rights, upon free thought, free speech, a free press, 
free soil and free men — a heart full off sympathy for the outraged and down 
trodden, as well as a true and ardent love of Liberty and its blessings, has given 
birth to the poetry comprising this volume. I have long desired to see these 
sentiments of love, and of liberty, of sympathy, of justice and humanity — so 
beautifully expressed in poetic measure, embalmed in sweet and stirring music. 
So that the rich, the poor, the high, the low — the young, the old — who have 
hearts to feel and tongues to move, may sing of the cruel wrongs and outrages 
of Slavery, and the blessings of civil and religious liberty, until every human 
being shall be recognized as " a man and a beothee ;" until the arm of the 
oppressor shall be broken, the all-grasping and tyrannical Slave power de- 
throned, our country redeemed, justice established, and the "blessings of liberty 
secured to us and our posterity." 

The music in this volume is arranged as solos, duetts, trios, quartettes, cho- 
ruses, &c., &c, adapted to use in the domestic circle, the social gathering, the 
school, the club-room, the mass-meeting, and in short, wherever music is loved 
and appreciated — Slavery abhorred, and Liberty held sacred. 

Let singers, having the love of liberty in their hearts, be banded together in 
3lubs in every town, and scatter the "Harp of Freedom" like leaves of the 
forest, from Maine to Kansas, and let the heavens resound with the songs of a 
people 

" Not only free themselves, 
But foremost to make free !" 

Rochester, N. Y., Nov. 1856. 

GEO. W. CLARK. 



THE 



HARP OF FREEDOM 



FLING TO HEAVEN YOUR SIGNAL FIRES ! 

Freedom's light is breaking 

On kindred, tongues, and people, 

Whose slumbering millions at the sight 

In glory and in strength are waking ! whittieti 

Our beacon-fires are lighted 

Refulgent as the sun ! 
On Slavery's servile minions 

Their rays are pouring down. 
The noxious creeds of error, — 

The damning deeds of shame, 
Shall shrink away in terror, 
Before the burning flame ! 

Right onward then victorious 

Bright beacons, onward haste, 
Till Freedom's banner glorious, 
Shall stream o'er every waste ! 

The oligarchs have foundered ! 

The tyrants gasp for breath ; 
Their march shall now be downward 

To the depths of endless death. 
The freemen all united 

In one strong, conquering band 
Shall sweep the despots, frighted, 

From fair Columbia's land. 

Right onward then victorious ! &c. 

Be up ! be firm ! untiring ! 

Strike at the monster's heart ! 
Take thought — take aim — keep firing ! 

He dreads your well-aimed dart. 
Your deeds, we'll pray — God bless them ' — 

Oppression's power to quell : 
Fight nobly, men, for freedom, 
Your country's page shall tell. 

Right onward then victorious ! 

Bright beacons, onward haste, 
Till Freedom's banner glorious ! 
Shall stream o'er every waste. 

g. w. c. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



CLEAR THE WAY. 



Words by Charles Mackey, L. L. D. 



Music by G-. W. C. 



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Lo ! a cloud's about to vanish, 
From the day, from the day ; 

And a brazen wrong to crumble, 
Into clay, into clay. 

Lo ! the right's about to conquer, 

OLEAB THE WAY, CLEAR THE WAY. 

With that right shall many more 
Enter, smiling, at the door ; 
With the giant wrong shall fall 
Many others great and small, 
That for ages long have held u? 

For their prey, for their prey ; 
Men of thought, and men of action, 

CLEAR THE WAY, CLEAR THE WAY. 



THE BREAKING 

By permission of J. H. Hidley, Esq. 

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DAWN. 

Composed by C. M. Traver. 




1. With joy we see the breakiug 

2. O ! 'twas a glori - ous morning 

t. For then shall Freedom's ban - ner 

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morn Now 
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glimm'ring thro' the mis - ty gloom Whose bright un 

this fair land shone Freedom's sun; But bright -er 

yond Co- lum-bia's blood bought shore : And Freedom's 

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- - clouded sua shall light Earth's haughty tyrants to their doom, 
far will be the day Whose breaking morn is now be - gun. 
Star, with brilliant ray, Undimm'd shine on for ev- er - more, 
echo-ing strains proclaim The Earth is on - ly for the Free. 



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4. Then sound the tocsin loud and long, 
Through ev'ry land, o'er isle and sea 
And let its echoing strains proclaim — 
The Earth is only for the Free. 



IIAKT OF FREEDOM. 



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Till-: DAY SPUING BRIGHT. 

Arranged from Pparkling and Bright. 



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Too long hath dearth o'erspread the earth, 
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The morning's golden slumbers, 
Or sadly wear the chains of care, 
That now our thought encumbers ' 
Then sing to night, &c. 



THE DAY OF PROMISE COMES. 

By permission of Horace Waters. Arranged from the Hutchinsons by G. W. 0. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




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HARP OF FREEDOM. 19 



9 N ' er ■ rood hath thfl poof man here. 
To plant with u grata of cm : 
And iicviT a plot where Ub child may cull 
Fresh flowers in the dtwj mom j 

The soil lies fallow, the woods grow rank, 

But idle the poor man stands, 
Ah ! millions of hands want acres, 

And millions of acres want hands. 

4 Tis writ that "ye shall not muzzle the ox 

That treadeth out the corn " 
Yet, behold! ye shackle the poor man's limbs, 

Who hath all Earth's burdens borne. 
The land is the gift of the bounteous God, 

And the labor his word commands ; 
Yet millions of hands want acres, 

And millions of acres want hands. 

5 Who hath ordained that the few shall hoard 

Their millions of useless gold ; 
And rob the earth of its fruits and flowers, 

While profitless soil they hold. 
Who hath ordained that a parchment scroll 

Shall fence around miles of Land ; 
While millions of hands want acres, 

And millions of acres want hands. 

6 'Tis a glaring lie on the face of day, 

'Tis robbery of men's rights : 
'Tis a Lie that the word of the Lord disowns — 

'Tis a curse that burns and blights. 
And 'twill burn and blight 'till the people rise, 

And swear — while they burst their bands — 
That the hands henceforth shall have acres, 

And the acres henceforth have hands. 



20 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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TILL THE LAST CHAIN IS BROKEN. 

Am— The last link is broken. Arranged by G. W. C. 




1. Till the last chain is bro - ken That galls the poor 

2. The slave's cry is unheeded, His deep groans are 



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Then up to the effort! 

Endeavor to save. 
From soul-galling bondage, 

The down-trodd-n slave : 
Afford him the pleasures 

Designed by bis Lord, 
And the richest of treasures 

Shall be thy reward. 

When the last chain is broken 

That galls the poor slave. 
Then the words shall be spoken, 

'•The land of the brave ;" 
For then we'll have freedom, 

And true bravery. 
When the poor slave we've pitied 

And rendered him free. 



24 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



DAY IS BREAKING. 

Words by Rev. Nelson Brown. By permission of J. II. Hildey. Music by T. Wood 




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1. Day is breakiug! day is breaking, Soon will 

2. Day is breaking ! up each sleep-er ! Ho ! to 




3. Hark the shouting ! hark the shouting, hast - en 

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26 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THIS WORLD IS NOT ALL CHEERLESS. 

Words by Emma Garrison. Music by Q. W. C. 




1. This world is not all cheerless, Tho' sometimes dark and 

2. This world is not all cheerless, The heart most lone and 



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BETTER TIMES ARE COMING FRIENDS. 



By permission of Horace Waters. 




Arranged from Dambletnn by G. W. C 

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1. I will not prate of grief and care As 

2. My creed is not so sad as this, Our 

3. Yes, bet - ter times, when ty - rant fight, And 

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dark thoughts of to morrow. Who fain would <v'rv bo-som 
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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




,, com-ing, For er - rors past, to make amends, 




bet - ter times are com-ing, Yes, bet- ter times are 

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31 



ONE HUNDRED YEARS HENCE. 

Wordt altered and adapted from the Ilutcbinsons. Music by G. W. C. 



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hundred years hence what a change will be 

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things snail be altered one hundred years hence, one hundred years 

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3 Oppression and war shall be heard of no more, 
Nor the foot of a slave, leave its print on our shore ; 
Conventions will then be a needless expense, 
For mankind shall be brothers a hundred years hence. 

I Instead of speech making to justify wrong, 
All shall join in the chorus swelling freedoms glad song ; 
The Maine Law shall then be a temperance defense, 
We'll keep time to that music a hundred years hence. 

5 Lying, cheating and fraud, shall be laid on the shelf, 
Men will neither get drunk or be wrapt up in self ; 
But all live together as neighbors and friends, 

Just as good people ought toone hundred years hence. 

6 Then Woman man's equal a partner shall stand, 
And beanty and harmony govern the land ; 

To think for one's self shall not be an offence, 

For the world will be thinking a hundred years hence. 



1IAIM* OF FREEDOM. 



33 



ICY OLD MA SA TELLS HE 

Arranged from Air, Dan.ly ] us, 

Wonls from Fr«d I por. Bj <'r. W, 



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1. Come all ye bond- men far and near, Let's 

2. He telle on nf that glo-i J 

3. And lie Informi us th;it there was A 



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put a Bong in massa'a ear, If is a song for 
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our poor race AYho're whipped and trampled with disgrace. 

li - ber - ty. To save a threepence t;i\ on 

were created. How of- ten have we heard it sta-ted. 



chorus 





My old mas - sa tells me, O, 

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34 



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4. But now we look about and see, 
That we poor blacks are not so free ; 
We're whipped and thrashed about like fools, 
And have no chance at common schools. 



cho. Still my old massa tells me, O, 
This is a land of freedom O ; 
Let's look about and see if 'tis so, 
Just as massa tells us O. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 35 

5. They take our wives, insult and mock, 
And sell our children on the block, 
They choke us if we say a word, 

And say that niggers shant be heard. 

cho. Still my old massa, &c. 

6. Our preachers, too, with whip and cord, 
Command obedience to the Lord ; 
They say they learn it from the book. 
But for ourselves we dare not look. 

cho. My old massa tells me O, 

This is a Christian country O, 
Let's look about and see if 'tis so, 
Just as massa tells me 0. 

7. There is a country far away — 
Friend Hopper says His Canada, 
And if we reach Victoria's shore, 
He says that we are slaves no more. 

cho. Now hasten bondsmen, let us go, 

And leave this Christian country ; 
Haste to the land of the British Queen 
Where whips for negroes are not seen. 

8. Now if we go, we must take the night — 
"We're sure to die if we come in sight — 
The bloodhounds will be on our track, 
And wo to us if they bring us back. 

cho. Now haste all bondmen, let us go, 
And leave this Christian country O ; 
God help us to Victoria's shore, 
Where we are free and slaves no more. 



36 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



HAIL COLUMBIA. 




1. Hail Co - lum - bia, hap - py land ! 

2. Im - mor - tal Pa - triots ! rise once more ! De 






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And when the storm of war was gone, En 
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IIAIJP OF FREEDOM. 



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be our boast, Ev - er mind ful \rliat it cost 
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reach the skies. Firm u - nit - ed let us be. 

bon - dage fail. Firm u - nit - ed, &c. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




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3. 

Sound, sound the trump of fame, 
Let Washington's great name 
:||: Ring through the world with loud applause ! :|J: 
Let every clime, to freedom dear, 
Listen with a joyful ear ; 
With equal skill, with steady power, 
lie governs in the fearful hour 
Of horrid war, or guides with ease, 
The happier time of honest peace. 
Firm united, &c. 

4. 

Behold the chief, who now commands, 
Once more to serve his country, stands, 
:jj: The rock on which the storm will beat ! :J: 
But armed in virtue, firm and true, 
His hopes are fixed on heaven and you ; 
When hope was sinking in dismay, 
When gloom obscured Columbia's day, 
His steady mind, from changes free, 
Resolved on death or Liberty. 
Firm, united, &c. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



HAPPY DAYS ARE COMING RIGHT ALONG." 
Nittie. Arranged and adapted from " Few Days," bj O. W. ('. 




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1. The days are com - ing. hap - py days ; Oom-ing right ft - 

2. The days of pro-gress and re- form are Coming right a 

3. Thus while we sing in Free-doni's praise ; Sing right a ■ 



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long ! Days un 

long I We'll work to 



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them in joy - ful 
darkened by a 
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lays ; The 
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good, good times ! When wrong shall yield to sov-'reign right, 
good, good times ! Peace shall smile up - on our land ; 

good, good times ! When wrong shall yield to sov-'reign right ; 




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Yield right a - long, 
Smile right a - long, 
Yield right a - long, 



And Truth shall join her 

E - ven now 'tis 

And Truth shall join her 



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hand with Might, In the 
close at hand, The 
hand with Might, In the 



good, 


good 


times. 


good, 


good 


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good, 


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By permission of Firth, Pond & Co. 



40 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



CHORUS. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



41 



* J j j »ir r ' r • »»ip- > i 

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days arc near-ing, Hur - ra ! llur - ra I The hap - py 
lays are near-ing, Hur - ra ! llur - ra 

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are near -ing, With the good, good times. 



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STAR SPANGLED BANNER. 

Robert Treat Paine, Jr., 1798. 






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Ye sons of Co 



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42 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 






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na - tion in - crease, With the glo - ry of 



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Rome, and the wis - dom of Greece. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



43 



SOLO. ^_ 

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And ne'er shall the son3 of 
CHORUS. Tenor. 



Co 



lum - bia be slaves, 



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Alto an Octave higher. 

And ne'er shall the sons of 



Co - lum -bia be slaves, 



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While the earth bears a plant, or the sea rolls a wave. 






While the earth bears a plant, or the sea rolls a wave. 



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The fame of our arms, of our laws the mild sway, 

Has justly ennobled our nation in story, 
Till the dark clouds of faction obscured our young day, 
And enveloped the Sun of American glory — 
But let traitors be told, 
"Who their country have sold, 
And bartered their God for his image in gold, 
That ne'er shall, <feo. 



44 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



3. 

Our mountains are crowned -with imperial oak, 

Whose roots, like our liberties, ages have nourished ; 
But long ere our nation submits to the yoke, 

Not a tree shall be left on the field where it flourished. 
Should invasion impend, 
Every grove would descend, 
From the hill-tops they shaded, our shores to defend, 
For ne'er shall the sons, &c. 

4. 

Should the tempest of war overshadow our land, 

Its bolts ne'er could rend Freedom's temple asunder ; 
For, unmoved at its portal, would Washington stand, 

And repulse, with his breast, the assaults of the thunder ! 
His sword from the sleep 
Of its scabbard would leap, 
And conduct with its point every flash to the deep, 
For ne'er shall the sons, &c. 

5. 

Fear nought from without — the whole world may combine, 

In a futile attempt at that temple's o'erthrowing — 
But ah, there's one blemish corroding the shrine, 
Which eats from within, and is ceaselessly growing ; 
Oh check it in time, 
Let it spread not its slime 
O'er the structure which now glitters proudly sublime ; 
And then shall the standard of liberty wave 
O'er a land on whose bosom there breathes not a slave. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



45 




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Be our zeal in heav'n re - cord- ed, With sue - cess on 




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2. May this truth be kept before us, 

God speed the right ! 
Freedom's cause is just and glorious, 

God speed the right 1 
Like the good and great in story, 
If we fail, we fail with glory, 

God speed the right 1 God speed the right ! 

3. Patient, firm and persevering, 

God speed the right ! 
Ne'er the event nor danger fearing, 

God speed the right ! 
Pain, nor toils, nor trials heeding, 
Millions in their chains are bleeding, 

God speed the right ! God speed the right ! 

4. Still our onward course pursuing, 

God speed the right ! 
Freedom's foes at length subduing, 

God speed the right ! 
Truth our cause, whate'er delay it, 
There's no power on earth can stay it ; 

God speed the right ! God speed the right 1 



46 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THERE'S ROOM ENOUGH FOR ALL. 



Words by L. F. Blanchard. 



Music bv G. W. C. 



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J3E._^_- L &-±-0 — & — ^_-L_^_L^ — gf — 9. — m — 



:f: 

1. "What need of all this fuss and strife, Each warring with his 

2. "What if the swarthy peasant find No field for hon- est 

3. From poisoned air ye breathe in courts, And ty-phus tainted 



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bro - ther ? Why need we through the crowd of life Keep 
la - bor ? He need not i - dly stop be - hind, To 
al - leys, Go forth and dwell where health re - sorts, In 




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trampling down each oth - er ? Is there no good that 
thrust a - side his neigh-bor ; There is a land of 
ru - ral hills and val - leys ; Where ev - ery hand that 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



47 







can be won, With-out a squeeze to 
sun - ny 6kies, Which gold for toil is 
clears a bough, Finds plen- ty in at 

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gain it ? 

giv - ing, Where 

ten - dance, And 



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oth - er way of get - ting on, But scrambling to ob 
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ev - ery fur - row of the plow, A step to 

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tain it; Oh! fel - low -men, re - mem-ber then, What 

liv - ing ; Oh ! fel - low - men, re - mem-ber then, What 

- pen - dence, Oh ! hast - en then from fe - vered den, And 



48 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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ev - er chance be - fall — The world is wide in 
ev - er chance be - fall — The world is wide where 
lodg -ing cramped and small — The world is wide in 



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lands be - side, There's room e - nough for all. 
those a - bide, There's room e - nough for all 
lands be - side, There's room e - nough for all. 



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4. 
In this fair region far away, 

Will labor find employment ; 
A fair day's work, a fair day's pay, 

And toil will earn enjoyment. 
What need then of this daily strife, 

Each warring with his brother ! 
Why need we in the crowd of life 

Keep trampling down each other 1 
Oh ! fellow-men, remember then, 

Whatever chance befall, 
The world is wide where those abide, 

There's room enough for all ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



49 



WHILE 'TIS DAY-TIME LET US WORK. 

OR QlARTETTE. 

Con Ammo. liv T. WOOD. Expressly for G. \V. ("lark, Esq. 



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1. Ev - ery mor - tal has Ins mis - sion In 



this 




Life's a bark up - on the o - cean, Tossed and 




world of act - ive strife, Whe - ther in a high po 



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rocked by ev - ery gale : Now scuds on with spee -dy 



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50 



HARP OF FREEDOM, 




— M — «— — « — « — d — a — «!— 



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Life's a bright and sun - ny morn - ing, With some 



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day by day, Shows the mind and spi - rit 



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light re - freshing showers, Fol-lowed by dark cloud-y 



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nARP OF FREEDOM. 



51 



3. 

Life's the cord of silver, bindmg 

Man in contact with his kiii'l ; 
Death is but that bond unwinding, 

Setting free the earth bound mind. 
Life's the pitcher of the fountain, 

Where immortal rills descend; 
'Tis the fragile wheel surmounting 

Cistern where pure waters blend. 



Life's the day and deed for action, 

Death the rest, the time of night, 
He who works with satisfaction, 

Works while yet the hour is light. 
Forward, then ! the day is waving, 

Westward sinks the setting sun ; 
Onward 1 on ! without complaining, 

Work, while yet it may be done. 



FOR FREEDOM, HONOR, AND NATIVE LAND. 




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For free - dom, hon - or, and na - tive land, Each 
The host of the foe he will nev - er fear, When 







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li - ber - ty's sons shall for ev - er 
ru - in shall threat - en a land so 



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stand, 
dear. 

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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




Chorus. 



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All u - nit - ed, un- af - frighted 



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March we on in 
Bound in love to 

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free - dom's cause, 
free - dom's laws ; 

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to free-dom's land. 

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True to free- dom's land, 



True to free-dom's land. 



2. Abuse of power will the free repel, 

The flame of sedition they'll strive to quell ; 
Alike are they friendly to equal rights, 
And hostile to anarchy's deadly blights. 
Cho. — All united, &c. 

3. For equal laws and for Heaven's pure word, 

The hosts of the free have their life's blood poured: 
And never shall freedom's pure spirit die, 
Till earth, under bondage, shall cease to die. 
Cho. — All united, &c. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



53 



FREE KANSAS. 







G. W. C. 



1. Hark ! on the winds we hear 

2. Her pin - ions spread from shore 

3. Shame ! Ruf - fians, shame ! to 

.0. 




to 

to 



cry, To 
shore, Tis 
try to drown With 

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which the heavens and earth re - ply, Our ea - gle, sing - ing 
heard a - bove the o - cean's roar, Now list - en ! would you 
can - non's mu - sic, ev - ery sonnd, As it is ech - oed 



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Up 



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as she flies, "Free, 

hear it more? "Free, 

round and round, "Free. 

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Kan - sas, 
Kan - sas 
Kan - sas 
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54 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



The Northern hills re-echo shame ! 
Though well they know, 'twere more than va* 
To try to still the voice — again, 
"Free Kansas." 

5. 

Wow speed thee on, thou noble bird, 
Till every Freeman brave, has heard 
You sing in loudest tones the words, 
"Free Kansas." 



And let the " Border Ruffians" hear, 
And while they listen, note their fear, 
As whispered round from ear to ear, 
" Free Kansas." 



O WHEN WE GO BACK BAR * 

Parodied and arranged from a Negro Melody, by G. W. C. 



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1. O whar is de spot what we were born on, 
Whar is de spot what we were born on, Whar, O whar is de 



fe=b=f=j3=fr5::B=|z:|zJ-:2z^fi3=I 

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spot we were born on, Way down in de Car-lina state. 



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O when we go back where we were born, We'll 

* Slaves anticipating the day of deliverance from slavery, and their return to 
the loved ones, and loved spot where they were born'. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



65 



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sing our songs both night and morn, Case de day of 






slavery's gone, Way down in de Car - li - na state. 
Chorus. 



O den by and by we do hope to meet urn, 

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By and by we do hope to meet um, By and by we do 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




hope to meet urn, Way down in de Car-li- na state. 






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hope to meet una, Way down in de Car-li- na state. 



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2. 
O thar lives father, and thar lives mother, 
Thar lives sister, and thar lives brother. 
When shall we all meet each other, 

Way down in de Carlina state. 
O when we go back where we were born, 
We'll sing our songs both night and morn, 
Case de day of slavery's gone, 

Way down in de Carlina state. 

Cho. — O, den by and by, &e. 



We'll have de grand times, de best we ever had dere^ 
We'll work no more for de tyrant lords dere, 
We'll work no more for de tyrant lords dere, 

Way down in de Carlina state. 
O, father verry glad when he know dat it be us } 
Mother verry glad too, case she can see us, 
All de Massas goine for to free us, 

Way down in de Carlina state. 

Cho. — O, den by and by, &c. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



57 



THE JOYS OF FREEDOM. 

Arranged and harmonized by G. W. C. 



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1. Mer- ri - ly ev - ery bo - som boundeth, Mer-ri - ly 

■ 3 — is s: t -a 1 P— P— i 

-r- » w — as — us 



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2. Wea-ri - ly ev - ery bo - som pin - etb, Wea-ri - ly 




"Where the song of free - dom 

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Where the chains of slave- : 






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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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pa -rents' smile hath more brightness, There the 

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youthful heart hath more light-ness, Ev - ery joy the home sur- 

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youthful heart hath no glad -ness, Ev - ery flower of life de 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



59 







:^z^z^zfc^z^z±otz^z^z^zzt=ziztzt±?3!± 



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Cheerily then awake the chorus, 

Cheerily ! cheerily ! 
liberty and peace before us, 
Cheerily O, cheerily ! 
Now the parent's smile beams the dearest, 
Now the parent's hopes are the clearest, 
Every joy is now before us, 
Cheerily 0, cheerily ! 
Cheerily, &c. 



HO ! FOR KANSAS. 
Words by Lucy Lakcom. 



Air— Nelly Bly. 



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We will make the "wil - der - ness Bud and bloom a - gain ; 
* By permission of Firth, Pond «fe Co. 



60 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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Bring the sic - kle, speed the plow, Turn the rea - dy soil 






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Free- dom is the no - blest pay For the true man's toil 
Chorus. 




Ho ! bro-thers ! come, brothers ! Hasten all with me ; We'll 



•— *— *— *— *— r T * ~:|:— g— J— gry-I— I 



Ho 1 bro-thers ! come, brothers ! Hasten all with me ; "We'll 

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sing up-on the Kan-sas plains A song of lib - er- ty ! 
sing up-on the Kan-sas plains A song of lib - er- ty I 



a— *-*— a 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 61 



2. Father, haste ! o'er the waste 

Lies a pleasant land, 
There your firesides — altar stones, 

Fixed in truth shall stand ; 
There your sons, brave and good, 

Shall to freemen grow, 
Clad in triple mail of right, 

Wrong to overthrow. 
Ho ! brothers ! come, brothers 1 

Hasten all with me, 
We'll sing, &c. 

3. Mother, come ! here's a home 

In the waiting west, 
Bring the seeds of love and peace, 

You who sow them best ; 
Faithful hearts, holy prayers, 

Keep from taint the air ; 
Soil a mother's tears have wet, 

Golden crops shall bear. 
Come, mother ! fond mother ! 

List, we call to thee, 
We'll sing, <fcc. 

4. Brother brave, stem the wave ! 

Firm the prairies tread ! 
Up the dark Missouri flood 

Be your canvas spread ; 
Sister true, join us, too, 

Where the Kansas flows ; 
Let the northern lily bloom, 

With the southern rose. 
Brave brothers ! true sisters 1 

List ! we call to thee, 
We'll sing, &e. 

5. One and all, hear our call 

Echo through the land ! 
Aid us with a willing heart, 

And the strong right hand ! 
Feed the sparks the pilgrims struck, 

On old Plymouth Rock ! 
To the watch-fires of the free 

Millions glad shall flock. 
Ho ! brothers ! come, brothers ! 

Hasten all with me, 
We'll sing, &c. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



UNCLE TOM'S RELIGION* 

Arranged from C. G. Howard, by G, W. C. 

g„_ r T 9 -^C 1 

a -way from wife and chil-dren, Still I plod my 



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1. Far 






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2. Shall I turn a-gainst my broth - er, Raise the hand of 

p-y — y-f— - — z==a= p — I — ~fi 

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Leav - ing friend - less poor old Tom. Yet with trust and 
m 9 9 J & -+9 # — @—-\^ H — S — *H 



Then we'll get where all 



am free. Pa - tience here, I'll 



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By permission of Horace Waters. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



63 






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faith - ful slave, 



strengtli in hea-ven, I re -main a 

* jfj w _ ™ ^ m i _x 

go to glo - ry, There is com-fort for the slave, 






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When the whip to me am given, I'll think of Him who died to save. 




tVTien the lash makes this flesh gory, I'll pray to Him who died to save. 

~-m — l *■ ■■ m \i-0—*-o-\ — h — i — * d I * * i 



Good-bye, Chloe ! farewell, children 1 

Poor old Tom you'll see no more : 
Mind, be good, and have religion ; 

'Twill bear you to the faithful shore. 
Do not weep, nor feel dejection, — 

Suffering 's over in the grave ; 
But at the glorious resurrection, 

We'll meet with Him who died to save. 



64 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE BULLY BROOKS. HIS CANADA SONG. 
Words by Bryant. Music arranged from " Cork Leg." By G. W. C. 



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1. To Can - a - da Brooks was asked to go, To 



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2. Those Jer - sey railroads I can't a - bide, 'Tis a 



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waste of pow-der a pound or so, 



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no, no, They might 



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t=zf=^zzi=*==t±?— * 



brake-man car - ries 



-- N — N- 
— N — i — 

' :f zz^zzt: 
^ — / 

a knife by his side, They'd 



m 









:t=~ 






HARP OF FREEDOM. 



65 



» ] M si*t] H riJ M r 



take my life on the way, you know, Ri tu di nu di 



=^=^.j_ fc-ft j-i ri rji M r 

z?=*z:*:z:*:z*z±*zz*z:?— *zi*:=:*z^:=< 



cut my throat, and they'd cut it wide, Ri tu di nu di 



%H* : 



■ m m 






li-^zz^zIazz^azz^zF 



nu di na, ri tu di ni nu, ri tu di nu di na. 

•fr* I mi -^fjs-pi-j^ — j. h — r~ri 

@^z:t?z:^=fc?z=z3-Siz^z?z^z±zr=:l 






=z w~w+ \ r\\ r T7TTF 

?zfeztztz^zzi?zi*z^z^z:fzfHztFE 



There are savages haunting New York Bay, 

To murder strangers that pass that way ; 

The Quaker, Garrison, keeps them in pay, 

And they kill at least a score a day. Ri tu di nu, <fcc. 

Beyond New York, in every car, 

They keep a supply of feathers and tar ; 

They daub it on with an iron bar, 

And I should be smothered ere I got far. Ri tu, <fec. 

Those dreadful Yankees talk through the nose ; 

The sound is terrible, goodness knows, 

And when I hear it, a shiver goes 

From the crown of my head to the tip of my toes. Ri tu, <fec 

So, dearest Mr. Burlingame, 

I'll stay at home if 'tis all the same, 

And I'll tell the world 'tis a burning shame 

That we did not fight, and you're to blame. Ri tu, &c, 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE POOR UNHAPPY SLAVE* 
G. W. H. Griffin. Arranged by G, W. C. 







1. 'Tis just one year a - go to - day, That I re-mem-ber 



2. She took my arm, we walked a - long In - to an o - pen 






1 11 f -I^ ^E 



:c 



--j- 



t: 



rpzz^r 



*"—!*» 



I 



•well, 



I sat down by poor Nel - ly's side, And a 



igi ffi^S-Lfefegg 



field, And there she paused to breathe a - while, Then 




=fc^z=gz: zmzzz^zzMz 



'**—**- 



sto 



r: 



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._^_- L. 



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ry she did 



tell: 



'Twas 'bout a poor un 



z»=z« 



to his grave did steal 






* 



She sat down by that 



* By permission of W. Hall & Son. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



67 




u£ 



hap - py slave, That lived for man-y a year ; But 

-« o 9— L # & 9 -& * *Z? # 

lit - tie mound, And soft - ly whis - pered there : " Come 

—& ^~ — 



:= UT* 9 9-9 ®- - 

4 ]\ L fc4^ 






J f r r i f J> 



fctt 



e=i 



now he's dead, and in his grave, "No mas - ter does he 






to me, fa - ther, 'tis thy child !" Then gen- tly dropped a 



^R=3 



p_i# — — ai- 



*-* U II' -t , — |— 






Tenor. 




I 0-^ # tf- 




The poor old slave has gone to rest; "We 

-i h- 

9 9- 

1 1" 



tear. 



The poor old slave has gone to rest; We 



Si 






fc=t= 



i 



68 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



=fi 



@-& — I k-4-i — i 1 — -Li — 0-\ 1 1 

1 £?_- L| 1 ^_±l 1 ^ 1 ^_J_ 



know that be 



free: 




Dis - turb bim not, but 



know that be 



I — frr-f — 5 1 — t~l — f~ X 



free: 



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Dis - turb bim not, but 

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i 



let bim rest, Way down in Ten - nes - see. 




W- 



0L ^ 

i fe» i e* 

let bim rest, "Way down in Ten - nes - see. 



t: 



HUB 



But since tbat time bow thing's have changed ! 

Poor Nelly, that was my bride, 
Is laid beneath the cold grave sod, 

With her father by her side. 
I planted there, upon her grave, 

The weeping willow-tree ; 
I bathed its roots with many a tear, 

That it might shelter me. 

Chorus. The poor old slave, &a. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE STOLEN" BOY. 



> 



:#_qzz_ziq_z_^:qzzz: 
) — ^ ~p~- f — c— g — g ; 






Arranged from S. Lover. 



-0. 

-J- — •— #- 



1. A mother came, when stars were pahng, Wailing out in 



"# 



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4— •H-^ — i — I — U+« — i— » — #-+• — © — i— «— 4- 






ys ^ 



2. " O'er the mountain, thro' the wild wood, Where his childhood 



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ac - cents wild ; Thus she cried, while tears were fall - ing, 



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-9- -*- -«- 9 • -|- -#- -^- • I I 



loved to play ; Where the flowers are fresh -ly springing, 



Szzzizz^zzazz:: 



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zp=ipzqe=p: 

-i 4-1 1 1— 

-|Z 1^ — ^ — \z. 



3 



■#■ 






Call- ing for her sto - len child ; " Why with spell my 

r 1 1 m 1— [-«— 

■+"— &~ ^- X -^— j; :: - 1- 



f-0 4g » » -f- 



^ ^ V- v «r _^_ _ , | 

There I wan- der day by day ; There I wan - der, 



10 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



*=z£=}5=5==#: 



=3=3 



HP- & — I F — 0- 






boy ca - ress - ing, Courting him with fai - ry joy ? 

*— a— " - 1 - 1 — |— *-* * — i 

grow-iag fond-er Of the child that made my joy; 









Why de - stroy 



mo - ther's blessing ? Wherefore steal my 



9 9 -%- -0- ~0- & \ '. fc**» ^ p w 

On the ech - oes wild - ly call - ing To re - store my 



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t=t 



-#- 



:?=t=t 



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ba - by boy ? Why with spell my child de - coy - ing, 



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dar - ling boy ; There I wan - der, grow-ing fond - er 



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w=w=w 

-I 1 1— 

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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



n 




Lur- ing him with gau - dy toys ? Why de - stroy a 

4- 1 -41 y lJ i THE 



— » 

— r 



1- 



-»— -+-« — I — 



Of the child that made my joy 



On the ech - oes 






i! 



1— I — - 



==5z=5=t-^±t=t;-f=:*:E?=t=F-=tt 

mo- ther's bless-ing ? Wherefore steal my ba - by boy ? 
To re - store my sto - len boy. 



wild -ly call - ing To re - store my sto - len boy. 



t==E 



3. 
" But in vain my plaintive calling, 
Tears are falling all in vain ; 
He is gone for ever from me, 
I no more my boy shall see ; 
Fare thee well, my child, for ever I 
In this world I've lost my joy ; 
But in heaven we ne'er shall sever, 
There I'll find my angel boy." 



•72 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THERE'S A GOOD TIME COMING* 

Words by Charles Mackay Arranged by Edward L. White. 




2. There's a good time coming boys, A good time coining, There's a 







zzzzzzizr— — z^ziz^zz^zzzzzzpzzz^z— 
z=^=S^^^±±zzMz=^L±M—Mzzzt* 



ip — - '*- 

lit - tie long-er. "We 



good time com-ing boys, Wait a 



1=?: 



good time com-ing boys, Wait a 



lit - tie long-er. The 



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g2 Szzs — ^ x^ — ^__^ — ^_x^__^ — r: — zi 



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may not live to see the day, But earth shall glisten 



N _ l« 

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^ ^ «** 

pen shall su - per-sede the sword, And right not might shall 



^=p=p=pzlpzzpz:pzr:?zlpz^=pzzp=l 

H 1 1 1 +1 1 1 (*»— H fc — i 1 — + 



By permission of Oliver Ditson. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



13 




the ray, Of the good time com - ing. 

o— I S | S ' i — t-^-g — : — t— I 



in 

-#- 
5 



bo 



the lord, In the 



good time com-ing. 



^z:^=ijBz:^z&=zqzi:az=ii-^y---^=I 

— ^ — I & — &—{ & k*» — I — & — -f 



•#T* 



zzi:£zz£z: 



tzz^=p=?zz0zt*=z pLZ^3^J=d*p=* 



Can - non balls may aid the truth, But thought's a wea-pon 

:#g*z^zz^zza=^z;^=^zz^zz 4 



:wzt& fezz^: 



— i — i — i — i — j -i 1 — i — 

Worth, not birth, shall rule man-kind, And be acknowledged 






ifctzpzi^^z^^zifrfa^zzf^z^zzR:; 
:z?=z^zz^zz^z=^z±^zz^zz^zz:^z: 



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stronger ; We'll win our battle 
tt=f= 



si 



by its aid- 



-I 1 ^!- 

stronger 



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Wait a lit 



tie 



The pro - per impulse has been given 






Wait a lit-tle 




T4 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



■* 



aEHm^E 



3=5«S 



liliHgii 



long-er. Oil ! There's a good time coming, boys, A good time 

\ & v. — ^ *» ^ i I ^ i** ^ *» I r 



^ V. • *» ^ I I W & W * 

long-er. Oh I There's a good time coming, boys, A good time 



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coming, There's a good time coming, boys, Wait a little longer. 




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coming, There's a good time coming, boys, Wait a little longer. 



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•*-i*--' 



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m 



z. 

There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming, 
There's a good time coming, boys, 

Wait a little longer. 
Hateful rivalries of creed, 
Shall not make their martyrs bleed, 

In the good time coming. 
Religion shall be shorn of pride, 

And flourish all the stronger ; 
And charity shall trim her lamp — 

Wait a little longer. Oh ! 
There's a good time coming, boys, <fec. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



75 



4. 
There's a good time coming, boys, 

A good time coming, 
There's a good time coming, boys, 

"Wait a little longer. 
War in all men's eyes shall be 
A monster of iniquity, 

In the good time coming. 
Nations shall not quarrel, then, 

To prove which is the stronger ; 
Nor slaughter men for glory's sake — 

Wait a little longer. Oh ! 
There's a good time coming, boys, &c. 



TO ONE AS WELL AS ANOTHER. 



G. W. C. 



HH 



1. " Keep 




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That the 



I 

1. "Keep 



be - fore the peo - pl< 



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That 



E3 
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FT" ! J JVP^Fyry^TTl^f 




earth was made for man, That the flowers were strown. And the 

— i — # — ^H — — \ — 9\ n — — i — ^ — • — »~^ — 
^ — # — d~r — — — ' — i_ t^ ' 1 — %—ti — 




famine, and crime, and woe, For ever a - bide, Still 



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—b — 9 — m — 9 — I — [ -0— L -y-€»— f # — e — &— - g-H 



^6 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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fruits were grown 

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To bless and never to ban ; 



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side by side, 



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With lux - ury's daz - zling show ; 

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That the sun and rain, And the corn and grain, Are 

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That Laz -arus crawls From 



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Di - ves' halls, And 



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yours and mine, my bro- ther ; Free gift from heaven, And 



starves at his gate, my bro-ther, Yet life was given, By 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



in 



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free - ly given, 



To one as well as an -o - ther, 

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God from heaven, 



To one as "well as an -o - ther, 



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To one as well as an - o - ther. 






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SE 



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I 



({ Keep it before the people," 

That the laborer claims his meed — 
The right of soil, 
And the right to toil, 

From spur and bridle freed ; 
The right to bear, 
And the right to share, 

"With you and me, my brother — 
"Whatever is given 
By God from heaven, 

To one as well as another. 



^3 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



DO GOOD— THERE'S EVER A WAY. 



g. w. c. 



4-»- 



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1. Do 



good, do good, there's ev - er a way, A 



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2. If you've only old clothes, an old bon-net or Bat, A kind 



«zzr?zzzpz=^=rri_z=pzi_e=:f=r^=q5 



■way where there's ev - er 



will 



Don't 

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word, or 



1 
smile true and soft 



In the 






"a — : — ^" 



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wait till 



to - mor - row 



but do 



it to - 

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day, 



1— tj 

name of 



-a — « — * ^ — i4—h -] — H 1 

_h — 5 — 5 — S-«t# — 9 — • — H 

9-±- & a — q — 0. 



a bro - ther con 



fer 



and 



that 



3r===£=35=35=t 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



*9 



Kg — *» — ^ I » — f — — » — »-+ <^ — *— ' — ' r 



i»* ^ •# *» r~ 

And to - day when the mor - row comes still, If you've 

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S 



Shall be count - ed as gold up 

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loft, 



God 



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js LJLjL^g 



1 




mo - ney, you're armed, and ean find work e - nough In 



ear - eth for alL and his glo - ri - ous sun Shines a 



gE— fi-T* 1 1 ft K| 1 =£ ^ ^ H T 
g= — *zz:*zzz*zz.z&zizz*zz: fcfe=*=g=:;]— fcfc| 



53^^ 



;-— ■• — m — 9 | f-h- ^""5 — t 



ev - ery street, al - ley, and lane, If you've 



like 



^ ^ 0,__L_ e --—0 g 

on the rieh and the poor, Be 

-fa fa 1^ -. f> ft*, a 



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80 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 




bread, cast it off, and the wa - ters, tho' rough, 






thou like him, and 



bless ev 



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ery one, 



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sure and re - turn 
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SUM 

gain. 



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And 



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thou'lt be re - ward - ed 






THE FLAG OF OUR UNION FOR EVER !* 
Words by Geo. P. Morris, Esq. Ait. and harmonized by G. W. C 

3 



is 

V l. "A sor 






tz£=8=ff=2= 



— ^ — 1^4- 






song for our ban - ner," the watchword re-call, 
2. What God in his wis - dom and mer - cy de-signed, 






By permission of Wm. Hall & Son. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



81 



— r— sIDL-f > lZI 



5"- 



Which gave the 



sta - tion ; U 

V 



XQ *-- h« — «h — ®—2 — «-v-S-i — I ^ — 



And armed with his weap-on 



of 



thun -der, 



Not 






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&- 



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Bl~:q=FS 



-© — — — #- 

-pi 

■ - nit - ed we stand — di - vid - ed we fall ! It 

— *— *— -*— J— ■ ^- I# — ^— : ^-^ 



#3= 



all the earth's 



and fac - tions combined, Have the 



i-b ^i «?-= — #7 — J — #* 



2-11 



-7- 



itt 



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i=±4 



.0 — 0_i 1_ 

#- L — ^ 



made and preserves us a nation ! The u - nion of lakes, the 




power to con-quer or sun-der 1 The u - nion of lakes, the 

:-=^::t±:^=: 
-P— **-i — i — 



j^ — 1^_ 









"•— r~^- 



82 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 







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u - nion of lands, The u - nion of states none can 



15: 



5~:«=r^:: 



=ps: 






u - nion of lands, The u - nion of states none can 



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EEE 



75 Eg" 



.9— 



F— »—»-*— ^ g I 



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fatz^ *d:«=3fcr:fc:t=E 



The u - nion of hearts, the u - nion of hands, 



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*=* 



H 1 1 — #-|- 



■H h-=~ H-J— 1 



se - ver, 



The u - nion of hearts, the u - nion of hands, 



— fe P — P — -— •-j*— »— »-»— »-f»— 9—0— I — F 




=t 



t 



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e»- 



: i — ~t- 



And the flag of the u - nion for ev - er ; 



The 



3V - er, The 

35E5EE3 



And the flag of the u - nion for ev - er, 



iirprz* 



EEEE?EEE£ES 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



83 



1 c — _k — 2- n: — t tt 



-t fc* — S 



flaj 



of 



the u 



nion for 

r 



ev - er 1 



-ft 1 *-- N- T -^ 1- 

m — a 1 >-+-J— d- 



— tr • s — i ^ — ' » — ; i^"T — r it 



flag 



:bz=rd: 




ROUSE, BROTHERS, AROUSE ! 

By Jenny Marsh Parker. Tune — Flag of our Union. 

1. 

Rouse, brothers, arouse ! and arm for the fight ! 

A darkness broods over our land — 
"Wrong crushes the right, — arm, arm for the fight 1 

For freedom lift up a strong hand. 
For freedom ! for freedom ! hark ! old Bunker Hill 

Echoes back the wild shout that you raise ; 
There our brave fathers sleep, and shall we not keep 

The banner their valor did praise ? 



Rouse, brothers, arouse ! look now at our flag, 

The flag of the free and the brave, 
And see its black stain, — say, shall it remain 

To shadow the land of the slave ? 
That flag is the crown of liberty's height, 

But mark where 'tis trailing to-day ! 
Rouse, brothers, arouse ! and hoist it once more 

Where its stars with the eagle may play. 

3. 

Rouse, brothers, arouse ! the good G-od above 

Will lend his strong arm to the right, 
As he did in the days when Washington prayed, 

Ere trusting his sword in the fight. 
The God of the right will watch o'er the fight ! 

Rouse ! brothers, arouse and go forth, 
And believe that at night the conqueror's might 

Will be with the sons of the North ! 



84 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE BEREAVED MOTHER. 

Words by Jesse Hutchinson. Air, " Kathleen O'Moore." 



I 




5i#=*£^ 



Oh deep was the 

— &_p. 



: *ES 



an - guish of the 

Q. 



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ff t. t-S- t 




fc-£-£ 



4 8 : j J 



slave mother's heart, "When called from her darling for 



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W=P=W- 



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ev - er to part j So grieved that lone mother, that 

-0—0- 



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s 



■& — 1^- 



fc*-j^-p=f-p-p 



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heart broken mother, In sor 



pal 



row and woe. 



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at* 



:prpc 



r=^ 



^=^ 



SHE 



_^__i_ 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 85 



The lash of the master her deep sorrows mock, 
While the child of her bosom is sold on the block ; 
Yet loud shrieked that mother, poor heart broken mother, 
In sorrow and woe. 

The babe in return, for its fond mother cries, 
While the sound of their wailings together arise ; 
They shriek for each other, the child and the mother, 
Li sorrow and woe. 

The harsh auctioneer to sympathy cold, 
Tears the babe from its mother and sells it for gold; 
While the infant and mother, loud shriek for each other, 
In sorrow and woe. 

At last came the parting of mother and child, 
Her brain reeled with madness, that mother was wild ; 
Then the lash could not smother the shrieks of that mothv, 
Of sorrow and woe. 

The child was borne off to a far distant clime, 
While the mother was left in anguish to pine ; 
But reason departed, and she sank broken hearted, 
In sorrow and woe. 

That poor mourning mother, of reason bereft, 
Soon ended her sorrows and sank cold in death : 
Thus died that slave mother, poor heart broken mother, 
In sorrow and woe. 

Oh ! list ye kind mothers to the cries of the slave ; 
The parents and children implore you to save ; 
Go ! rescue the mothers, the sisters and brothers, 
From sorrow and woe. 



86 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



HEARD YE THAT CRY. 

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HARP OF FREEDOM. 87 



The white man oppressed him — the white man for gold, 
Made him toil amidst tortures that cannot be told ; 
He robbed him, and spoiled him, of all that was dear, 
And made him the prey of affliction and fear. 

But his anguish was seen, and his wailings were heard, 
By the Lord God of Hosts ; whose vengeance deferred, 
Gathers force by delay, and with fury will burst, 
On his impious oppressor — the tyrant accurst ! 

Arouse ye, arouse ye ! ye generous and brave, 

Plead the rights of the poor — plead the cause of the s ave; 

Nor cease your exertions till broken shall be 

The fetters that bind him, and the slave shall be free^ 



Sleep on my Child* 



Sleep on, my child, in peaceful rest, 
While lovely visions round thee play ; 
No care or grief has touched thy breast, 
Thy life is yet a cloudless day. 

Far distant is my childhood's home — 
No mother's smiles — no father's care! 
Oh ! how I'd love again to roam, 
Where once my little playmates were ! 

Sleep on, thou hast not felt the chain ; 
But though 'tis yet unmingled joy, 
I may not see those smiles again, 
Nor clasp thee to my breast, my boy. 

And must I see thee toil and bleed ! 
Thy manly soul in fetters tied ; 
'Twill wring thy mother's heart indeed — 
Oh ! would to God that I had died ! 

That soul God's own bright image bears-- 
But oh ! no tongue thy woes can tell ; 
Thy lot is cast in blood and tears, 
And soon these lips must say— farewell ! 



88 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



ZAZA— THE FEMALE SLAVE. 
Words by Miss Ball. 



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Say, fond Znrima, 

Where dost thou stay 1 
Say, doth another 

List to thy sweet lay 7 
Say, doth the orange still 

Bloom near nur cof? 
Zurima, Zurima, 

Am I forgot 1 
O, my country, my country ! how long I for thee, 
Far over the mountain, far over the sea. 

Under the baobab 

Oft have I slept, 
Fanned by sweet breezes 

That over me swept. 
Often in dreams 

Do my weary limbs lay 
'Neath the same baobab, 

Far, far away, 
O my country, my country, how long I for thee, 
Far over the mountain, far over the sea. 

O for the breath 

Of our own waving palm, 
Here, as I languish, 

My spirit to calm — 
O for a draught 

From our own cool-ing lake, 
Brought by sweet mother, 

My spirit to wake. 
O my country, my country, how long I for thee, 
Far over the mountain, far ever the sea. 



90 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



PRAYER FOR THE SLAVE. 

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HARP OF FREEDOM. 91 



The captive exiles make their moans, 

From sin impatient to be free ; 
Call home, call home, thy banished ones ! 

Lead captive their captivity ! 

Out of the deep regard their cries, 
The fallen raise, the mourners cheer, 

Oh, Son of Righteousness, arise, 
And scatter all their doubts and fear. 

Stand by them in the fiery hour, 
Their feebleness of mind defend ; 

And in their weakness show thy power, 
And make them patient to the end. 

Relieve the souls whose cross we bear, 
For whom thy suffering members mourt; 

Answer our faith's effectual prayer; 
And break the yoke so meekly borne ! 



Remembering- that God is just. 

Oh righteous God ! whose awful frown 

Can crumble nations to the dust, 
Trembling we stand before thy throne, 

When we reflect that thou art just. 

Dost thou not see the dreadful wrong, 
Which Afric's injured race sustains 1 

And wilt thou not arise ere long, 

To plead their cause, and break their chains 1 

Must not thine anger quickly rise 
Against the men whom lust controls, 

Who dare thy righteous laws despise 
And traffic in the blood of souls 1 



92 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



NEVER GIVE UP ! 



"Words by Tupper— author of " The Crock of Gold." 
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93 




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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




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95 



THE FUGITIVE. 



Words by L. M C. 



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96 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



I told him he had fled away 

From his kind master, friends, and hcmej 

That he was black — a slave astray, 

And should return as he had come ; 

That I would to his master give 

The straying villain fugitive. 

He fell upon his trembling knee 
And claimed he was a brother man, 
That I was bound to set him free, 
According to the gospel plan ; 
And if I would God's grace receive, 
That I must help the fugitive. 

He showed the stripes his master gave, 
The festering wound — the sightless eye, 
The common badges of the slave, 
And said he would be free, or die ; 
And if I nothing had to give, 
I should not stop the fugitive. 

He owned his was a sable skin, 

That which his Maker first had given; 

But mine would be a darker sin, 

That would exclude my soul from heaven 5 

And if I would God's grace receive, 

I should relieve the fugitive. 

I bowed and took the stranger in, 

And gave him meat, and drink, and res**, 

I hope that God forgave my sin, 

And made me with that brother bles;; 

I am resolved, long as I live, 

To help the panting fugitive. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



97 



AM I NOT A MAN AND BROTHER 7 

Words by A. C. L. Air—" Bride's Farewell.' 



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98 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Am I not a man and brother 1 

Have I not a soul to save 1 
Oh, do not my spirit smother, 

Making me a wretched slave : 
God of mercy, God of mercy, 

Let me fill a freeman's grave ! 

Yes, thou art a man and brother, 

Though thou long hast groaned a slave, 

Bound with cruel cords and tether 
From the cradle to the grave ! 

Yet the Saviour, yet the Saviour, 
Bled and died all souls to save. 

Yes, thou art a man and brother, 
Though we long have told thee nay : 

And are bound to aid each other, 
All along our pilgrim way. 

Come and welcome, come and welcome, 

Join with us to praise and pray ! 

Am I not a Sister J 

by a. c. t. 
Am I not a sister, say 1 

Shall I then be bought and sold 
In the mart and by the way, 

For the white man's lust and gold 1 
Save me then from his foul snare, 
Leave me not to perish there ! 

Am I not a sister say, 

Though I have a sable hue ! 
Lol I have been dragged away, 

From my friends and kindred true. 
And have toiled in yonder field, 
There have long been bruised and peeled » 

Am I not a sister, say % 

Have 1 an immortal soul 1 
Will you, sisters, tell me nay*? 

Shall I live in lust's control, 
To be chattled like a beast, 
By the Christian church and priest 1 

Am I not a sister, say *? 

Though I have been made a slave ? 
Will you not then for me pray, 

To the God whose power can save, 
High and low, and bond and free % 
Toil and pray and vote for me ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



99 



YE HERALDS OF FREEDOM. 

Music by Kingsley. 

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100 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



The finger of slander may now at you point, 
That finger will soon lose the strength of its joint ; 
And those who now plead for the rights of the slave, 
"Will soon be acknowledged the good and the brave. 

Though thrones and dominions, and kingdoms and powers, 
May now all oppose you, the victory is yours ; 
The banner of Jesus will soon be unfurled, 
And he will give freedom and peace to the world. 

Go under his standard and fight by his side, 

O'er mountains and billows you'll then safely ride, 

His gracious protection will be to you given, 

And bright crowns of glory he'll give you in heaven. 



I would not live alway. 

By Pierpont. 

I would not live alway; I ask not to stay, 
Where I must bear the burden and heat of the day : 
"Where my body is cut with the lash or the cord, 
And a hovel and hunger are all my reward. 

I would not live alway, where life is a load 

To the flesh and the spirit : — since there's an abode 

For the soul disenthralled, let me breathe my last breath, 

And repose in thine arms, my deliverer, Death !— 

I would not live alway to toil as a slave : 

Oh no, let me rest, though I rest in my grave ; 

For there, from their troubling, the wicked shall cease, 

And, free from his master, the slave be at peace. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



101 



OUR PILGRIM FATHERS. 

Words by Pierpont. Music from " Minstrel Boy," by G. W. C. 




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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 103 



The mists that wrapped the Pilgrim's sieep, 

Still brood upon the tide ; 
And his rocks yet keep their watch by the deep, 

To stay its waves of pride. 
But the snow-white sail, that she gave to the gale 

When the heavens looked dark, is gone ; 
As an angel's wing, through an opening cloud, 

Is seen, and then withdrawn. 

The Pilgrim exile — sainted name ! 

The hill, whose icy brow 
Rejoiced when he came in the morning's flame, 

In the morning's flame burns now. 
And the moon's cold light, as it lay that night, 

On the hill-side and the sea, 
Still lies where he laid his houseless head; 

But the Pilgrim — where is he 1 

The Pilgrim Fathers are at rest ; 

When Summer's throned on high, 
And the world's warm breast is in verdure dresse 

Go, stand on the hill where they lie. 
The earliest ray of the golden day, 

On that hallowed spot is cast ; 
And the evening sun as he leaves the world, 

Looks kindly on that spot last. 

The Pilgrim spirit has not fled — 

It walks in noon's broad light ; 
And it watches the bed of the glorious dead, 

With the holy stars, by night. 
It watches the bed of the brave who have bled, 

And shall guard this ice-bound shore, 
Till the waves of the bay, where the Mayflower lay, 

Shall foam and freeze no more. 



104 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



STANZAS FOR THE TIMES. 



Words by J. G. Whittier. 



Music by G. W. C. 

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And shall we crouch above these graves, 
With craven soul and fettered lip? 

Yoke in with marked and branded slaves, 
And tremble at the driver's whip 1 

Bend to the earth our pliant knees, 

And speak — but as our masters please 1 



Shall outraged Nature cease to feel 1 
Shall Mercy's tears no longer flow 1 

Shall ruffian threats of cord and steel — 
The dungeon's gloom — th' assassin's blow, 

Turn back the spirit roused to save 

The Truth— our Country— and the Slave 1 



Of human skulls that shrine was made, 
Round which the priests of Mexico 

Before their loathsome idol prayed — 
Is Freedom's altar fashioned so 1 

And must we yield to Freedom's God 

As oifering meet, the negro's blood % 



Shall tongues be mute, when deeds are wrought 
Which well might shame extremest Hell ? 

Shall freemen lock th' indignant thought 1 
Shall Mercy's bosom cease to swell 1 

Shall Honor bleed 1— Shall Truth succumb 1 

Shall pen, and press, and soul be dumb 1 
5* 



106 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



No — by each spot of haunted ground, 

Where Freedom weeps her children's fall- 
By Plymouth's rock — and Bunker's mound — 
By Griswold's stained and shattered wall — 
By Warren's ghost — by Langdon's shade — 
By all the memories of our dead ! 



By their enlarging souls, which burst 
The bands and fetters round them set — 

By the free Pilgrim spirit nursed 
Within our inmost bosoms, yet, — 

By all above — around — below — 

Be ours the indignant answer — no ! 



No — guided by our country's laws, 
For truth, and right, and suffering man, 

Be ours to strive in Freedom's cause, 
As Christians may — as freemen can ! 

Still pouring on unwilling ears 

That truth oppression only fears. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



107 



THE SLAVE'S WAIL. 
Parody by Jesse Hutchinson. Old Air — M Over the mountain. 






1. \ O - ver the mountain and o - ver the 
I The father — the mother — the children, are 
Give us our free - dom — ye friends of E ■ 



moor, 

poor, 

quality, 



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is - no - rant, vile and de - graded, 
children — the young and the aged, 
freedom — ye friends of E - quality, 



deavor, 
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3. ( God in His mercy will crown your en 
I The promise of Jesus to you shall be 
Give us our freedom — ye friends of Hu ■ 



a N N_ pi N F ine 



Comes the sad wailing of many a poor slave 
And they sigh for the day they their freedom shall hav 
Give us our Rights — for we ask rioth - ing more 



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White men have robbed us 

Are scourg'd by the lash of 

Give us our Rights, for 



of all we hold dear 

the rough O - ver - seer 

we ask noth - ing more. 



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The blessings of Hea - ven shall be your re - ward, } 
En - ter, ye faith - ful, the joy of your Lord, y 
Give us our Rights, for we ask noth - ing more. 



108 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 




m 



Pi - ty, oh pi - ty, ye friends of Hu - man - i - ty, 
Pi - ty, oh pi - ty, ye friends of Hu - man - i - ty, 
Pi - ty, oh pi - ty, ye friends of Christian - i - ty, 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



109 



TO THOSE I LOVE. 

Words ky Miss E. M. Chandler. Music from an old air by G. W. C. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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I turn to you to share my joy, — to soothe me in my grief — 
In wayward sadness from your smiles, I seek a sweet relief: 
And shall I keep this burning wish to see the slave set free, 
Locked darkly in my secret heart, unshared and silently % 

If I had been a friendless thing — if I had never known, 
How swell the fountains of the heart benea;h affection's tone, 
I might have, careless, seen the leaf torn rudely from its stem, 
But clinging as I do to you, can I but feel for them 1 

I could not brook to list the sad sweet music of a bird, 
Though it were sweeter melody than ever ear hath heard, 
If cruel hands had quenched its light, ihat in the plaintive song, 
It might the breathing memory of other days prolong. 

And can I give my lip to taste the life-bought luxuries, wrung 
From those on whom a darker night of anguish has been flung— 
Or silently and selfishly enjoy my better lot, 
While those whom God hath bade me love, are wretched and forgot? 

Oh no ! — so blame me not, sweet friends, though I should some- 
times seem 
Too much to press upon your ear an oft repeated theme; 
The story of the negro's wrongs hath won me from my rest, — 
And I must strive to wake for him an interest in your breast ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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ROUSE UP, NEW ENGLAND. 

Words by a Yankee. Music by G. W. C. 



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More slave States added at a breath ! One flourish of a pen, 
And fetters shall be rivited on millions more of men ! 
One drop of ink to sign a name, and slavery shall find 
For all her surplus flesh and blood, a market to her mind ! 

A market where good Democrats their fellow men may sell ! 
O, what a grin of fiendish glee runs round and round thro' hell ! 
How all the damned leap up for joy and half forget their fire, 
To think men take such pains to claim the notice of God's ire. 

Is't not enough that we have borne the sneer of all the world, 
And bent to those whose haughty lips in scorn of us are curled 1 
Is't not enough that we must hunt their living chattels back, 
And cheer the hungry bloodhounds on, that howl upon their track 1 



Is't not enough that we must bow to all that they decree,- 
These cotton and tobacco lords, these pimps of slavery ? 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 113 



That we must yield our conscience up to glut Oppression's maw, 
And break our faith with God to keep the letter of Man's law? 

But must we sit in silence by, and see the chain and whip 
Made firmer for all time to come in Slavery's bloody grip ! 
Must we not only half the guilt and all the shame endure, 
But help to make our tyrant's throne of flesh and blood secure 1 

Is water running in our veins 1 Do we remember still 
Old Plymouth rock, and Lexington, and glorious Bunker Hill? 
The debt we owe our Father's graves'? and to the yet unborn, 
Whose heritage ourselves must make a thing of pride or scorn 1 

Grey Plymouth rock hath yet a tongue, and Concord is not dumb, 
And voices from our father's graves, and from the future come ; 
They call on us to stand our ground, they charge us still to be 
Not only free from chains ourselves, but foremost to make free ! 

Awake, New England ! "While you sleep the foes advance their 

lines; 
Already on your stronghold's wall their bloody banner shines; 
Awake ! and hurl them back again in terror and despair, 
The time has come for earnest deeds, we've not a man to spare. 



114 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



RISE, FREEMEN, RISK 



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Rise, free the slave ; oh, burst his 
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And cast his fetters down ; 
Let virtue be your country's pride, 

Her diadem and crown. 

Then shall the day at length arrive, 
When all shall equal be, 

And Freedom's banner, waving 
high, 
Proclaim that all are free. 

Remember Me. 

O Thou, from whom all goodness 
flows ! 
I lift my heart to thee ; 



In all my wrongs, oppressions, 
woes, 
Dear Lord ! remember me. 

Afflictions sore obstruct my way, 

And ills I cannot flee ; 
Lord! let my strength be as my 
day, 

And still remember me. 

Oppressed with scourges, bonds, 
and grief, 

This feeble body see ; 
Oh ! give my burdened soul relief, 

Hear, and remember me. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



115 



C. S. Weyman. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




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March ! we have sworn to support her ; 
The prayers of the righteous shall speed us ; 
A chief never conquered shall lead us 
Right on to Victory! 
Then from those fields, red with slaughter, 
Slavery's hordes shall be driven, 
Freedom to Kansas be given, 

"We 're bound to make her free ! 
Hurrah ! 
To Kansas shall Freedom be given ; 
A glorious Victory ! 



HARP OF rRKEDOM. 



117 



VOICE OF NEW ENGLAND 



Words by Whittier. 



Music by G. W. C. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




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It is coming — it is nigh ! 
Stand your homes and altars by ; 
On your own free threshholds die. 
Clang the bells in all your spires ; 
On the gray hills of your sires 
Fling to heaven your signal fires. 

Whoso shrinks or falters now, 
Whoso to the yoke would bow, 
Brand the craven on his brow. 
Freedom's soil hath only place 
For a free and fearless race — 
None for traitors false and base. 

Take your land of sun and bloom ; 
Only leave to Freedom room 
For her plough, and forge, and 

loom. 
Take your slavery-blackened 

vales ; 
Leave us but our own free gales, 
Blowing on our thousand sails. 

Onward with your fell design ; 
Dig the gulf and draw the line ; 
Fire beneath vour feet the mine : 



Deeply, when the wide abyss 
Yawns between your land and this, 
Shall ye feel your helplessness. 

By the hearth, and in the bed, 
Shaken by a look or tread, 
Ye shall own a guilty dread. 
And the cur.>e of unpaid toil, 
Downward through your generous 

soil, 
Like a fire shall burn and spoil. 

Our bleak hills shall bud and blow, 
Vines our rocks shall overgrow, 
Plenty in our valleys flow; — 
And when vengeance clouds your 

skies, 
Hither shall ye turn your eyes, 
As the damned on Paradise ! 

We but ask our rocky strand, 
Freedom's true and brother band, 
Freedom's strong and honest nand, 
Valleys by the slave untrod, 
And the Pilgrim's mountain sod, 
Blessed of our fathers' God ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



119 



OUR COUNTRYMEN IN CHAINS. 

Words by Whittier. "Beatitude," by T. Hastings. 



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120 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



By storied Mil and hallow'd grot, 

By mossy wood and marshy glen, 
Whence rang of old the rifle-shot, 

And hurrying shout of Marion's men ! 
The groan of breaking hearts is there — 

The falling lash — the fetter's clank ! 
Slaves — slaves are breathing in that air, 

Which old De Kalb and Sumter drank ! 



What, ho ! — our countrymen in chains ! 

The whip on woman's shrinking flesh ! 
Our soil yet reddening with the stains, 

Caught from her scourging, warm and 
fresh ! 
What ! mothers from their children riven ! 

What! God's own image bought and 
sold! 
Americans to market driven, 

And barter'd as the brute for gold ! 

Speak ! shall their agony of prayer 

Come thrilling to our hearts in vain ? 
To us, whose fathers scorn'd to bear 

The paltry menace of a chain ; 
To us, whose boast is loud and long 

Of holy Liberty and Light — 
Say, shall these writhing slaves of Wrong, 

Plead vainly for their plunder'd Right ? 

Shall every flap of England's flag 

Proclaim that all around are free, 
From " farthest Ind" to each blue crag 

That beetles o'er the Western Sea ? 
And shall we scoff at Europe's kings, 

When Freedom's fire is dim with us, 
And round our country's altar clings 

The damning shade of Slavery's curse? 

Just God ! and shall we calmly rest, 

The Christian's scorn — the" Heathen's 
mirth — 
Content to live the lingering jest 

And by-word of a mocking Earth ? 
Shall our own glorious land retain 

That curse which Europe scorns to 
bear? 
Shall our own brethren drag the chain 

Which not even Russia's menials wear? 

Down let the shrine of Moloch sink, 
And leave no tra ces where it stood ; 



No longer let its idol drink 
His daily cup of human blood : 

But rear another altar there, 
To Truth, and Love, and Mercy given, 

And Freedom's gift, and Freedom's prayer 
Shall call an answer down from Heaven! 



Myron ttolley. 



BY W. H. BURLEIGH. 

Yes— fame is his :— but not the fame 

For which the conqueror pants and 
strives, 
Whose path is tracked through blood and 
flame, 

And over countless human lives ! 
His name no armed battalions hail 

With bugle shriek or thundering gun- 
No widows curse him, as they wail 

For slaughtered husband and for son 



Amid the moral strife alone, 

He battled fearlessly and long, 
And poured, with clear, untrembling tone, 

Rebuke upon the hosts of Wrong — 
To break Oppression's cruel rod, 

He dared the perils of the fight, 
And in the name of Freedom's God 

Struck boldly for the True and Right ! 



With faith, whose eye was never dim, 

The triumph, yet afar, he saw, 
When, bonds smote off from soul and limb, 

And freed alike by Love and Law. 
The slave — no more a slave — shall stand 

Erect — and loud, from sea to sea, 
Exultant burst o'er all the land 

The glorious song of jubilee ! 

Why should we mourn, thy labor done, 

That thou art called to thy reward ; 
Rest, Freedom's war-worn champion ! 

Rest, faithful soldier of the Lord ! 
For oh, not vainly hast thou striven, 

Through storm, and gloom, and deepest 
night — 
Not vainly hath thy life been given 

For God, for Freedom, and for Right. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



121 



THE MAN FOR MR 

Air, " The Rose that all are praising. 



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He's not at all the man for me, 

"Who sells a man for gain, 
Who bends the pliant servile knee, 

To Slavery's God of shame ! 
But he whose God-like form erect 

Proclaims that all alike are free 
To think, and speak, and vote, and act, 

Oh that's the man for me. 

He sure is not the man for me 
Whose spirit will succumb, 

When men endowed with Liberty- 
Lie bleeding, bound and dumb ; 

But he whose faithful words of might 
Ring through the land from shore t.) sea, 

For man's eternal equal right, 
Oh that's the man for me. 



No, no, he's not the man for me 

Whose voice o'er hill and plain, 
Breaks forth for glorious liberty, 

But binds himself, the chain ! 
The mightiest of the noble band 

Who prays and toils the world to free, 
With head, and heart, and voice, and vote- 

Oh that's the man for me. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



123 



PILGRIM SONG. 
Words by Geo. Lunt. 



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Hith-er we come; Where the free dare to be, This is our home 



England hath sunny dales, 

Dearly they bloom ; 
Scotia hath heather-hills, 

Sweet their perfume : 
Yet through the wilderness 

Cheerful we stray, 
Native land, native land — 

Home far away ! 
Pilgrims, &c. 



124 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Dim grew the forest path, 

Onward they trod : 
Firm beat their noble hearts, 

Trusting in God ! 
Gray men and blooming maids, 

High rose their song — 
Hear it sweep, clear and deep 

Ever along! 

Pilgrims, &c. 

Not their's the glory-wreath, 

Torn by the blast ; 
Heavenward their holy steps, 

Heavenward they passed ! 
Green be their mossy graves ! 

Ours be their fame, 
While their song peals along, 

Ever the same ! 
Pilgrims, &c. 

The Bondman. 

FROM THE LIBERATOR. 

Feebly the bondman toiled, 

Sadly he wept — 
Then to his wretched cot 

Mournfully crept : 
How doth his free-born soul 

Pine 'neath his shain ! 



Slavery ! Slavery ! 
Dark is thy reign. 

Long ere the break of day, 

Roused from repose, 
Wearily toiling 

Till after its close — 
Praying for freedom, 

He spends his last breath: 
Liberty ! Liberty ! 

Give me, or death. 

When, when, oh Lord ! will righl 

Triumph o'er wrong % 
Tyrants oppress the weak, 

Oh Lord ! how long 1 
Hark ! hark ! a peal resounds 

From shore to shore — 
Tyranny ! Tyranny ! 

Thy reign is o'er. 

E'en now the morning 

Gleams from the East — 
Despots are feeling 

Their triumph is past- 
Strong hearts are answering 

To freedom's loud call — 
Liberty ! Liberty ! 

Full and for all. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



125 



FOURTH OF JULY. 
Words by Mrs. Sigourney. Music by G. W. C. 



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126 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Suns bless our harvests fair. 

With fervid smile serene, 
But a dark shade is gathering there, 

What can its blackness mean *? 

We have a birth-right proud, 
For our young sons to claim— 

An eagle soaring o'er the cloud, 
In freedom and in fame. 

We have a scutcheon bright, 
By our dead fathers bought; 

A fearful blot distains its white — 
Who hath such evil wrought! 

Our banner o'er the sea 

Looks forth with starry eye, 

Emblazoned glorious, bold and free, 
A letter on the sky — 

What hand with shameful stain, 
Hath marred its heavenly blue 1 

The yoke, the fasces, and the chain, 
Say, are these emblems true ? 

This day doth music rare 

Swell through our nation's bound, 
But Afric's wailing mingles there, 

And Heaven doth hear the sound. 

O God of power ! we turn 
In penitence to thee, 

Bid our loved land the lesson learn- 
To bid the slave be free. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



127 



YE SPIRITS OF THE FREE. 

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They shut the sti - fled groan, And bit - ter prayer 1 



128 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Shall he a slave be bound, 
Whom God hath doubly crowned 

Creation's lord 1 
Shall men of Christian name, 
"Without a blush of shame, 
Profess their tyrant claim 

From God's own word 1 

No ! at the battle cry, 
A host prepared to die, 

Shall arm for fight — 
But not with martial steel, 
Grasped with a murderous zeal; 
No arms their foes shall feel, 



Firm on Jehovah's laws, 
Strong in their righteous cause, 

They march to save. 
And vain the tyrant's mail, 
Against their battle-hail, 
Till cease the woe and wail 

Of tortured slave ! 



Sing: Me a Triumph Song-. 

Sing me a triumph song, 
Roll the glad notes along, 

Great God, to thee ! 
Thine be the glory bright, 
Source of all power and might ! 
For thou hast said, in might, 

Man shall be free. 

Sing me a triumph song, 
Let all the sound prolong, 

Air, earth, and sea, 
Down falls the tyrant's power, 
See his dread minions cower ; 
Now, from this glorious hour, 

Man will be free. 

Sing me a triumph song, 
Sing in the mighty throng, 

Sing Jubilee ! 
Let the broad welkin ring, 
While to heaven's mighty King, 
Honor and praise we sing, 

For man is free. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



129 



WAKE, SONS OF THE PILGRIMS. 



Air—" IPGregOf'l Gathering.' 



Wake sons of the Pilgrims, and look to your right ! The 

des - pots of Slav - 'ry are up in their might ; In- 

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dulge not in sleep, it's like dig-ging the graves Of 




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blood-purchased freedom — 'tis yield-ing like slaves. Then 

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hal- loo, halloo hal-loo to the contest, 



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130 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 





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Wake, Sons of the Pilgrims ! why slumber ye on! 

Your chains are now forging, your fetters are done ; 

Oh! sleep not, like Samson, on Slavery's foul arm, 

For, Delilah-like, she's now planning your harm. 

Then halloo, halloo, halloo, to the contest ! 

Awake from your sleeping — nor slumber again, 

Once bound in your fetters, you'll struggle in vain ; 

Then rally, rally, rally, rally, rally, rally — 

While your eye-balls may move, O wake up now, or never—' 

Wake, freemen ! awake, or you're ruined forever! 

Yes, freemen are waking ! we fling to the breeze, 

The bright flag of freedom, the banner of Peace ; 

The slave long forgotten, forlorn, and alone, 

We hail as a brother — our own mother's son ! 

Then halloo, halloo, halloo, to the contest ! 

For freedom we rally — for freedom to all — 

To rescue the slave, and ourselves too from thrall. 

We rally, rally, rally, rally, rally, rally — 

While a slave shall remain, bound, the weak by the stronger, 

We will never disband, but strive harder and longer 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



131 



COME, JOIN THE FRIENDS OF LIBERTY. 

Air — " When I can read my title clear." 

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132 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 




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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



133 



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off 'rings bring, When all mankind are free. 



off 'rings bring, When all mankind are free. 



Come, join the friends of liberty, 

Ye dames and maidens fair ; 
And breathe around us in our path, 

Affection's hallowed air. 
O that will be joyful, joyful, joyful, 
O that will be joyful, 
When woman cheers us on, 
When woman cheers us on, 
When woman cheers us on, 
To conquests not yet won ; 
'Tis then we'll sing, and offerings 

bring, 
When woman cheers us on. 



Come join the friends of liberty, 
Ye sons and daughters all, 

Of this our own America ; 
Come at the friendly call. 

O that will be joyful, joyful, joyful, 

O that will be joyful, 

When all shall proudly say, 

This, this is freedom's day, 

Oppression flee away ! 

'Tis then we'll sing and offerings 
bring, 

When Freedom wins the day. 



134 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



WE ARE COME ; ALL COME. 



By G. W. C. 







We are come, all come, with the crowded throng, To 

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hill and plain, Spreads grief and woe in his hor - rid train. 

We are come, all come, a determined band, 

To rescue the slave from the tyrants hand ; 

And our prayers shall ascend with our songs to Him 

Who sits in the midst of the cherubim. 

We are come, all come, in the strength of youth, 
In the light of hope and the power of truth ; 
And we joy to see in our ranks to-day, 
The honored locks of the good and grey. 

We are come, all come, in our holy might. 
And freedom's foes shall be put to flight; 
Oh God ! with favoring smiles from thee, 
Our songs shall soon chant the victors 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



135 



THE LAW OF LOVE 



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Words by a Lady 

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Music by G. W. C. 



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He spreads his kind supporting arms, 

To every child of grief; 
His secret bounty largely flows, 

And brings unasked relief. 

To gentle offices of love 

His feet are never slow ; 
He views, through mercy's melting eye, 

A brother in his foe. 

To him protection shall be shown, 

And mercy from above 
Descend on those, who thus fulfil 

The perfect law of love. 

Oh! Charity! 

Oh charity ! thou heavenly grace, 

All tender, soft, and kind, 
A friend to all the human race, 

To all that's good inclined. 

The man of charity extends 

To all his helping hand ; 
His kindred, neighbors, foes, and friends, 

His pity may command. 

The sick, the prisoner, deaf, and blind, 

And all the sons of grief, 
In him a benefactor find ; 

He loves to give relief. 

'Tis love that makes religion sweet 
'Tis love that makes us rise, 

With willing minds, and ardent feet. 
To yonder happy skies. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



137 



THE MERCY SEAT. 

Words by Mrs. Sigourney. Music by C. W. C. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




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There is a spot where spirits blend, 
Where friend holds fellowship with friend ; 
Though sundered far, by faith we meet, 
Around one common Mercy-Seat. 

Ah ! whither could we flee for aid, 

When hunted, scourged, oppressed, dismay ed,- 

Or how our bloody foes defeat, 

Had suffering slaves no Mercy-Seat ! 

Oh ! let these hands forget their skill, 
These tongues be silent, cold, and still, 
These throbbing hearts, forget to beat, 
If we forget the" Mercy-Seat. 

Friend of the Friendless. 

God of my life ! to thee I call, 
Afflicted at thy feet I fall ; 
When the great water-floods prevail, 
Leave not my trembling heart to fail. 

Friend of the friendless and the faint ! 
Where should I lodge my deep complaint? 
Where but with thee, whose open door 
Invites the helpless and the poor 1 

Did ever mourner plead with thee, 
And thou refuse that mourner's plea? 
Does not thy word still fixed remain, 
That none shall seek thy face in vain ? 

Poor though I am, despised, forgot, 
Yet God, my God forgets me not ; 
And he is safe, he must succeed, 
For vhom the Lord vouchsafes to plea<f. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



139 



WAKE YE NUMBERS ! 

Words by Lewis. Air, " Strike the Cymbals. 







"Wake ye num-bers ! 
Flaers are wav-in?, 



ts 

from your slum-bers, 
all ty - rants brav-ing, 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




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Daily, nightly, burning brightly, 

Glory's pillar fills the air; 
Hearts are waking, chains are breaking, 

Freedom bids her sons prepare : 
O'er the ocean, in proud devotion, 

Incense rises to the skies ; 
Prom our mountains, o'er our fountains, 

See, our Eagle proudly flies ! 
What deploring impedes his soaring 1 

Millions still in bondage sighing i 

Long in deep oppression lying ! 
Shall their story mar our glory 1 

Mast their life in sorrow flow 1 
Tears are falling ! fetters galling ! 

Listen to the cry of woe ! 
Ctill oppressing ! never blessing ! 

Shall their grief no ending knowl 
Yes ! our nation yet shall feel ; 
Time shall break the chain of steel; 
Then the slave shall nobly stand; 
Peace shall smile with lustre bland; 
Glory shall crown our happy land- 
Forever. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



143 



COMFORT FOR THE BONDMAN. 

Air — " Indian Philosopher." 



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144 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Beyond the bounds of time and space, 
Look forward to that heavenly place, 

Which mortals never trod; 
On faith's strong eagle pinions rise, 
Work out your passage to the skies, 

And scale the mount of God. 

If. like our Lord, we suffer here, 
We shall before his face appear, 

And at his side sit down ; 
To patient faith the prize is sure, 
For all who to the end endure 

Shall wear a glorious crown. 

Thrice blessed, exalted, blissful hope ! 
It lifts our fainting spirits up, 

It brings to life the dead ; 
Our bondage here will soon be past, 
Then we shall rise and reign at last, 

Triumphant with our Head. 

Come and see the "Works of Godo 

Lift up to God the shout of joy, 
Let all the earth its powers employ, 

To sound his glorious praise ; 
Say, unto God— w How great art thou ! 
Thy foes before thy presence bow ! 

How gracious are thy ways !" 

To thee all lands their homage bring, 
They raise the song, they shout, they sing 

The honors of thy name." 
Come ! see the wondrous works of God ; 
How dreadful is his vengeful rod ! 

How wide extends his fame ! 

He made a highway through the sea, 
His people, long-enslaved, to free, 

And give them Canaan's land ; 
Through endless years his reign extends, 
His piercing eye to earth he bends — 

Ye despots ! fear his hand. 

O ! bless our God, lift up your voice 
Ye people ! sing aloud — rejoice — 

His mighty praise declare ; 
The Lord hath made our bondage cease, 
Broke off our chains, brought sure release^ 

And turned to praise our prayer. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



145 



HARK ! A VOICE FROM HEAVEN. 

Words by Oliver Johnson. Music — " Zion." 

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See, the light of truth is breaking 
Full and clear on every hand; 

And the voice of mercy speaking, 
Now is heard through ail the land : 

Firm and fearless, 
See the friends of freedom stand, 

Lo ! the nation is arousing 
From its slumber long and deep ; 

And the friends of God are waking, 
Never, never more to sleep, 

While a bondman, 
In his chains remains to weep. 

Long, too long, have we been dreaming 
O'er our country's sin and shame : 

Let us now, the time redeeming, 
Press the helpless captive's claim- 
Till exulting, 
He shall cast aside his chain. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



147 



THE PLEASANT LAND WE LOVE. 

Words by N. P. Willis. Air, Carrier Dove. 



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149 



And we are free — but is there not 

One blot upon our name ? 
Is our proud record written fair 

Upon the scroll of fame 1 
Our banner floateth by the shore, 

Our flag upon the sea ; 
But when the fettered slave is loosed, 

We shall be truly free ! 



The Freed Slave. 

Yet once again, once more again, 

My bark bounds o'er the wave ; 
They know not, who ne'er clanked the 
chain, 

What 'tis to be a slave : 
To sit alone, beside the wood, 

And gaze upon the sky : 
This may, indeed, be solitude, 

But 'tis not slavery. 

Fatigued with labor's noontide task, 

To sigh in vain for sleep ; 
Or faintly smile, our griefs to mask, 

When 't would be joy to weep ; 
To court the shade of leafy bower, 

Thirst for the freeborn wave, 
But to obtain denied the power — 

This is to be a slave ! 

Son of the sword ! on honor's field 

'Tis thine to find a grave ; 
Yet, when from life's worst ill 'twould 
shield, 

It comes not to the slave. 
The lightsome to the heavy heart, 

The laugh changed to the sigh ; 



To live from all we love apart— 
Oh ! this is slavery. 

Tlie Flag of the Free. 

By G. W. C. 

Fling abroad its folds to the cooling breeze, 

Let it float at the mast-head high ; 
And gather around, all hearts resolved, 

To sustain it there or die : 
An emblem of peace and hope to the 
world, 

Unstained let it ever be ; 
And say to the world, where'er it waves, 

Our flag is the flag of the free ! 

That banner proclaims to the listening 
earth, 
That the reign of base tyrants is o'er, 
The galling chain of the cruel lord, 
Shall enslave mankind no more : 
An emblem of hope to the poor and 
crushed, 
O place it where all may see ; 
And shout with glad voice as you raise it 
high, 
Our flag is the flag of the free ! 

Then on high, on high let that bannei 
wave, 

And lead us the foe to meet, 
Let it float in triumph o'er our heads, 

Or be our winding sheet : 
And never, oh, never be it furled, 

'Till it wave o'er earth and sea ; 
And all mankind shall swell the shout 

Our flag is the flag of the free. 



150 



HAEP OF FREEDOM. 



MARCH TO THE BATTLEFIELD. 

G. W. C. Air " Oft in the stilly night' 





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"Who for his country brave, 

Would fly from her invader ? 
"Who his base life to save 

Would traitor like degrade her ? 
Our hallowed cause — 

Our homes and laws, 
'Gainst tyrant hosts sustaining, 

We'll win a crown of bright renown, 
Or die, man's rights maintaining, 
March to the battlefield, &c. 



Oft in the Chilly Night * 

BY PIERPONT. 

Oft in the chilly night, 

Ere slumber's chain has bound me, 
When all her silvery light 

The moon is pouring round me, 
Beneath its ray I kneel and pray 

That God would give some token 
That slavery's chains on Southern plains, 

Shall all ere long be broken : 
Yes, in the chilly night, 

Though slavery's chain has bound me, 
Kneel I, and feel the might 

Of God's right arm around me. 

When at the driver's call, 

In cold or sultry weather, 
We slaves, both great and small, 

Turn out to toil together, 
I feel like one from whom the sun 

Of hope has long departed ; 
And morning's light, and weary night, 

Still find me broken hearted: 
Thus, when the chilly breath 

Of night is sighing round me, 
Kneel I, and wish that death 

In his cold chain had bound me. 



IIARP OF FREEDOM. 



153 



SONG OF THE FREE. 
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HARP OF FREEDOM. 155 



And who through our nation is waging the fight 1 
What ho^t from the battle is flying 1 

Our true hearted freemen maintain Ihe right, 
And ihe monster oppression is dying, 
And the monster oppression is dying: 

And if you ask what you there behold 1 

'lis the army of freemen, the true and the bold. 

Too long have slave-holders triumphantly reigned. 
Too long in their chains have they bound us; 

To freedom awaking, no longer enchained, 
The goddess of freedom has saved us, 
The goddess of freedom has saved us : 

And if you ask what has made us free'? 

'Tis the vote that gave us our liberty. 



Holy Freedom* 

«T OLIVER JOHNSON. 

The bondmen are free in the isles of tne main ! 

The chains from their limbs they are flinging ! 
They stand up as men ! — never tyrant again, 

In the pride of his heart, shall God's image profane! 
It is Liberty's song that is ringing ! 
Hark ! loud comes the cry o'er the bounding sea, 

" Freedom ! Freedom ! Freedom, our joy is in thee !" 

Alas! that to-day, on Columbia's shore, 

The groans of her slaves are resounding ! 
On plains of the South their life-blood they pour! 
O, Freemen ! blest Freemen ! your help they implore! 

It is Slavery's wail that is sounding ! 
Hark ! loud comes the cry on the Southern gale, 
" Freedom ! Freedom Freedom or death, must prevail!" 

O ye who are blest with fair Liberty's light, 

With courage and hope all abounding, 
With weapons of love be ye bold for the right ! 
By the preaching of truth put oppression to flight ! 
Then, your altars triumphant surrounding, 
Loud, loud let the anthem of joy ring out ! 
" Freedom ! Freedom I" ist all the world to the shout f 



156 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



ARE YE TRULY FREE! 
Words by J. R. Lowell. 



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"Women ! who~shall one day bear 
Sons to breathe God's bounteous air, 
If ye hear without a blush, 
Deeds to make the roused blood rush 
Like red lava through your veins, 
For your sisters now in chains j 
Answer ! are ye fit to be 
Mothers of the brave and free ? 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 157 



Is true freedom but to break 
Fetters for our own dear sake, 
And, with leathern hearts forget 
That we owe mankind a debt 1 
No ! true freedom is to share 
All the chains our brothers wear, 
And with hand and heart to be 
Earnest to make others free. 

They are slaves who fear to speak 
For the fallen and the weak ; 
They are slaves, who will not choose 
Hatred, scoffing, and abuse, 
Rather than, in silence, shrink 
From the truth they needs must think ; 
They are slaves, who dare not be 
In the right with two or three. 



That's my Country, 

Does the land, in native might, 
Pant for Liberty and Right 1 
Long to cast from human kind 
Chains of body and of mind — 
That's my country, that's the land 
I can love with heart and hand, 
O'er her miseries weep and sigh, 
For her glory live and die. 

Does the land her banner wave, 
Most invitingly, to save ; 
Woing to her arms of love, 
Strangers who would freemen prove 1 
That's the land to which I cling, 
Of her glories I can sing, 
On her altar nobly swear 
Higher still her fame to rear. 

Does the land no conquest make, 
But the war for honor's sake — 
Count the greatest triumph won, 
That which most of good has done— 
That's the land approved of God; 
That's the land whose stainless sod 
O'er my sleeping dust shall bloom, 
Noblest land and noblest tomb ■ 



153 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



YE SONS OF FREEMEN. 

Air, " Marseilles Hymn." 



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162 HASP OF FREEDOM. 



The fearful storm — it threatens lowering, 

Which God in mercy long delays; 
Slaves yet may see their masters cowering, 
While whole plantations smoke and blaze I 
While who>e; plantations smoke and blaze! 
And we may now prevent the ruin, 
Ere lawless force with guilty stride 
Shall scatter vengeance far and wide — 
With untold crimes their hands embruing. 
Have pity on the slave ; 
Take courage from God's word ; 
Pray on, pray on, all hearts resolved — these captives shall be free! 

With luxury and wealth surrounded, 
The southern masters prou-dly dare, 
With thirst of gold and power unbounded, 
To mete and vend God's light and air ! 
To mete and vend God's light and air*, 
Like beasts of burden, slaves are loaded, 
Till life's poor toilsome day is o'er; 
While they in vain for right implore ; 
And shall they longer still be goaded 1 
Have pity on the slave ; 
Take courage from God's word; 
Toil on, toil on, all hearts resolved these captives shall be free. 

O Liberty ! can man e'er bind thee 1 
Can overseers quench thy flame 1 
Can dungeons, bolts, or bars confine thee, 
Or threats thy Heaven born spirit tame % 
Or threats thy Heaven born spirit tame % 
Too long the slave has groaned bewailing 
The power these heartless tyrants wield; 
Yet free them not by sword or shield, 
For with men's heart's they're unavailing. 
Have pity on the slave : 
Take courage from God's word ; 
Vote on ! vote on ! all hearts resolved— these captives shall bo frMfl! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



163 



BE FREE, O MAN, BE FREE. 

Words by Mary II. Maxwell. Music by G. W. C. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Behold the sea-brine leaping 
High in the murky air; 

List to the tempest sweeping 
In ehainless fury there. 

What moves the mighty torrent, 
And bids it flow abroad % 

Or turns the rapid current 1 

What, but the voice of God 1 

Then, answer, is the spirit 

Less noble or less free 1 
From whom does it inherit 

The doom of slavery 1 
When man can bind the waters, 

That they no longer roll, 
Then let him forge the fetters 

To clog the human soul. 

Till then "a voice is stealing 

From earth and sea, and sky, 
And to the soul revealing 

Its immortality. 
The swift wind chants the numbers 

Careering o'er the sea, 
And earth aroused from slumbers, 

Re-echoes, " Man, be free." 

Arouse I Arouse ! 

Arouse, arouse, arouse ! 

Ye bcld New England men ! 
No more with sullen brows, 

Remain as ye have been : 



Your country's freedom calls, 
Once bought by patriots' blood 

Rouse, or that freedom falls 
Beneath :he tyrant's rod I 

Three million men in chains, 

Your friendly aid implore ; 
Slight you the piteous strains 

That from their bosoms pour ? 
Shall it be told in story, 

Or troll'd in burning song, 
New England's boasted glory 

Forgot the bondman's wrong 1 

Shall freeman's sons be taunted, 

That freedom's spirit's fled ; 
That what the fathers vaunted, 

With sordid sons is dead 1 
That they in grovelling gain 

Have lost their ancient fire, 
And 'neath the despot's chain, 

Let liberty expire 1 

Oh no, your father's bones 

Would cry out from the ground ; 
Ay, e'en New England's stones 

Would echo on the sound : 
Rouse, then, New England men ! 

Rally in freedom's name ! 
In your bosoms once again 

Light up the sleeping flame ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



165 



THE LAST NIGHT OF SLAVERY. 



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Let the islands be glad ! 

For their King in his might, 
Who his glory hath clad 
With a garment of light, 
In the waters the beams of his chambers hath laid, 
And in the green waters his pathway hath made. 



No more shall the deep, 

Lend its awe-stricken waves, 
In their caverns to steep 
Its wild burden of slaves ; 
The Lord sitteth King — sitteth King on the flood, 
He heard, and hath answered the voice of their blood, 



Dispel the blue haze, 

Golden fountain of morn ! 
With meridian blaze 
The wide ocean adorn : 
The sunlight has touched the glad waves of the sea^ 
And day now illumines the land of the free. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



167 



THE LITTLE SLAVE GIRL. 

Words by a Lady. Air — Morgiana in Ireland. 



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try it, try it ; Come, come, give me lib - er-ty. 

Ere 1 close my eyes to sleep, 

Thoughts of home keep coming over me ; 
All alone I wake and weep — 

Yet mother hears not — no one pities me — 

Never smiling, sick, forlorn, 
Oh that I had ne'er been born ! 
I should not sorrow to die to-morrow, 
Then mother earth would kindly shelter me; 

Children iry it, could you try it ! 
Give me freedom, yes, from misery ! 

Children try it, try it, try it ! 
Come, come, give me Liberty ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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GET OFF THE TRACK. 

Words by Jesse Hutchinson. Air, " Dan Tucker." 



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Bearing on its train the story, Liberty ! a nation's glory. 



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Frightened, run in all directions ; 
Merchants, editors, physicians, 
Lawyers, priests, and politicians. 

Get out of the way ! every station ! 

Clear the track of 'mancipation I 



170 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Let the ministers and churches 
Leave behind sectarian lurches ; 
Jump on board the Car of Freedom, 
Ere it be too late to need them. 

Sound the alarm ! Pulpits thunder ! 

Ere too late you see your blunder ! 

Politicians gazed, astounded, 
"When, at first, our bell resounded : 
Freight trains are coming, tell these foxes, 
"With our votes and ballot boxes. 

Jump for your lives ! politicians, 
From your dangerous, false positions. 

Railroads to emancipation 

Cannot rest on false foundation. 

And the road of Hunkerdomation 

Leads direct to slave extension. 

Pull up the rails ! Emancipation 
Cannot rest on such foundation. 

All true friends of Emancipation, 

Haste to Freedom's railroad station ; 

Quick into the cars get seated, 

All is ready and completed. — 

Put on the steam ! all are crying, 
And the liberty flags are flying. 

On, triumphant see them bearing, 
Through sectarian rubbish tearing ; 
The bell and whistle and the steaming, 
Startle thousands from their dreaming. 

Look out for the cars while the bell rings' 
Ere the sound your funeral knell rings. 

See the people run to meet us ; 

At the depots thousands greet us ; 

All take seats with exultation, 

In the Car Emancipation. 

Huzza ! Huzza ! ! Emancipation 
Soon will bless our happy nation. 
Huzza! Huzza! Huzza!!! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



171 



FREEDOM'S GLORIOUS DAY 

Words from the " Bangor Gazette." Air, " Crambambule. 






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While every gen - tie tongue re - - joices, And 



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Though many still are writhing under 
The cruel whips of " chevaliers," 

Who mothers from their children sunder, 
And scourge them for their helpless tears— 

Their safe deliv'rance is not far ! 

The day draws nigh ! — hurrah, hurrah ! 

Just ere the dawn the darkness deepest 
Surrounds the earth as with a pall ; 

Dry up thy tears, O thou that weepest, 
That on thy sight the rays may fall ! 

No doubt let now thy bosom mar : 

Send up the shout — hurrah, hurrah ! 

Shall we distrust the God of Heaven %- 
He every doubt and fear will quell ; 

By him the captive's chains are riven- 
So let us loud the chorus swell! 

Man shall be free from cruel law, — 

Man shall be Man ! — hurrah, hurrah ! 

No more again shall it be granted 
To southern overseers to rule — 

No more will pilgrims' sons be taunted 
With cringing low in slavery's school. 

So clear the way for Freedom's car — 

The free shall rule ! — hurrah, hurrah ! 

Send up the shout Emancipation — 
From heaven let the echoes bound — 

Soon will it bless this franchised nation, 
Come raise again the stirring sound 1 

Emancipation near and far — 

Swell up the shout — hurrah ! hurrah ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



173 



HARBINGER OF LIBERTY. 
Words by a Lady. Music by G. W. C. 




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Truth and peace on earth por- tending, Herald 



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174 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Mm at first — but widely spreading, 
Soon 'twill burst supremely bright, 

Life and health and comfort shedding 
O'er the shades of moral night ; 

Hail it, Bondmen ! 
Slavery cannot bear its light. 

Few its rays — 't is but the dawning 
Of the reign of truth and peace; 

Joy to slaves — yet sad forewarning, 
To the tyrants of our race ; 
Tremble, Tyrants ! 
Soon your cruel pow'r will cease. 

Earth is brighten'd by the glory 
Of its mild and peaceful rays ; 

Ransom'd slaves shall tell the story, 
See its light, and sing its praise ; 

Hail it, Christians ! 
Harbinger of better days. 

Light of Truth, 

Hark ! a voice from heaven proclaiming 
Comfort to the mourning slave ; 

God has heard him long complaining, 
And extends his arm to save ; 

Proud Oppression 
Soon shall find a shameful grave. 

See! the light of truth is breaking, 
Full and clear on ev'ry hand ; 

And the voice of mercy, speaking, 
Now is heard through all the land ; 

Firm and fearless, 
See the friends of Freedom stand! 

Lo ! the nation is arousing 

From its slumbers, long and deep; 
And the church of God is waking, 

Never, never more to sleep, 
While a bondman, 

In his chains remains to weep. 

Long, too long, have we been dreaming, 
O'er our country's sin and shame ; 

Let us now, the time redeeming, 
Press the helpless captive's claim, 

Till, exulting, 
He shall cast aside his chain. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



175 



BREAK EVERY YOKE. 

Tune — " O no, we never mention her." 





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him that straight and nar-row way, Which leads to rest a - bove. 



176 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE YANKEE GIRL. 

Words by Whittier. Music by G. W. C. 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 179 



Who comes in his pride to that low cottage-door — 
The haughty and rich to the humble and poor! 
'Tis the great Southern planter — the master who waves 
His whip of dominion o'er hundreds of slaves. 

" Nay, Ellen — for shame ! Let those Yankee fools spin, 
Who would pass for our slaves with a change of their skin ; 
Let them toil as they will at the loom or the wheel, 
Too stupid for shame, and too vulgar to feel ! 

But thou art too lovely and precious a gem 
To be bound to their burdens and sullied by them — 
For shame, Ellen, shame ! — cast thy bondage aside, 
And away to the South, as my blessing and pride. 

Oh, come where no winter thy footsteps can wrong, 
But where flowers are blossoming all the year long, 
Where the shade of the palm tree is over my home, 
And the lemon and orange are white in their bloom ! 

Oh, come to my home, where my servants shall all 
Depart at thy bidding and come at thy call ; 
They shall heed thee as mistress with trembling and awe, 
And each wish of thy heart shall be felt as a law." 

Oh, could ye have seen her — that pride of our girls - 
Arise and cast back the dark wealth of her curls, 
With a scorn in her eye which the gazer could feel. 
And a glance like the sunshine that flashes on steel ' 

" Go back, haughty Southron ! thy treasures of ^oH 
Are dim with the blood of the hearts thou hast sold ! 
Thy home may be lovely, but round it I hear 
The crack of the whip and the footsteps of fear ! 

And the sky of thy South may be brighter than ours, 
And greener thy landscapes, and fairer thy flowers; 
But, dearer the blast round our mountains which raves, 
Than the sweet summer zephyr which breathes over sla ves ! 

Full low at thy bidding thy negroes may kneel, 
With the iron of bondage on spirit and heel ; 
Yet know that the Yankee girl sooner would be 
In fetters with them, than in freedom with thee!" 



180 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



A Parody 



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THE SLAVE'S LAMENTATION. 



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Sadly my wife bowed her beautiful head — 

Long, long ago — long ago ! 
Oh, how I wept when I found she was dead ! 

Long, long ago — long ago ! 
She was my angel, my love and my pride — 
Vainly to save her from torture I tried, 
Poor broken heart ! She rejoiced as she died, 
Long, long ago — long, long ago ! 

Let me look back on the days of my youth- 
Long, long ago — long ago ! 
Master withheld from me knowledge and truth- 
Long, long ago — long ago ! 
Crushed all the hopes of my earliest day, 
Sent me from father and mother away — 
Forbade me to read, nor allowed me to pray- 
Long, long ago — long, long ago ! 



182 



HAUP OF FREEDOM. 



THE STRANGER AND HIS FRIEND. 

Montgomery and Denison. Tune, " Duane Street.' 



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183 



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whence he came ; Yet there was something in his eye. Which 

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Once, when my scanty meal was spread, 

He entered — not a word he spake — 
Just perishing for want of bread, 

I gave him all ; he blessed it, brake, 
And ate, but gave me part again : 
Mine was an angel's portion then, 
For while I fed with eager haste, 
The crust was manna to my taste. 

'Twas night. The floods were out, it blew 

A winter hurricane aloof: 
I heard his voice abroad, and flew 

To bid him welcome to my roof; 
I warmed, I clothed, I cheered my guest, 
I laid him on my couch to rest: 
Then made the ground my bed and seemef 
In Eden's garden while I dreamed. 

I saw him bleeding in his chains, 

And tortured 'neath the driver's lash, 
His sweat fell fast along the plains, 

Deep dyed from many a fearful gash : 
But I in bonds remembered him, 
And strove to free each fettered limb, 
As with my tears I washed his blood, 
Me he baptized with mercy's flood. 



*84 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



I saw him in the negro pew, 

His head hung low upon his breast, 
His locks were wet with drops of dew, 

Gathered while he for entrance pressed 
"Within those aisles, whose courts are given 
That black and white may reach one heaven ; 
And as I meekly sought his feet, 
He smiled, and made a throne my seat. 

In prison I saw him next condemned 
To meet a traitor's doom at morn ; 

The tide of lying tongues I stemmed, 
And honored him midst shame and scorn. 

My friendship's utmost zeal to try, 

He asked if I for him would die ; 

The flesh was weak, my blood ran chill, 

But the free spirit cried, " I will." 

Then in a moment to my view, 

The stranger darted from disguise ; 
The tokens in his hands I knew, 

My Saviour stood before my eyes ! 
He spoke, and my poor name he named— 
" Of me thou hast not been ashamed, 
These deeds shall thy memorial be ; 
Pear not, thou didst them unto me." 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



185 



WE'RE FOR FREEDOM THOUGH THE LAND. 

Words by J. E. Robinson. Music arranged from the " Old Granite State. 




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187 








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vote for freedom Throughout our na - tive land. 



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We have hatred, dark and deep, for the fetter and the thong ; 
We bring light for prisoned spirits, for the captive's wail a song; 
We are coming, we are coming ! and, " No league with tyrant man,' 
Is emblazoned on our banner, while Jehovah leads the van ! 

We will vote for freedom, 

We will vote for freedom. 

We will vote for freedom, 

Throughout our native land. 

We are coming, we are coming ! but we wield no battle brand; 
We are armed with truth and justice, with God's charter in our hand ; 
And our voice which swells for freedom — freedom now and ever more- 
Shall be heard as ocean's thunders, when they burst upon the shore ! 

We will vote for freedom, 

We will vote for freedom, 

We will vote for freedom, 

Throughout our native land. 



188 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Be patient, O, be patient ! ye suffering ones of earth ! 
Denied a glorious heritage — our common right by birth ; 
With fettered limbs and spirits, your battle shall be won! 
O be patient — we are coming ! suffer on, suffer on ! 

We will vote for freedom, 

We will vote for freedom, 

We will vote for freedom, 

Throughout our native land. 

We are coming, we are coming ! not as comes the tempest's wrath, 
When the frown of desolation sits brooding o'er ils path ; 
But with mercy, such as leaves his holy signet-light upon 
The air in lambent beauty, when the darkened storm is gone. 

We will vote for freedom, 

We will vote for freedom, 

We will vote for freedom, 

Throughout our native land. 

O, be patient in your misery ! be mute in your despair ! 

While your chains are grinding deeper, there's a voice upon the air ! 

Ye shall feel its potent echoes, ye shall hear its lovely sound, 

We are coming ! we are coming ! bringing freedom to the bound I 

We will vote for freedom, 

We will vote for freedom, 

We will vote for freedom, 

Throughout our native land. 

Note — Suggested by a song sung by George "W. Clark, at a recent Conrention 
held in Rochester, N. £*. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 189 



Raise a Shout for Liberty. 

Air, " Old Granite State." 
Come, all ye sons and daughters, 
Raise a shout from freedom's quarters, 
Like the voice of many waters, 
Let it echo through the land ; 
And let all the people, 
And let all the people, 
And let all the people, 
Raise a shout for liberty ! 
We have long been benighted, 
And the cause of freedom slighted ; 
Bui we now are all united 

To redeem our native land ; 

And we mean to conquer, (Repeat) 
With a shout for liberty ! 
Let us raise a song of gladness. 
To subdue the tyrant's madness, 
Let us cheer the bondman's sadness, 
With the chorus of the free ; 
And let all the people, &c. 
Raise a shout for liberty ! 
Let Liberty awaken, 
And never be forsaken, 
Till the enemy is taken, 

And the victory is won : — 

Then will all the people, &c. 
Raise a shout for liberty ! 
Come and join our holy mission, 
Whatsoever your condition, 
Let each honest politician, 

Come am! labor for the slave ; 

We will bid you welcome, &c. 

With a shout for liberty ! 

With the flag of freedom o'er us, 

And the light of truth before us, 

Let all freemen raise the chorus, 

And the nation shall be free ; 

Then with all the people, &c. 
Raise a shout for liberty! 

Then spread the proclamation, 
Throughout this guilty nation, 
And let every habitation 

Be a dwelling of the free ! 
And let all the people, &c. 

Raise a shout for libebty ! 



190 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



WE ARE ALL CHILDREN OP ONE PARENT. 

Words from the Youth's Cabinet. 



Music by L. Mason. 




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Sister, thou art worn and weary, Toiling for another's gain 



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Till the darkness of the night Hide thy labors from thy view. 



Oft, alas ! thou hast to bear 

Sufferings more than tongue can tell : 
Thy oppressor will not spare, 

But delights thy griefs to swell ; 
Oft thy back the scourge has felt, 

Then to God thou'st raised the cry 
That the tyrant's heart he'd melt 

Ere thou should'st in tortures die. 

Injured sister, well we know 

That thy lot in life is hard ; 
Sad thy state of toil and wo, 

From all blessedness debarred* 
While each sympathizing heart 

Pities thy forlorn distress ; 
We would sweet relief impart, 

And delight thy soul to bless. 



And what lies within our power 

We most cheerfully will do, 
That will haste the blissful hour 

Fraught with news of joy to you ; 
And when comes the happy day 

That shall free our captive friend, 
When Jehovah's mighty sway 

Shall to slavery put an end : 

Then, dear sister, we with thee 

Will to heaven direct our voice ; 
Joyfully with voices free 

We'll in lofty strains rejoice ; 
Gracious God ! thy name we'll bless, 

Hallelujah evermore, 
Thou hast heard in righteousness, 

And our sister's griefs are o'er. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



191 



FUGITIVE'S TRIUMPH. 



Parody 



Music by Pax. 




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1. Go,go, thou that enslav'st me, Now,now thy power is o'er ; Long.long 

2. Thou, thou, brought'st me ever, Deep,deep sorrow and pain; But I 

3. Tvrant ! thou hast bereft me Hoine,friends, pleasures so sweet,Now, 

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have I obeyed thee, I'm not a slave any more — No, no — oh, no; 
have leftthee forever, Nor will I serve the again — No, no — oh, no! 
forev r er I've left thee, Thou and I never shall meet — No, no — oh, no ! 



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I'm & free man ever - more ! 
No, I'll not serve thee a - gain. 
Thou and I never shall meet. 



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IV. 

Joys, joys, bright as the morning, 
Now, now, on me will pour, 

Hope, hope, on me is dawning. 
I'm not a slave any more ! 

No, no — oh, no, 
I'm a free man evermore I 



19i 



HAEP OF FREEDOM. 



Tenderly. 




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1. Help ! help ! thou God of Christians! Save a mother from des- 

2. From my arms by force they're rended, Sailors drag them to trie 
3 There my son lies pale and bleeding; Fast with cords his hands ar^ 






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4. See his little sister by him, Quaking, trembling, how she 

5. Hear the little daughter begging — Take me, white men, for your 



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ship at an - chor rid - ing, Swift will 

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lies ! Drops of blood her face be - sprinkle — Tears of 
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car - ry them a - way. 
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anguish fill her eyes. 
mother's on - ly son. 



Christians,who's the God you worshfp? 

Is he cruel, fierce, or good ? 
Does he take delight in mercy, 

Or in spilling human blood ? 

VII. 

" Ah ! my poor distracted mother ! 

Hear her scream upon the shore ! :i 
Down the savage captain struck her 

Lifeless on the vessel's floor, 
vnr. 
Up his sails he quickly hoisted, 

To the ocean bent his way : 
Headlong plunged the raving mother 

From a rock into the sea. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



193 



THE TREMBLING FUGITIVE. 



Slow. 



G. W. C. 




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1. To-night the bond-man, Lord, Is bleeding in his chains ; And 

2. To-night is heard the shriek Of pain and anguish wild ; And 
J. To-night, with stealthy tread, "While doors and locks are barr'd, The 



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loud the falling lash is heard, On Car-o - li - na's plains ! 

one by one her heart-strings break, As Rachel mourns her child ! 

slave devours the crumb of bread, The dogs left in the yard ! 

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4. To-night, in swamp or brake, 
The fugitive, Oh God ! 

Hears baying blood-hounds on his track, 
Eager to drink his blood ! 

5. Oh, may no cloud arise 
To hide the pole-star's ray, 

Which smiles and beckons from the skies, 
To cheer him on his way. 

6. Whilst he pursues his flight 
With bleeding heart and limb — 

Shall we petition Thee, to-night, 
And not remember him ? 

1. God ! do thou provide, 
And sure assistance give ; 
And in thy dark pavilion hide 
The trembling fugitive. 



194 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



MY COUNTRY. 

Tune—" God save the King," or " America." 




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1. My country, 'tis for thee, Dark land of slave - ry, 

2. My na -tive coun-try ! thee, Land of the no-ble free — 

3. From ev- ery mountain side, Upon the o-cean's tide, 





For thee I weep ; Land where the slave has sighed, 
Of lib - er - ty — My na - tive coun - try, weep 1 
They call on thee ; A - mid thy rocks and rills, 



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And where he toiled and died, To serve a 
A fast in sor - row keep ; The stain if 
Thy woods and temp -led hills, I hear a 

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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



195 




ty - rant's pride — For 
foul and deep Of 
voice which thrills — Let 



thee 
sla - 
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weep. 

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4. Arise ! break every band, 

And sound throughout this land, 

Sweet freedom's song ; 
No groans their song shall break, 
But all that breathe partake, 
And slaves their silence break — 
The sound prolong. 



5. Our fathers' God ! to thee, 
Author of liberty, 

To thee we pray : 
Soon may our land'be pure, 
Let freedom's light endure, 
And Liberty secure, 
Beneath thy sway. 



THE LIBERTY ARMY. 



Our brother, lo ! we come ! 
But not with sounding drum 

We come to thee. 
No bloody flag we bear ; 
No implements of war, 
Nor carnage red shall mar 

Our victory. 

Our flag is spotless white, 

Our watch-word, " Freedom's Right 

To all be given." 
Our emblem is the dove. 
Our weapons, Truth and Love, 
Our Captain, God above, 

"Who rules in heaven. 



Behold ! Salvation's King 
On the dark tempest's wing 

In haste comes down. 
Oppression's cheek is pale, 
And despots blanch and quail 
The parting clouds reveal 

Jehovah's frown ! 

Exult ye valleys now ! 
Ye melting mountains flow 

To meet your King ! 
Let Slavery's knell be rung ! 
Oppression's dirge be sung ! 
And every bondman's tongue 

Of freedom sing ! 



SPIRIT OF FREEMEN, AWAKE 



Spirit of Freemen, wake ; 
No truce with slavery make, 

Thy deadly foe ; 
In fair disguises dressed, 
Too long hast thou caressed 
The serpent in thy breast ; 

Now lay him low. 



Sons of the Free ! we call 
On you, in field and hall, 

To rise as one ; 
Your heaven-born rights maintain, 
Nor let oppression's chain 
On human limbs remain ; 

Speak, and 'tis done ! 



196 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE SLAVE SINGING AT MIDNIGHT. 

Longfellow. Bavaria— German Air. 



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Songs of triumph and ascriptions, 
Such as reached the swart Egyptians, 
When upon the Red Sea coast 
Perished Pharaoh and his host. 
And the voice of his devotion 
Filled my soul with strange emotion, 
For its tones by turns are glad, 
Sweetly solemn, wildly sad. 



3. 

Paul and Silas, in their prison, 
Sang of Christ the Lord arisen, 
And an earthquake's arm of might 
Broke their dungeon-gates at night. 
But, alas, what holy angel 
Brings the slave this glad evangel ? 
And what earthquake's arm of might 
Breaks his dungeon-gates at night ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



197 



FREEMAN 1 TELL US OF THE NIGHT.* 

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3. Free - man, shall our fet - ter'd race Plead for 






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star ap-proach our land ? Bondman — mark yon dawning 
lib - er - ty in vain ? Bondman — lo ! the God of 



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peace Comes to break your gall- ing chain ! Free-man 1 



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blaze Lights your path to lib - er - ty. 

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free — Spread thy great De - liv - 'rer's name. 

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APPEAL TO WOMAN. 

Aib.- Bavaria, page 196. 
1. 

Sister ! were thy brother bleeding, 

Shedding slavery's scalding tear, 
If for him we now came pleading, 

Should we meet the cruel sneer ? 
Daughter ! were thy parent weeping, 

Clanking now the iron chain, 
Should we come and find thee sleeping, — 

Rouse thee, but to plead in vain ? 

2. 

Mother ! were thy nursling taken 

From thee by a ruffian hand, 
Should we find thee now unshaken, 

Hear thee say, — " Tis God's command !" 
Should thou see thy loved and chosen — 

Thy fond husband sold for gain, 
Thou wouldst deem that bosom frozen, 

That should heedless know thy pain. 



Why then loiter, freedom's daughter 1 

Hear ye not the plaintive tone 
Wafted from the field of slaughter ? 

'Tis a sister's dying moan ! 
Sisters ! Mothers ! lift your voices, 

Join, the cursed chain to break ; 
Onward, till the slave rejoices, 

Freed from bondage : wake — oh ! wake. 



200 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE BRANDED HAND * 
Words by Whittier. Music by G. W. C. 




I. Welcome home a - gain, brave sea -man ! With thy 
2". Why, that brand is bright-est hon - or ! — Than its 
3. As the tern - plar home was welcomed, Back a - 







thoughtful brow and gray, And the old he - ro - ie 
tra - ces nev - er yet Up - on old ar - mo - rial 
gain from Sy - rian wars, The scars of A - rab 



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* Jonathan Walker, a citizen of Massachusetts, returning from Flo- 
rida, on the high seas, took on board his ship, and befriended some poor 
fugitives escaping from the horrors of slavery. For this humane act he was 
imprisoned at Pensacola, Florida, made to pay a fine, put in the stocks,, 
pelted with eggs, and at last the letters " S. S." branded into the living 
flesh of his right hand, with a hot iron. These lines were addressed to hira 
fey Whittier, on his return home* 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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sto - ry Of their fa-theb's branded hand ! 
greet thee, Tru- est friend of God and man 1 



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202 HARP OP FREEDOM. 



He suffered for the ransom 

Of the dear Redeemer's grave, 
Thou for his living presence 

In the bound and bleeding slave ; 
He for a soil no longer 

By the feet of angels trod ; 
Thou for the true Shechina, 

The present home of God ! 



In thy lone and long night •watches, 

Sky above and wave below, 
Thou didst learn a higher wisdom 

Then the babbling school men know ; 
God's stars and silence taught thee, 

As his angels only can, 
That the one sole, sacred thing 

Beneath the cope of heaven is man ! 

6. 
That he, who treads profanely 

On the scrolls of law and creed, 
In the depths of God's great goodness 

May find mercy in his need : 
But woe to him that crushes 

The soul with chain and rod, 
And herds with lower nature, 

The awful form of God 1 

1. 
Then lift thy manly right hand, 

Bold ploughman of the wave 1 
Its branded palm shall prophecy 

" Salvation to the slave !" 
Hold up its fire-wrought language, 

That whoso reads may feel 
His heart swell strong within him, 

His sinews change to steel. 



Hold it up before our sunshine, 

Up against our Northern air — 
Ho ! men of Massachusetts, 

For the love of God look there ! 
Take it henceforth for your standard — 

Like Bruce's heart of yore, 
In the dark strife closing round ye, 

Let that hand be seen before 1 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



203 



" HOLY TIME." 
The Sabbath was made for man." Tune—" Somerville." 

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2. To raise the bond - man from the dust, Where 

3. The light of home a - gain to shed O'er 



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many a drea - ry hearth; To raise once more the 



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joy - ful trust, Take cour - age, and be strong ; To 
tones long fled — The tones of joy and mirth, For 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 




whis - per to the doubt - ing soul ? " The 

pledge to him our heart and hand, That 

this the Sab - bath's hours were given, For 









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tempting draught be-ware ! Touch not, touch not the 
firm - ly by his side, Shoulder to shoul - der 
this was it de - signed, That we there-in might 



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we will stand, As breth - ren true and tried, 
wor- ship Heaven, By toil - ing for man - kind. 






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205 



SLAVEHOLDER'S LAMENT. 
Words by L. P. Judson. Music arranged from " Lucy Neal," by G. W. C. 



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1. What shall we do ? slaveholders cry, O'erwhelmed with dreadful grief, 
[2. We preach and print in every mood, And rob the " negro-pen," 

! 3. These are our fears, and this our dread.They're based on grounds too true, 
J4. We've work'd and toil'd,and rav'd and foam'd,And hop'dto keep them down, 
!5. What shall we do 1 O what, say what ? Our foes increase and rise, 



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Slave - ry, we faer must quickly die, Un-less we find re - lief, 

Railroads and stages throng the wood, Take " things" and make them men ; 

That slavery soon must yield its head, And vanish like the dew ; 

By prayers to Congrpss snugly roomed, Unread, referred or known ; 

Old slavery reels ! the fever's hot, She pants, she gasps, she dies.. 



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Fa - na-tics la-bor night and day, The North is in a blaze, While 
But worst of all, the Free soil crew Seem reckless of our fate, Of 
The old " North Star" we've voted down, and told him not to shine, But 
We've robbed the mail, And taken lives, And then to fright the rest, We've 
What shall we do 1 we'll give it up, And with the North agree, To 



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In the South there's many a man Fears not his voice to raise. 

all the acts we've seen them do, The vote's the thing we hate. 

still he gives Victoria's crown These " things" from Southern clime. 

brandished rifles, bowie-knives, " Cold steel and Dupont's best. 

take the draught from freedom's cup, Let all mankind be free. 




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Morn-ing is break-ing ! Free-dom a - wak-ing ! 
O'er, o'er earthly sadness ! Songs of your gladness ! 



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- way, And give your vote for lib - er - ty. 

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4. Young and old in one com - bin - ing ! 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



209 



I DREAM OF ALL THINGS FREE 1 
Words by Mrs. Hemans. Music by G. W. C. 



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2. I dream of 

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all things free ! 

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heart in chains is bleed - ing, And I 









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THE NEGRO FATHER'S LAMENT * 

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2. My lit - tie ones are mourn-ing, I 

3. But I will cease my mourn -ing, My 



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Hea - ven, To dwell for ev - er more. 

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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



213 



CHORUS. 




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214 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



COMFORT IN AFFLICTION. 

Words by William Leggett. Music by G. W. C. 






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How sweet it were at once to die, 
And leave this blighted orb afar ! 

Mix soul with soul to cleave the sky, 
And soar away from star to star ! 

But oh ! how dark, how drear, how lone, 
Would seem the brightest world of bliss, 

if, wandering through each radiant one, 
We failed to find the loved of this ! 

If there no more the ties should twine, 
Which Death's cold hand alone can sever, 

Ah ! then those stars in mockery sbiae, 
More hateful as they shine forever ! 

It cannot be — each hope and fear, 
That lights the eye or clouds the brow, 

Proclaims there is a happier sphere 
Than this bleak world that holds us now I 

There is a voice which sorrow hears, 
When heaviest weighs life's galling chain, 

'Tis heaven that whispers, " dry thy tears, 
The pure in heart shall meet again." 

The Poor Little Slave. 

FROM "THE CHARTER OAK." 

O pity the poor little slave, 
Who labors hard through all the day — 

And has no one, 

When day is done, 
To teach his youthful heart to pray. 

No words of love— no fond embrace — 
No smiles from parents kind and dear; 

No tears are shed 

Around his bed, 
When fevers rage, and death is near. 

None feel for him when heavy chains 
Are fastened to his tender limb ; 

No pitying eyes, 

No sympathies, 
No prayers are raised to heaven for him. 

Yes I will pity the poor slave, 
And pray that he may soon be free 

That he at last, 

When days are past, 
In heaven may have his liberty. 



216 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE BALLOT-BOX. 



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sold. "What was bought with blood and toil, That you 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



217 




glorious form appeared, 'Midst our own Green Mountain home. 



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bartered right for gold, Here, on Freedom's sacred soil. 

Let your eagle's quenchless eye, 

Fixed, unerring, sleepless, bright, 
Watch, when danger hovers nigh, 

From his lofty mountain height; 
While the stripes and stars shall wave 

O'er this treasure, pure and free — 
The land's Palladium, it shall save 

The home and shrine of liberty. 

Christian Mother* 

BY MISS C. 

Christian mother, when thy prayer, 
Trembles on the twilight air, 
And thou askest God to keep 
In their waking and their sleep, 
Those, whose love is more to thee 
Than the wealth of land or sea — 
Think of those who wildly mourn 
For the loved ones from them torn. 

Christian daughter, sister, wife, 
Ye who wear a guarded life, 
Ye, whose bliss hangs not, thank God, 
On a tyrant's word or nod, 
Will ye hear, with careless eye, 
Of the wild, despairing cry, 
Rising up from human hearts, 
As their latest bliss departs. 

Blest ones, whom no hands on earth, 
Dare to wrench from home and hearth 
Ye, whose hearts are sheltered well 
By affection's holy spell ; 
Oh, forget not those for whom 
Life is nought but changeless gloom ! 
O'er whose days, so woe-begone, 
Hope may paint no brighter dawn. 



218 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



SLAVE'S WRONGS. 

Words by Miss Chandler. Arranged from "Rose of Allandale " 






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The earth was filled with the triumph shout 

Of men who had burst their chains ; 
But his, the heaviest of them all, 

Still lay on his burning veins ; 
In his master's hall there was luxury, 

And wealth, and mental light ; 
But the very book of the Christian law, 

Was hidden from his sight. 

In his master's halls there was wine and mirth, 

And songs for the newly free; 
But his own low cabin was desolate 

Of all but misery. 



220 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



He felt it all — and to bitterness 

His heart wi'thin him turned ; 
While the panting wish for liberty, 

Like a fire in his bosom burned. 

The haunting thought of his wrongs grew changed 

To a darker and fiercer hue, 
Till the horrible shape it sometimes wore 

At last familiar grew ; 
There was darkness all within his heart, 

And madness in his soul ; 
And the demon t^park, in his bosom nursed, 

Blazed up beyond control. 

Then came a scene ! oh ! such a scene ! 

I would I might forget 
The ringing sound of the midnight scream, 

And the hearth-stone redly wet ! 
The mother slain while she shrieked in vain 

For her infant's threatened life ; 
And the flying form of the frighted child, 

Struck down by the bloody knife. 

There's many a heart that yet will start 

From its troubled sleep, at night, 
As the horrid form of the vengeful slave 

Comes in dreams before the sight. 
The slave was crushed, and his fetters' link 

Drawn tighter than before ; 
And the bloody earth again was drenched 

With the streams of his flowing gore. 

Ah ! know they not, that the tightest band 

Must burst with the wildest power 1 — 
That the more the slave is oppressed and wronged, 

Will be fiercer his rising hour % 
They may thrust him back with the arm of might, 

They may drench the earth with his blood — 
But the best and purest of their own, 

Will blend with the sanguine flood. 

I could tell thee more — but my strength is gone, 

And my breath is wasting fast ; 
Long ere the darkness to-night has fled, 

Will my life from the earth have passed: 
But this, the sum of all I have learned, 

Ere I go I will tell to thee ; — 
If tyrants would hope for tranquil hearts, 

They must let the oppressed go free. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



221 



MY CHILD IS GONE. 



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Music by G. W. C. 





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They tore him from my heart away ; 
And now I cry, by night by day— 
My child is gone ! 

How many a free-born babe is press'd 
With fondness to its mother's breast, 
And rocked upon her arms to rest, 

While mine i? ^ono! 

No longer now, at eve I see, 
Beneath the sheltering plantain tree, 
My baby cradled on my knee, 

For he is gone ' 

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And when I seek my cot at night, 
There's not a thing that meets my sight, 
But tells me that my soul's delight, 
My child, is gone ! 

I sink to sleep, and then I seem 
To hear again his parting scream 
I start and wake — 'tis but a dream — 
My child ia gone ! 

Gone — till my toils and griefs are o'er, 
And I shall reach that happy shore, 
Where negro mothers cry no more— 
My child is gone ! 



222 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE BLIND SLAVE-BOY. 



Words by Mrs. Dr. Bailey 

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My mother, come back to me ! close to thy breast 

Once more let thy poor little blind one be pressed ; 

Once more let me feel thy warm breath on my cheek, 

And hear thee in accents of tenderness speak ! 

O mother ! I've no one to love me — no heart 

Can bear like thine own in my sorrows a part, 

No hand is so gentle, no voice is so kind, 

Oh ! none like a mother can cherish the blind ! . 

Poor blind one ! No mother thy wailing can hear, 
No mother can hasten to banish thy fear ; 
For the slave-owner drives her, o'er mountain and wild, 
And for one paltry dollar hath sold thee, poor child ! 
Ah ! who can in language of mortals reveal 
The anguish that none but a mother can feel, 
When man in his vile lust of mammon hath trod 
On her child, who is stricken and smitten of God ! 



Blind, helpless, forsaken, with strangers alone, 

She hears in her anguish his piteous moan ; 

As he eagerly listens — but listens in vain, 

To catch the loved tones of his mother again ! 

The curse of the broken in spirit shall fall 

On the wretch who hath mingled this wormwood and gall, 

And his gain like a mildew shall blight and destroy, 

Who hath torn from his mother the little blind boy ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



225 



THE FUGITIVE SLAVE TO THE CHRISTIAN. 



Words by Elizur Wright, jr. 



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I felt the stripes, the lash I saw, 
Red, dripping with a father's gore ; 
And, worst of all their lawless law, 
The insults that my mother bore ! 

The hounds are baying on my track, 
O Christian ! will you send me back 1 

Where human law o'errules Divine, 
Beneath the sheriff's hammer fell 
My wife and babes, — I call them mine,- 
And where they suffer, who can tell % 
The hounds are baying on my track, 
O Christian ! will you send me back? 



I seek a home where man is man, 
If such there be upon this earth. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 227 



To draw my kindred, if I can, 
Around its free, though humble hearth. 
The hounds are baying on my track, 
O Christian ! will you send me back ! 



The Strength of Tyranny. 

The tyrant's chains are only strong 

While slaves submit to wear them ; 
Vnd, who could bind them on the strong, 

Determined not to wear them % 

hen clank your chains, e'en though the links 

Were light as fashion's feather : 
"be heart which rightly feels and thinks 

Would cast them altogether. 

The lords of earth are only great 

While others clothe and feed them ! 
But what were all their pride and state 

Should labor cease to heed them 1 
The swain is higher than a king : 

Before the laws of nature, 
The monarch were a useless thing, 

The swain a useless creature. 

We toil, we spin, we delve the mine, 

Sustaining each his neighbor; 
And who can hold a right divine 

To rob us of our labor 1 
We rush to battle— bear our lot 

In every ill and danger— 
And who shall make the peaceful cot 

To homely joy a stranger 1 

Perish all tyrants far and near, 

Beneath the chains that bind us; 
And perish too hat servile fear 

Which mak' s the slaves they find us : 
One grand, or e universal claim — 

One peal cf moral thunder — 
One glorious burst in Freedom's name, 

And rend our bonds asunder I 



228 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



O PITY THE SLAVE MOTHER. 



Words from the Liberator. 

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HARP OF FREEDOM. 229 



The mildew of slavery has blighted each blossom, 

That ever has bloomed in her path-way below ; 
It has froze every fountain that gushed in her bosom, 

And chilled her heart's verdure with pitiless woe : 
Her parents, her kindred, all crushed by oppression ; 

Her husband still doomed in its desert to stay ; 
No arm to protect from the tyrant's aggression — 

She must weep as she treads on her desolate way. 

O, slave-mother, hope ! see — the nation is shaking ! 

The arm of the Lord is awake to thy wrong ! 
The slave-holder's heart now with terror is quaking 

Salvation and Mercy to Heaven belong ! 
Rejoice, O rejoice ! for the child thou art rearing, 

May one day lift up its un manacled form, 
While hope, to thy heart, like the rain-bow so cheering, 

Is born, like the rain-bow, 'mid tempest and storm. 



How long- ! O ! how long- ! 

Bow long will the friend of the slave plead in vain 1 

How long e'er the Christian will loosen the chain'? 

If he, by our efforts, more hardened should be, 

O Father, forgive him ! we trust but in thee. 

That 'we're all free and equal,' how senseless the cry, 

While millions in bondage are groaning so nigh ! 

O where is our freedom 1 equality where 1 

To this none can answer, but echo cries, where? 

O'er this stain on our country we'd fain draw a veil, 

But history's page will proclaim the sad tale, 

That Christians, unblushing, could shout ' we are free/ 

Whilst they the oppressors of millions could be. 

They can feel for themselves, for the Pole they can feel, 

Towards Afric's children their hearts are like steel; 

They are deaf to their call, to their wrongs they are blind j 

In error they slumber nor seek truth to find. 

Though scorn and oppression on our pathway attend, 
Despised and reviled, we the slave will befriend ; 
Our Father, thy blessing ! we look but to thee, 
Nor cease from our labors till all shall be free. 
Should mobs in their fury with missiles assail. 
The cause it is righteous, the truth will prevail ; 
Then heed not their clamors, though loud they proclaim 
That freedom shall slumber, and slavery reign. 



230 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE aUADROON MAIDEN. 

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231 




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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



He said, " My ship at anchor rides 
In yonder broad lagoon ; 

I only wait the evening tides, 
And the rising of the moon. 

Before them, with her face up- 
raised, 

In timid attitude, 
Like one half curious, half amazed, 

A Quadroon maiden stood. 

And on her lips there played a 
smile 

As holy, meek, and faint, 
As lights, in some cathedral aisle, 

The features of a saint. 

" The soil is barren, the farm is 
old," 
The thoughtful Planter said, 
Then looked upon the Slaver's 
gold, 
And then upon the maid. 

His heart within him was at strife, 
With such accursed gains ; 

For he knew whose passions gave 
her life, 
Whose blood ran in her veins. 

But the voice of nature was too 
weak: 
He took the glittering gold ! 
Then pale as death grew the maid- 
en's cheek, 
Her hands as icy cold. 

The Slaver led her from the door, 
He led her by the hand, 

To be his slave and paramour 
In a far and distant land. 



Domestic Bliss. 

BY REV. JAMES GREGG. 

Domestic bliss; thou fairest flower 
That erst in Eden grew, 

Dear relic of the happy bower, 
Our first grand parents knew ! 



We hail thee in the rugged soil 
Of this waste wilderness, 

To cheer our way and cheat our 
toil, 
With gleams of happiness. 

In thy mild light we travel on, 
And smile at toil and pain ; 

And think no more of Eden gone, 
For Eden won again. 

Such. Emily, the bliss, the joy 
By Heaven bestowed on you ; 

A husband kind, a lovely boy, 
A father fond and true. 

Religion adds her cheering beams, 
And sanctifies these ties; 

And sheds o'er all the brighter 
gleams, 
She borrows from the skies. 

But ah ! reflect ; are all thus blest 1 
Hath home such charms fov all? 

Can such delights as these invest 
Foul slavery's wretched thrall. 

Can those be happy in these ties 
Who wear her galling chain 1 

Or taste the blessed charities 
That in the household reign 1 

Can those be blest, whose hope, 

whose life, 
Hang on a tyrant's nod ; 
To whom nor husband, child; nor 

wife 
Are known— yea, scarcely Godl 

Whose ties may all be rudely riven, 

At avarice' fell behest j 
Whose only hope of home is 

heaven, 

The grave their only rest. 

Oh ! think of those, the poor, th' op- 
pressed, 
In your full hour of bliss ; 
Nor e'er from prayer and effbrl 
rest, 
While ear.h bears woe like this. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



233 



BROTHERS BE BRAVE FOR THE PINING SLAVE. 

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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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Brothers be brave for the pining slave, 

From his wife and children riven ; 
From every vale their bitter wail 
Goes sounding up to Heaven. 

Then for the life of that poor wife, 

And for those children pining; 
O ne'er give o'er till the chains no more 
Around their limbs are twining. 

Gloomy and damp is the low rice swamp, 
Where their meagre bands are wasting ; 
All worn and weak, in vain they seek 
For rest, to the cool shade hasting ; 
For drivers fell, like fiends from hell, 

Cease not their savage shouting; 
And the scourge's crack, from quivering back, 
Sends up the red blood spouting. 

Into the grave looks only the slave, 

For rest to his limbs aweary; 
His spirit's light comes from that night, 
To us so dark and dreary. 
That soul shall nurse its heavy curse 

Against a day of terror, 
When the lightning gleam of his wrath shall strea> 
Like fire, on the hosts of error. 

Heavy and stern are the bolts which burn 

In the right hand of Jehovah ; 
Te smite the strong red arm of wrong, 
And dash his temples over; 

Then on amain to rend the chain, 
Ere bursts the vallied thunder ; 
Right onward speed till the slave is freed— 
His manacles to. n asunder. 

E. D. 



236 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



HARK ! I HEAR A SOUND OF ANGUISH. 



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Let us raise our supplication 
For the wretched suffering slave, 

All whose life is desolation, 
All whose hope is in the grave ; 

God of mercy ! 
From thy throne, O hear and save. 

Those in bonds we would remember 
As if we with them were bound ; 

For each crushed, each suffering member 
Let our sympathies abound. 
Till our labors 
Spread the smiles of freedom round. 

Even now the word is spoken ; 

,: Slavery's cruel power must cease, 
From the bound the chain be broken, 
Captives hail the kind release," 
While in splendor 
Comes to reign the Prince of Peace. 
3* 



238 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE AFRIC'S DREAM. 

Words by Miss Chandler. " Emigrant's Lament," arranged by G. W. C 






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HARP OF FREEDOM. 239 



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My chains, these hateful chains, were gone— oh, would that I might 

die, 
So from my swelling pulse I could forever cast them by ! 
And on, away, o'er land and sea, my joyful spirit passed, 
Till, 'neathmy own banana tree, I lighted down at last. 

My cabin door, with all its flowers, was still profusely gay, 

As when I lightly sported there, in childhood's careless day ! 

But trees that were as sapling twigs, with broad and shadowing 

bough, 
Around the well-known threshhold spread a freshening coolness now. 

The birds whose notes I used to hear, were shouting on the earth, 
Qls if to greet me back again with their wild strains of mirth ; 
My own bright stream was at my feet, and how I laughed to lave 
My burning lip, and cheek, and brow, in that delicious wave ! 

My boy, my first-born babe, had died amid his early hours, 
A.nd there we laid him to his sleep among the clustering flowers; 
Yet lo ! without my cottage-door he sported in his glee, 
With her whose grave is far from his, beneath yon linden tree. 

i sprang to snatch them to my soul; when breathing out my name, 
To grasp my hand, and press my lip, a crowd of loved ones came ! 
Wife, parents, children, kinsmen, friends ! the dear and lost ones all, 
With blessed words of welcome came, to greet me from my thrall. 

Forms long unseen were by my side ; and thrilling on my ear, 
Came cadences from gentle tones, unheard for many a year ; 
And on my cheeks fond lips were pressed, with true affection's kiss— 
And so ye waked me from my sleep — but 'twas a dream of bliss I 



240 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



I AM MONARCH OF NOUGHT I SURVEY. 
A Parody. Air " Old De-Fleury.' 




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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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I am out of humanity's reach, 

And must finish my life with a groan ; 
Never hear the sweet music of speech 

That tells me my body's my own. 
Society, friendship, and love, 

Divinely bestowed upon some, 
Are blessings I never can prove, 

If slavery's my portion to come. 

Religion ! what treasures untold, 

Reside in that heavenly word ! 
More precious than silver or gold, 

Or all that this earth can afford. 
But I am excluded the light 

That leads to this heavenly grace ; 
The Bible is clos'd to my sight, 

Its beauties I never can trace. 

Ye winds, that have made me your sport, 
Convey to this sorrowful land, 

Some cordial endearing report, 
Of freedom from tyrany's hand. 



My friends, do they not often send, 
A wish or a thought after me 1 

O, tell me I yet have a friend, 
A friend I am anxious to see. 

How fleet is a glance of the mind ! 

Compared with the speed of its flight ; 
The tempest itself lags behind, 

And the swift-winged arrows of light. 
When I think of Victoria's domain, 

In a moment I seem to be there, 
But the fear of being taken again, 

Soon hurries me back to despair. 

The wood-fowl has gone to her nest, 

The beast has lain down in his lair ; 
To me, there's no season of rest, 

Though I to my quarter repair. 
If mercy, O Lord, is in store, 

For those who in slavery pine ; 
Grant me when life's troubles are o'er, 

A place in thy kingdom divine. 



242 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



NEGRO BOY SOLD FOR A WATCH.* 

Words by Cowper. Arranged by G. W. C. from an old theme. 






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* An African prince having arrived in England, and having been 
asked what he had given for his watch, answered, " What I will 
never give again — I gave a fine boy for it." 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 2^3 



His father's hope, his mother's pride, 
Though black, yet comely to the view 

I tore him helpless from their side, 
And gave hirn to a ruffian crew — 

To fiends that Afric's coast annoy, 
I sold the hapless Negro Boy. 

From country, friends, and parents torn, 
His tender limbs in chains confined, 

I saw him o'er the billows borne, 
And marked his agony of mind ; 

But still to gain this simple toy, 

I gave the weeping Negro Boy. 

In isles that deck the western wave 

1 doomed the hapless youth to dwell, 
A poor, forlorn, insulted slave ! 

A BEAST THAT CHRISTIANS BUY AND SELL ! 

And in their cruel tasks employ 
The much-enduring Negro Boy. 

His wretched parents long shall mourn, 
Shall long explore the distant main 

In hope to see the youth return ; 
But all their hopes and sighs are vain : 

They never shall the sight enjoy, 

Of their lamented Negro Boy. 

Beneath a tyrant's harsh command, 
He wears away his youthful prime ; 

Far distant from his native land, 
A stranger in a foreign clime. 

No pleasing thoughts his mind employ, 

A poor, dejected Negro Boy. 

But He who walks upon the wind, 
Whose voice in thunder's heard on highi 

Who doth the raging tempest bind, 
And hurl the lightning through the sky, 

In his own time will sure destroy 
The oppressor of the Negro Boy. 



244 



HARP OP FREEDOM. 



OUR COUNTRYMEN 

Words by C. W. Dennison. Tune — " From Greenland's Icy Mountains." 






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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



245 




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on them in their sad - ness, To wipe those tears a- way. 



Where proud Potomac dashes 

Along its northern strand, 
Where Rappahannock lashes 

"Virginia's sparkling sand ; 
Where Eutaw, famed in story, 

Flows swift to Santee's stream, 
There, there in grief and gory 

The pining slave is seen ! 

And shall New England's daugh- 
ters, 

Descendants of the free, 
Beside whose far-famed waters 

Is heard sweet minstrelsy — 
Shall they, when hearts are break- 
ing, 

And woman weeps in woe, 
Shall they, all listless waiting, 

No hearts of pity show 1 

No ! let the shout for freedom 

Ring out a certain peal ; 
Let sire and youthful maiden, 

All who have hearts to feel, 
Awake ! and with the blessing 

Of Him who came to save, 
A holy, peaceful triumph, 

Shall greet the kneeling slave I 



The Free Soller's Song. 

We hoist fair Freedom's standard, 

On hill and dale it stands ; 
From broad Atlantic's borders, 

To Oregon's far lands. 
Where'er the winds may wander, 

Where'er the waters roll, 
Its wide-spread folds extending, 

Shall spread from pole to pole. 

Tho' slavery's frightened forces 

May sound their loud alarms, 
And call their flying squadrons 

To muster up their arms. 
Tho' Slavery's minions falter, 

And knees of Doughface shake, 
No freeman's soul shall tremble 

Nor for slave thunder quake. 

Tho' Fillmoreites and Buckites 

May jibe, and jeer, and flout, 
With " freedom" on our banner, 

We'll whip the cravens out. 
" Free soil, free speech" for ever, 

Shall on our " free flag" fly, 
Till mountain and till valley 

Shall echo back the cry 



246 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE NEGRO'S APPEAL. 
Words by Cowper. Tune—" Isle of Beauty.' 



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Is there, as ye sometimes tell me, 
Is there one who reigns on high 1 

Has he bid you buy and sell me, 
Speaking from his throne — the sky 1 

Ask him, if your knotted scourges, 
Matches, blood-extorting screws, 

Are the means that duty urges 



Hark ! he answers — wild tornadoes, 

Strewing yonder sea with wrecks, 
Wasting towns, plantations, meadows, 

Are the voice with which he speaks. 
He. foreseeing what vexations 

Afric's sons should undergo, 
Fixed their tyrant's habitations, 

Where his whirlwinds answer — No ! 

By our blood in Afric' wasted, 

Ere our necks received the chain ; 
By the miseries that we tasted, 

Crossing in your barks the main : 
By our sufferings, since ye brought us 

To the man-degrading mart, 
All sustained by patience, taught us 

Only by a broken heart — 

Deem our nation brutes no longer, 

Till some reason ye shall find, 
Worthier of regard and stronger 

Than the color of our kind. 
Slaves of gold! whose sordid dealings 

Tarnish all your boasted powers ; 
Prove that you have human feelings, 

Ere you proudly question ours. 



248 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



SLAVE GIRL MOURNING HER FATHER. 

Parodied from Mrs. Sigourney by G. W. C. 



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249 



I begged him, " father, do not go ! 

For, since my mother died, 
I love no one so well as you ;" 

And, clinging to his side, 
The tears came gushing down my cheeks 

Until my eyes were dim ; 
Some were in sorrow for the dead, 

And some in love for him. 

He knelt and prayed of God above, 

" My little daughter spare, 
And let us both here meet again, 

O keep her in thy care." 
He does not come !— I watch for him 

At evening twilight grey, 
Till every shadow wears his shape, 

Along the grassy way. 

I muse and listen all alone, 

When stormy winds are high, 
And think I hear his tender tone, 

And call, but no reply ; 
And so I've done these four long years, 

Without a friend or home, 
Yet every dream of hope is vain, — 

Why don't my father come 1 

Father — dear father, are you sick, 

Upon a stranger shore 1 — 
The people say it must be so — 

O send to me once more, 
And let your little daughter come, 

To soothe your restless bed, 
And hold the cordial to your lips, 

And press your aching head. 

Alas ! — I fear me he is dead ! — 

Who will my trouble share 1 
Or tell me where his form is laid, 

And let me travel there 1 
By mother's tomb I love to sit, 

Where the green branches wave ; 
Good people ! help a friendless child 

To find her father's grave. 



The Slave and lier Bab?. 

WORDS BY CHARLOTTE ELIZABETH. 
"Can a woman forget her sucking child?' 
Air — "Slave Girl mourning her Father." 
O, massa, lei me stay, to catch 



My baby's sobbing breath ; 



His little glassy eye to watch, 
And smooth his limbs in death, 

And cover him with grass and leaf, 
Beneath the plantain tree ! 

It is not sullenness, but grief— 
O, massa, pity me \ 

God gave me babe — a precious boon, 

To cheer my lonely heart, 
But massa called to work too soon, 

And I must needs depart. 
The morn was chill — I spoke no word, 

But feared my babe might die, 
And heard all day, or thought I heard, 

My little baby cry. 

At noon — O, how I ran ! and took 

My baby to my breast ! 
I lingered— and the long lash broke 

My sleeping infant's rest. 
I worked till night — till darkest night, 

In torture and disgrace ; 
Went home, and watched till morniLg 
light, 

To see my baby's face. 

The fulness from its cheek was gone, 

The sparkle from its eye ; 
Now hot, like fire, now cold, like stone, 

I knew my babe must die. 
I worked upon plantation ground, 

Though faint with woe and dread, 
Then ran, or flew, and here I found — 

See massa, almost dead. 

Then give me but one little hour — 

! do not lash me so ! 

One little hour — one little hour — 

And gratefully I'll go. 
Ah me ! the whip has cut my boy, 

1 heard his feeble scream ; 
No more — farewell my only joy, 

My life's first gladsome dream \ 

I lay thee on the lonely sod, 

The heaven is bright above : 
These Christians boast they heve a God, 

And say his name is Love : 
O gentle, loving God, look down ! 

My dying baby see ; 
The mercy that from earth is flown, 

Perhaps may dwell with Thee ! 



250 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE BEREAVED FATHER. 

Words by Miss Chandler. Music by G. 




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251 



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Woe to the hearts that heard, unmoved, 
The mother's anguish'd shriek ! 

And mock'd, with taunting scorn, the tears 
That bathed a father's cheek. 

Woe to the hands that tore you hence, 

My innocent and good ! 
Not e'en the tigress of the wild, 

Thus tears her fellow's brood. 

I list to hear your soft sweet tones, 

Upon the morning air ; 
I gaze amidst the twilight's gloom, 

As if to find you there. 

But you no more come bounding fori 

To meet me in your glee ; 
And when the evening shadows fall, 

Ye are not at my knee. 

Your forms are aye before my eyes, 

Your voices on my ear, 
And all things wear a thought of you, 

But you no more are here. 

You were the glory of my life, 

My blessing and my pride ! 
I half forgot the name of slave, 

When you were by my side ! 

Woe for your lot, ye doom'd ones ! woe 

A seal is on your fate ! 
And shame, and toil, and wretchedness, 

On all your steps await I 



25: 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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WHAT MEANS THAT SAD AND DISMAL LOOK? 

Words by Geo. Russell. Arranged from "Near the Lake," by G. W. C. 

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253 



Ah ! Mother, hast thou ever known 
The pain of parting ties 1 

Wa^ ev r er infant from thee torn 
And sold before thine eyes 1 

Say, would not grief thy bosom 
swell 1 
Thy tears like rivers flow 1 
Should some rude ruffian seize and 
sell 
The child thou lovest sol 

There's feeling in a Mother's 
breast, 
Though colored be her skin ! 
And though at Slavery's foul be- 
hest, 
She must not weep for kin. 

I had a lovely, smiling child, 

It sat upon my knee ; 
And oft a tedious hour beguiled, 

With merry heart of glee. 

That child was from my bosom 
torn, 
And sold before my eyes ; 
With outstretched arms, and looks 
forlorn , 
It uttered piteous cries. 

Mother! dear Mother !— take, O 
take 
Thy helpless little one ! 
Ah! then I thought my heart 
would break ; 
My child — my child was gone. 

Long, long ago, my child they 
stole, 
But yet my grief remains ; 
These tears flow freely— and my 
soul 
In bitterness complains. 

Then ask not why "my dismal 
look," 
Nor why my " falling tears," 
Such wrongs, what human heart 
can brook % 
No hope for me appears. 



Tlie Slave Boy's Wish. 

EY ELIZA LEE FOLLEN. 

I wish I was that little bird, 
Up in the bright blue sky ; 

That sings and flies just where he 
will, 
And no one asks him why. 

I wi- h I was that little brook, 
T lat runs so swift along; 

Through pretty flowers and shin- 
ing stones, 
Singing a merry song. 

I wish I was that butterfly, 
Without a thought or care ; 

Sporting my pretty, brilliant wings, 
Like a flower in the air. 

I wish I was that wild, wild deer, 

I saw the other day ; 
Who swifter than an arrow flew, 

Through the forest far away. 

I wish I was that little cloud, 
By the gentle south wind driven ; 

Floating along, so free and bright 
Far, far up into heaven. 

I'd rather be a cunning fox, 
And hide me in a cave ; 

I'd rather be a savage wolf, 
Than what I am — a slave. 

My mother calls me her good boy, 
My father calls me brave ; 

What wicked action have I done, 
That I should be a slave. 

I saw my little sister sold, 

So will they do to me ; 
My Heavenly Father, let me die, 

For then I shall be free. 



25A 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Words by Whittier. 
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HAEP OF FREEDOM. 



255 



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256 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 




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Woe is me 

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my sto - len daughters ! 



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wa-ters, — Woe is me my sto - len daughters! 

Gone, gone — sold and gone, 
To the rice-swamp dank and lone, 
Oh, when weary, sad, and slow, 
From the fields at night they go, 
Faint with toil, and rack'd with pain, 
To their cheerless homes again — 
There no brother's voice shall greet them — 
There no father's welcome meet them. — Gone, rf*c. 

Gone, gone— sold and gone, 
To the rice-swamp dank and lone, 
From the tree whose shadow lay 
On their childhood's place of play — 
From the cool spring where they drank — 
Rock, and hill, and rivulet bank— 
From the solemn house of prayer, 
And the holy counsels there. — Gone, <frc. 

Gone, gone — sold and gone, 

To the rice-swamp dank and lone, 

Toiling through the weary day. 

And at night the Spoiler's prey ; 

Oh, that they had earlier died, 
Sleeping calmly, side by side, 

Where the tyrant's power is o'er, 

And the fetter galls no more ! — Gone, fyc. 

Gone, gone — sold and gone, 

To the rice-swamp dank and lone, 

By the holy love He beareth— 

By the bruised reed He spareth — 

Oh, may He, to whom alone 

All their cruel wrongs are known, 

Still their hope and refuge prove, 

With a more than mother's love.— Gone, fyc. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 257 

JOHNNY BULL TO BROTHER JONATHAN, ON THE SPLIT. 

United States, if our good will 

Could but command its way. 
You would remain united still. 

For ever and a day. 
Does England want to see you split, 
United States ? — the deuce a bit. 

Why, who are we 1 Almost alone, 

With you, upon this earth, 
We bow before no tyrant's throne. 

Believe us, aught but mirth 
Your noble commonwealth, if cleft, 
Would cause us Britons, weaker left. 

What head we might, against the wrong, 

Together make, friends ! 
We wish you to continue strong, 

On union strength depends-. 
So that your State may keep compact 
Is our desire — now that's a fact. 

By priest and soldier's twofold ways, 

The old world groans, opprest. 
We, and you only, far away, 

With liberty are blest. 
. And may we still example give, 
And "teach the nations how to live." 

How all the despots would rejoice, 

Should you break up and fail ; 
How would the flunkey's echoing voice 

Take up their master's tale. 
" Free institutions will not do," 
Would be the cry of all the crew. 

The press is gagged — the mouth is shut — 

None dare their thoughts to name, 
In Europe round ; and lackeys strut, 

Arrayed in splendid shame ; 
And creeds are at the bayonet's point, 
Enforced in this time out of joint. 

Still be it yours and ours to bear 

Our witness 'gainst these days. 
The world at least will not despair, 

Whilst we our free flags raise. 
Then may you still your stripes possess, 
And may your stars be never less. 

Strange it may seem, and yet is not ; 

The peril of the free, 
All springs from one unhappy blot, 

The taint of slavery. 
That, that is all you have to dread : 
Get rid of that, and go ahead. — Punch, 



HAUP OF FREEDOM. 



FREEDOM'S GATHERING. 



Words by Whittier. 



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259 




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260 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 









Let them blacken our names and pursue us with ill, 
Our hearts shall be faithful to /liberty still; 
Then rally ! then rally ! come one and come all, 
"With harness well girded, and echo the call. 

Thy hill-tops, New England, shall leap at the cry, 
And the prairie and far distant south shall reply; 
It shall roll o'er the land till the farthermost glen 
Gives back the glad summons again and again. 

Oppression shall hear in its temple of blood, 
And read on its wall the handwriting of God ; 
Niagara's torrent shall thunder it forth, 
It shall burn in the sentinel star of the North. 

It shall blaze in the lightning, and speak in the thunder, 

Till Slavery's fetters are riven asunder, 

And freedom her rights has triumphantly won, 

And our country her garments of beauty put on. 

Then huzza, then huzza, 
Truth's glittering falchion for freedom we draw. 

Let them blacken our names, and pursue us with ill, 
We bow at thy altar, sweet liberty, still ! 
As the breeze fm the mountain sweeps over the river, 
So, chainless and free, shall our thoughts be^ for ever. 

Then on to the conflict for Freedom and truth ; 
Come Matron, come Maiden, come Manhood and youth, 
Come gather ! come gather ! come one and come all, 
And soon shall the altars of Slavery fall. 

The forests shall know it, and lift up their voice, 
To bid the green prairies and valleys rejoice ; 
And the " Father of Waters^" join Mexico's sea, 
In the anthem of Nature for millions set free. 

Then huzza ! then huzza ! 
Truth's glittering falchion for freedom we draw. 



Be kind to each other. 

BY CHARLES SWAIN. 

Be kind to each other ! 

The night's coming on, 
When friend and when brother 

Perchance may be gone ! 
Then 'midst our dejection, 

How sweet to have earned 
The blest recollection, 

Of kindness — returned ! 

When day hath departed, 
And memory keeps 



Her watch, broken-hearted, 
Where all she loved sleeps 

Let falsehood assail not, 
Nor envy disprove — 

Let trifles prevail not 
Against those ye love ! 

Nor change with to-morrow, 

Should fortune take wing, 
But the deeper the sorrow, 

The closer still cling ! 
Oh ! be kind to each other ! 

Tbe night's coming on, 
When friend and when brother 

Perchance may be gone. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



261 



G. W. C. 



THE LIBERTY BALL. 

Air, " Rosin the Bow.' 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 








ball — And roll on the liberty ball, Come aid 

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The Liberty hosts are advancing— 
For freedom to all they declare ; 

The down-trodden millions are sighing — 
Come, break up our gloom of despair. 
Come break up our gloom of despair, &c. 

Ye Democrats, come to the rescue, 

And aid on the liberty cause, 
And millions will rise up and bless you 

With heart-cheering songs of applause, 
With heart-cheering songs, &c. 

Ye Fogies quit Slavery's minions, 

And boldly renounce your old pranks ; 

We care not for party opinions, 
But invite you all into our ranks— 
And invite you all into our ranks. 

A nd when we have formed the blest union 
We'll firmly march on, one and all— 

We'll sine when we meet in communion, 
And roll on the liberty ball, 

A nd roll on the liberty ball, &.c. 



How can you stand halting while virtue 

Is sweetly appealing to all ; 
Then haste to the standard of duty, 

And roll on the liberty ball ; 

And roll on the liberty ball, &c. 

The question of test is now turning, 
And freedom or slavery must fall, 

While hope in the bosom is burning, 
We'll roll on the liberty ball ; 

We'll roll on the liberty ball, &c. 

Ye freemen attend to your voting. 

Your ballots will answer the call ; 
And while others attend to log-rolling, 

We'll roll on the liberty ball— 

We'll roll on the liberty ball, &c. 

Tiie Home of the Free. 

Hark ! hark ! to the Trumpet of Free- 
dom ! 
Her nllying signal she blows : 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



263 



Come, gather around her broad banner, 
And battle 'gainst Liberty's foes. 

Our forefathers plighted their honor, 
Their lives and their property, too, 

To maintain in defiance of Britain, 
Their principles, righteous and true. 

We'll show to the world we are worthy 
The blessings our ancestors won, 

And finish the temple of Freedom, 
That Hancock and Franklin begun. 

Hurra, for the old-fashioned doctrine, 
That men are created all free ! 

We ever will boldly maintain it, 
Nor care who the tyrant may be. 

When Poland was fighting for freedom, 
Our voices went over the sea, 

To bid her God-speed in the contest — 
That Poland, like us, might be free. 

When down-trodden Greece had up-risen 
And baffled the Mahomet crew ; 

We rejoiced in the glorious issue, 
That Greece had her liberty, too. 

Repeal, do we also delight in — 
Three cheers for the " gem of the sea !" 

And soon may the bright day be dawning. 
When Ireland, like us, shall be free. 

Like us, who are foes to oppression ; 
But not like America now. 



With shame do we blush to confess it» 
Too many to slavery bow. 

We're foes unto wrong and oppression. 
No matter which side of the sea ; 

And ever intend to oppose them, 
Till all of God's image are free. 

Some tell us because men are colored, 
They should not our sympathy share ; 

We ask not the form or complexion — 
The seal of our Maker is there ! 

Success to the old-fashioned doctrine, 
That men are created all free ! 

And down with the power of the despot 
Wherever his strongholds may be be 

We're proud of the name of a freeman 
And proud of the character, too ; 

And never will do any action, 
Save such as a freeman may do. 

We'll finish the Temple of Freedom, 
And make it capacious within, 

That all who seek shelter may find it, 
Whatever the hue of their skin. 

For thus the Almighty designed it, 
And gave to our fathers the plan ; 

Intending that liberty's blessings, 
Should rest upon every man. 

Then up with the cap-stone and cornice, 

With columns encircle its wall, 
Throw open its gateway, and make it 

A HOME AND A HEKUGB FOX ALL ! 



264 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



WE'RE COMING ! WE'RE COMING ! 
Parody by G. W. C Air « K inloch of Kinloch." 




We're coming, we're coming, the fearless and free, Like the 
True sons of brave fathers who battled of yore, When 






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England's proud li - on ran wild on our shore 



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265 




slave power is trem-bling as trem 



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"We're coming, we're coming, with banners unfurled, 
Our motto is freedom, our country the world ; 
Our watchword is liberty — tyrants beware ! 
For the Liberty army will bring you despair ! 
We're coming, we're coming, we'll come irom afar, 
Our standard we'll nail to humanity's car ; 
With shoutings we'll raise it, in triumph to wave, 
A trophy of conquest, or shroud for the brave. 

Then arouse ye, brave hearts, to the rescue come on ! 
The man-stealing army we'll surely put down ; 
They are crushing their millions, but soon they must yield, 
For freemen have risen and taken the field. 
Then arouse ye ! arouse ye ! the fearless and free, 
Like the winds of the desert, the waves of the sea ; 
Let the north, west, and east, to the sea-beaten shore. 
Resound with a liberty triumph or.ce more. 



266 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE CLARION OF FREEDOM. 

Words from the Emancipator. Music " The Chariot.'* 



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shout in - de - pen - dence from Slave-ry 



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The army — the army have taken the field, 

And the hosts of Freemen never, never will yield ; 

By free principles strengthened, each bosom now glows 

And with ardor immortal the struggle they close 

The armor, the armor that girds every breast, 
Is the hope of deliverance for millions oppressed; 
O'er the tears, and the sighs, and the wrongs of the slave, 
See the white flag of freedom triumphantly wave. 

The conflict— the conflict will shortly be o'er, 
And the demon of slavery shall rule us no more ; 
And the laurels of victory shall surely reward 
The heroes immortal who've conquered for God. 



268 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



WAKE, WAKE, YE FREEMEN ALL ! 

Air, " Lucy Long." 

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209 




mountain, vale, and plain, From lake, and stream, and sea ! 



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Redeem, redeem the land, 

Accurs'd with slavery's chain ; 
Be strong in his right hand, 

Whose strength is never vain. 
Grasp, grasp with all your might, 

The freeman's holy sword, 
And let its blade of light, 

Leap forth at freedom's word. 

Down, down, that banner black, 

Polluting freedom's air, 
And drive the minions back, 

Who come to plant it here ! 
Lift, lift the ensign white, 

In heaven's broad canopy, 
And spread its folds of light, 

To flash from sea to sea ! 



Strike, strike your manhood blow ; 

Strike sure, and strike it home ! 
Nor let earth's darkest foe, 

Up from the grave-dust come. 
Shout, shout the victory ! 

Earth's joyous realms around ; 
Till the loud pealing cry, 

Back from the skies resound ! 



270 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



THE VOTER'S SONG. 
Words by E. Wright, jr. Air, from "Niel Gow's Farewel'." 







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We'll scatter not the precious power 
On parties that to slavery cower ; 
But make it one against the wrong, 
Till down it comes, a million strong. 
The tyrant's grapple, &c. 

We'll bake the dough-face with our vote, 
Who stood the scorching when we wrote; 
An though they spurned our earnest prayers, 
The ballot bids them now, beware. 
The tyrant's grapple, &c. 

Our vote shall teach all statesmen law, 
Who in the Southern harness draw ; 
So well contented to be slaves, 
They fain would prove their fathers knaves ! 
The tyrant's grapple, &c. 

We'll not provoke our wives to use 

A power that we through fear abuse ; 

His mother shall not blush to own 

One voter of us for a son. 

The tyrant's grapple, by our vote, 
We'll loosen from our brother's throat ; 
With Washington we here agree, 
Whose mother taught him to be free! 



272 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



LIBERTY BATTLE-SONG. 

Air — " Our Warrior's Heart." 

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friends of law and right, 
Free- dom's cause de - light, 







rouse, a - rouse, a - rouse ! 
rouse, a - rouse, a - rouse ! 



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Awake, and couch Truth's fatal 
dart, 

Awake ! awake ! awake ! 
Bid error to the shades depart, 

Awake ! awake ! awake ! 
Prepare to deal the deadly blow, 
To lay the power of Slavery low, 
A ballot, lads, is our veto ; 

Awake! awake! awake! 



Arise ! ye sons of honest toil, 

Arise ! arise ! arise I 
Ye freeborn tillers of the soil, 

Arise ! arise ! arise ! 
Come from your workshops and 

the field, 
We've sworn to conquer ere we'll 

yield ; 
The ballot-box is Freedom's shield 

Arise ! arise ! arise I 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



273 



Unite and strike for equal laws, 

Unite ! unite ! unite ! 
For equal justice ! that's our cause 

Unite ! unite ! unite ! 
Shall the vile slavites win the day \ 
Shall men of whips and blood bear 

sway 1 
Unite, and dash their chains away 

Unite ! unite ! unite ! 

March on ! and vote the hirelings 

down, 

March on ! march on ! march on ! 

Our blighted land with blessings 

crown, 

March on ! march on ! march on ! 

Shall Manhood ever wear the 

chain 1 
Shall Freedom look to us in vain ? 
Up to the struggle ! Strike again ! 
March on ! march on ! march on ! 



And echoes bound from pole to pole, 

Hurrah, &c. 
All parties are rallying to the test, 
From the north and east and glo- 
rious west, 

Hurrah, &c. 



>Tls a glorious Year. 

"Words by Jesse Hutchinson, jr. 
'Tis a glorious year in which we 
live, 
Hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah ! 
And now three hearty cheers we'll 
give, 
Hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah ! 
From all the honest sons of toil, 
The cry is heard — " free soil ! free 

soil !" 
Hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah ! 
Hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah ! 

On every breeze glad tidings roll, 
Hurrah, &c. 



We pledge to freedom the eastern 
States, 

Hurrah, &c. 
And the west will go for our can- 
didates, 

Hurrah, &c. 
Whigs, democrats, and nativites, 
Will yet unite — for our cause is 
right, 

Hurrah, &c. . 

The good time, boys, is coming near, 

Hurrah, &c. 
And myriad hearts shall bless this 
year, 

Hurrah, &c. 
The orator's tongue and poet's pen 
All tell us where, and how, and 
when, 

Hurrah, &c. 

Then let us give three cheers once 
more, 

Hurrah, &c. 
With a voice as loud as " Niagara's 
roar," 

Hurrah, &c. 
This shall inspire us as we toil ; 
Free men, free speech, and God's free 

soil, 
Hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah I 
Hurrah, &c. 



274 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



PARTY OF THE WHOLE. 

Words by E. Wright, jr. Tune—" 'Tis Dawn, the Lark is Singing.' 






1. Will ye de-spise the a - corn, Just thrusting out its 
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HARP OP FREEDOM. 275 



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broad and mighty riv - ers, On sweeping to the tide % 



floods, the sea is thirst - ing, To drink you like the dew. 

That crescent, faint and trembling, 

Her lamp shall nightly trim, 
Till thou, imperious planet, 

Shall in her light grow dim r 
And so shall wax the Party, 

Now feeble at its birth, 
Till Liberty shall cover 

This tyrant trodden earth. 

That party, as we term it, 

The Party of the Whole- 
Has for its firm foundation, 

The substance of the soul ; 
It groweth out of Reason, 

The strongest soil below ; 
The smaller is its budding, 

The more its room to grow ! 

Then rally to its banners, 

Supported by the true — 
The weakest are the waning, 

The many are the few : 
Of what is small, but living, 

God makes himself the nurse; 
While " Onward" cry the voices 

Of all his universe. 

Our plant is of the cedar, 

That knoweth not decay : 
Its growth shall bless the mountains, 

Till mountains pass away. 
God speed the infant party, 

The party of the whole — 
And surely he will do it, 

While reason is its soul. 



276 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



SONG FOR THE ELECTION. 

Air, " Scots wha hae." 

«te— 4- — — -J— h — -K- - = I-.- « — ^~tsl--al— si- — H 



Ye who know and do the right, Ye who che-rish 
Boasts your vote no high - er aim, Than between two 







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hon - or bright, Ye who wor - ship love and light, 
blots of shame That would stain our coun - try's fame. 



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Choose your side to - day. Sue - cor free - dom 
Just to choose the least 1 Let it stern - ly 





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now you can, Vot - ing for an hon - est man ; 

an - swer no ! Let it straight for Free - dom go ; 






HARP OF FREEDOM. 



277 



(§) — >— V-h — k— l P I — +*-*-§— S-t-«-+« — -P 



Let not slavery's blight and ban, On your bal - lot lay. 
Let it swell the winds that blow From the north and east. 




Blot !— the smaller — is a curse, 
Blighting conscience, honor, purse ; 
Give us any, give the worse, 

'Twill be less endured. 
Freemen, is it God who wills 
You to choose, of foulest ills, 
That which only latest kills 7 

No ; he wills it cured. 

Do your duty, He will aid ; 
Dare to vote as you have prayed ; 
Who e'er conquered, while his 
blade 

Served his open foes 1 
Right established would you see 1 
Feel that you yourselves are free ; 
Strike for that which ought to be- 

God will bless the blows 



Children of the Glorious Dead. 

MRS. S. T. MARTYN. 

Children of the glorious dead, 
"Who for freedom fought and bled, 
With her banner o'er you spread, 

On to victory ! 
Not for stern ambition's prize, 
Do our hopes and wishes rise ; 
Lo, our leader from the skies, 

Bids us do or die. 



Ours is not the tented field — 
We no earthly weapons wield ; 
Light and love, our sword and 

shield, 

Truth our panoply. 
This is proud oppression's hour ; 
Storms are round us ; shall we 

cower, 
While beneath a despot's power 

Groans the suffering slave 1 

While on every southern gale, 
Comes the helpless captive's tale, 
And the voice of woman's wail, 
And of man's despair ? 
While our homes and rights are 

dear, 
Guarded still with watchful fear, 
Shall we coldly turn our ear 

From the suppliant's prayer? 

Never ! by our Country's shame — 
Never ! by a Saviour's claim, 
To the men of every name, 

Whom he died to save. 
Onward, then, ye fearless band — 
Heart to heart, and hand to hand ; 
Yours shall be the patriot's stand— 

Or the martyr's grave. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



SALT RIVER CHORUS. 

Air, " Cheer up. my lively Lads." Arranged by G. W. C 
Con Spirito. 

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Cheer up, we'll stop their craft, and up Salt river sail her. 



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Our Southern friends are coming on — 

Fraternity 's our motto ; 
We welcome them with all our heart, 
As every freeman ought to. 
Then cheer up my lively lads, 
In spite of Slavery's power ; 
Cheer up, we'll stop their craft, 
And up Salt River sail her. 

We'll sing " free speech," " free men," my boys, 

Nor sing for Buck and Fillmore ; 
For Hunker rhymes are growing stale, 

And Hindoo songs grow staler. 
Then, cheer up, &c. 

Now Slavery's craft is floating by, 

Containing Buck and Fillmore — 
Aboard, my boys, and seize the helm, 

And up Salt River sail her. 
Then, cheer up, &c. 

For conscience and your Country's sake, 

Come every true reformer — 
Here join to stay proud Slavery's curse, 

And from free soil to spurn her. 
Then, cheer up, &c. 

Our flag is floating on the breeze, 
Though not for the Pirate Slaver — 

'Tis for Free Speech, Free Soil, Free Men, 
And to the mast we'll nail her. 
Then, cheer up, &c. 



280 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



RIGHT ONWARD WE GO! 

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Far above the dark storm-cloud the clear sunbeams rest, 
And the bright bow of promise gleams forth or. its breast ; 
Before us a future of labor and love — 
Free brethren around us — a just God above. 

A future of labor, brave, honest and free — 
No monarch, no slaves, but a brotherhood we; 
A future of love, when the just and the true 
Shall rule in the place of the strong and the few. 

Throw out the broad canvass to catch the free wind — 
Leave old party issues, like rubbish, behind ; 
With Justice aud Love to lead on our van, 
Live and die we, for Freedom, for Truth, and for Man. 



FREE STATE SONGS. 



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Free States we will have — work without melancholy, 
For Toil to the Freeman is pleasant and holy ; 
We'll bow to no power but the Spirit who gave us 
Such hearts — that Tyrants shall never enslave us. 

Chorus. Free Statesmen are coming, <fec. 

One effort, my brother — one pull all together, 
And the balance of party is light as a feather ; 
One party is trembling — hurrah ! for our thunder, 
And the other — believe me — goes tumbling under. 

Chorus. Free Statesmen are coming, &c. 

Then Freedom and Labor shall hold sweet communion ; 
The Rich and the Poor find a brotherly union ; 
The record of Time tell of Liberty's story, 
And " Our Country" again be the watchword of glory. 
Chorus. Free Statesmen are coming, &c, 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



285 



THE FREE STATE DEBATE. 

Air, " Old Granite State.' 



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HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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0, the Slavocrats are quaking, at the move we are making, 
They make a dreadful shaking, at the free State debate ; 
By the men whom they have cheated, they are sure to be defeated, 
Measure for measure meted, in the free State debate : 
Chorus — Then hurrah for Freedom, Then hurrah for Freedom, 
Then hurrah for freedom, Throughout our native land. 

We'll have in our delegation honest men of every station, 
Who're resolved to save the nation, in the Congress at hand ; 
For our faith we have plighted, that Dough faces shall be righted, 
And we'll all be united as a true brother band. 
Chorus — Then hurrah for freedom, Then hurrah for freedom, 

Then hurrah for freedom, Throughout our native land. 



288 HARP OF FREEDOM. 

The Free Soil Voter's Song. 

BY A. WARREN STEARNS. 

Air, " Old Granite State." 
Hark ! the sound is swelling louder, 

Hear it booming o'er the plain, 
Like the rush of mighty waters — 

Hark ! the echo rings again ! 
Through the valley, o'er the mountain, 

By the river-side and sea, 
From Penobscot's farthest fountain, 

And from every northern lea. 
Chorus — We are all for freedom, We are all for freedom, 

We are all for freedom, And. we'll sound it thro' the land. 
List, again ! the sound approaches, 

Nearer yet, and nearer still — 
Lo, they come ! the marshalled forces, 

Streaming over yonder hill ! 
'Tis the mighty hosts of freemen, 

And the hardy sons of toil, 
They are girding on their armor, 

And their cry is heard — " Free Soil!" 
Chorus — We are all 
Freemen, up! let's join the chorus, 

Let us swell the increasing throng; 
All around us, and before us, 

See the tide that rolls along ; 
They rally from the northern lake, 

And from the eastern hill, 
While from their western prairie homes, 

Behold them, coming still! 
Chorus — We are all 
Who would tarry now, or linger 1 

Coward ! let him stay behind ! 
Freedom's cause must not be periled, 

We a better man can find ! 
Od, with speed ! our eagle soaring, 

Waves his pinions once again, 
Slavery's chains shall break asunder, 

Ere it reach the western main. 
Chorus — We are all 
Sing aloud the songs that gladden 

Every freeman's swelling heart ; 
Foes are spreading, hopes may wither, 

One more cheer and then we part. 
Huzza! huzza! for freedom's cause, 

Nor yield it but with life — 
We 've enlisted for the battle, 

We are ready for the strife. 
Chorus — We are all 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



BRIGHT IS THE DAYBREAK. 

Air, " Rory O'More," Arranged by G. W. C. 



Moderato. 



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290 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



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292 'HARP OF FREEDOM. 



CHARLES SUMNER. 

Sumner ! thy name shall long recorded be 
Among the champions of Liberty ! 
And hoary sires, their grandsons on their knee, 
Shall teach the debt of love they owe to thee. 
God shield thy consecrated head from harm, 
Restore thy health, invigorate thine arm, 
Raise up his servant, Freedom's cause to plead, 
And her triumphant hosts to victory lead ! 
Yes, Liberty shall triumph, God hath said 
The proud oppressor captive shall be led, 
The slave shall yet exult that he is free, 
And, Sumner, then he'll cherish thoughts of thee 



DO YOUR BEST. 

The times are hard, an' fortune shy, 

Has lang been ilka grummler story, 
But work aye on, an' aim aye high, 

The harder work — the greater glory. 
The honest mind, the sterling man, 

The chains o' poortith canna fetter ; 
So strive, an' do the best ye can, 

An' tak my word, ye'll sune be better. 

Although ye toil for little gear — 

Tho' wiles you labor may be slichted, 
The darkest sky is sure to clear, 

An 5 virtue's wrangs wi' aye be richted. 
Ne'er deem yoursel' an ill-used man, 

Nor ca' the world a heartless debtor, 
But strive, and do the best ye can, 

An' tak my word, ye'll sune be better. 

Oh, sweet is freedom's caller air, 

An' sweet is bread o' aine's ain winning ! 
To work, and win, be aye your care, 

Great things hae aft a sma' beginning. 
Let naught e'er ding ye frae your plan ; 

Stick to your creed in ilka letter ; 
But strive to do the best ye can, 

An' tak my word, ye'll sune be better. 

[James BaUantync. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



293 



FREE SOIL CHORUS. 

Air, " Auld Lang Syne 

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Too long we've dwelt in party strife, 

'Tis time to pour in oil ; 
So here's a dose for Uncle Sam, 

Of freedom and free soil. 
For freedom, &c. 

Our southern neighbors feel our power, 

And gladly would recoil ; 
But 'tis " too late," the cry's gone forth, 

For freemen and free soil. 
For freemen, &c. 

Then let opponents do their best 

Our spirits to embroil ; 
No feuds shall e'er divide our ranks 

Till victory crowns free soil. 
For freemen, &c. 

They've called us Sisslers long enough, 

We now begin to boil, 
And ere November shall come round, 

We'll cook them up free soil. 
For freedom, &c. 

Then let us sing God bless the free, 

The noble sons of toil ; 
And let the shout ring all about, 

Of freedom and free soil. 
For freedom, &c. 






HARP OF FREEDOM. 295 



SWANEE RIVER. 

Time—" Old Folks at Home,: 1 

Way down upon de Swanee River, far, far away, 

Thar's whar my heart is turning ever, 

Thar's whar de loved ones stay ; — 

All up and down de whole creation, sadly I roam, 

Still longing for de old plantation, 

And for de loved ones at home. 

All de world am sad and dreary 
Every where I roam, 

When will de day of Mancipation 
Bring all de darkies home ) 

All round de little farm I wandered when I was young, 

Den many happy days I squandered, 

Many de songs I sung. 

When I was playing wid my brother, happy was I, 

But when dey sold me down de River, 

Den seemed my heart would die. 

Chorus — All de world, &c. 

One little hut among de bushes, one dat I love, 

Still sadly to my memory rushes, 

No matter where I rove ; — 

When shall I hear de bees a humming all round de comb 1 

When shall I hear de sound of Freedom 

Down in my dear old home ? 

All de world am sad and dreary 

Every where I roam, 
When will de day of Mancipation 

Bring all de darkies home 7 



OH, CARRY ME BACK ! 

Tune — " Carry me back to Old Virginny.'" 

The burning sun from day to day, 

Looks down on toil and pain, 
Where drivers hold their heartless sway 

With whip and clanking chain ; 
With cracking whip and clanking chain, 

Our woes will soon be o'er — 
Oh. carry me back to old Virginia, 

To old Virginia's shore ! 



296 HARP OF FREEDOM, 



Where broad Potomac rolls away, 

A snow-white cabin gleams, 
A mother with her child at play — 

Oh, God. they mock my dreams. 
The cracking whip and clanking chain. 

In dreams are heard no more. 
Oh, carry me back to old Virginia, 

To old Virginia 'a shore. 

They coin onr very heart for gold. 

Our sweat makes rich their soil, 
Where cotton fields are wide unrolled 

We Irop and die in toil : 
The cracking whip and clanking chain 

In death are heard no more. 
0h s carry me back to old Virginia. 

To old Virginia's shore. 



THEY WORKED ME ALL THE DAT WITHOUT A BIT OF PAY. 
Tune— •■ D. \ -est M 

Come, freemen, listen to my song, a story I'll relate. 
It happened in the valley of the >ld Carlina State 
They marched me to the cotton field at early dawn of day, 
And worked me there from morn till night without a bit of pay. 
Chorus — They worked me all the day without a bit of pay, 
So I took my flight in the middle of the night 
When the moon am gone away. 

Old massa sire me a holler day and say he'd give me more, 
I thank VI him very kindly, and shoved my boat from shore : 
I drifted down the river, my heart was light and free, 
I had my eye on the bright North star, and thought of liberty. 
Chorus — They worked me all the flay, &c, 

I jumped out of my good old boat, and pushed it from the shore 
And travelled faster on that night than ever I*d done be: ; i e 
I came up to a farmer's house just at the break of day. 
And saw a white man standing there — says he. You're a runaway 
Yes, but they worked me all the day. dec. 

I told him I had left the whips, and the baying of the hound, 
To find a place where man is man, if such there could be found 
That I had heard in Canada that all mankind were free, 
That I was going northward now in search of liberty ; — 

For thev worked me all the dav. ice. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 297 

SLAVE'S ADDRESS TO THE EAGLE. 

Tune — " Carrier Dove" 

Fly away from thy native hills, proud bird, 

Thou emblem of the free ; 
For a deep-drawn sigh in the land is heard, 

It crosses the waves of the sea ; 
'Tis the sigh of the slave who pines in his chain, 

As he bends 'neath the despot's yoke, 
Where the scorn, and the lash, and the tyrant's rein, 

Have his spirit subdued and broke. 

As he goes to his toil at early morn, 

The bloodhounds are watching his track 
And the pay for his work when his labor is done, 

Can be known by the scars on his back ! 
His wife, she is torn from his bosom away, 

No more shall her form greet his sight, 
And, helpless, he no word can say 

'Gainst this power that tramples on right. 

The children that played round his cabin door, 

To gladden his heart by their glee, 
Are torn from his arms, and he no more 

Their cherished forms shall see ; 
He himself hath no home or abiding place, 

Like a beast he is forced by the rod 
To the auction-block, oh ! deep disgrace, 

To be endured by the image of God ! 

Oh, fly from this land, from scenes like these, 

As dark and as drear as the grave ! 
Where the songs of the free, as they float on the breeze, 

Are drowned by the cry of the slave ! 
Go to the haughty tyrant's throne ; 

Leave this, thy native land, 
Where the rulers may buy, or sell, or own, 

The life of a brother man. 



THE POOR VOTER'S SONG. 
Air — " Lucy Long." 

They knew that I was poor, 

And they thought I was base ; 

They thought that I'd endure 
To be covered with disgrace ; 



298 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



They thought me of their tribe, 

Who on filthy lucre doat, 
So they offered me a bribe 

For my vote, boys ! my vote ! 
shame upon my betters, 

Who would my conscience buy 1 
But I'll not wear their fetters, 
Not I, indeed, not I ! 

My vote 1 It is not mine 

To do with as I will ; 
To cast, like pearls, to swine, 

To these wallowers in ill. 
It is my country's due, 

And I'll give it, while I can, 
To the honest and the true, 
Like a man, like a man ! 
shame, tec- 
No no, I'll hold my vote, 

As a treasure and a trust, 
My dishonor none shall quote, 

When I'm mingled with the dust; 
And my children, when I'm gone, 

Shall be strengthened by the thought, 
That their father was not one 

To be bought, to be bought ! 
shame, &c. 



MANHOOD. 

BY ROBERT BURNS. 

Tune — " Our Warriors' Hearts." 

Is there for honest poverty, 

That hangs his head, and a' that ; 
The coward slave, we pass him by, 

We dare be poor, for a' that ; 
For a' that and a' that ; 

Our toils obscure, and a' that, 
The rank is but the guinea's stamp, 

The man's the gowd for a' that. 

What though on homely fare we dine, 
Wear hodden gray and a' that ; 

Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine, 
A man's a man for a' that ; 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 299 



The honest man tho' e'er so poor, 

Is king o' men for a' that ; 
The rank is but the guinea's stamp, 

The man's the gowd for a' that. 

Then let us pray that C3me it may, 

As come it will for a' that, 
That sense and worth o'er a' the earth, 

May bear the gree and a' that ; 
For a' that and a' that, 

It's coming yet, for a' that, 
That man to man, the world all o'er, 

Shall brother's be, for a' that. 

Terms explained : — Gowd — gold. Hodden — homespun, or mean. 
Gree — honor, or victory. 



THE BALLOT. 

BY J. E. DOW. 

Air — " Bonnie Doon." 

And shall the safeguard of the free, 

By valor won on gory plains, 
Become a solemn mockery 

While freemen breathe and virtue reigns 1 
Shall liberty be bought and sold 

By guilty creatures clothed with power 1 
[s honor but a name for gold, 

And PRINCIPLE a WITHERED FLOWER 1 

The parricide's accursed steel 

Has pierced thy sacred sovereignty ; 
And all who think and all who feel, 

Must act or never more be free. 
No party chains shall bind us here; 

No mighty name shall turn the blow ; 
Then, wounded sovereignty, appear, 

And lay the base apostates low. 

The wretch, with hands by murder red, 

May hope for mercy at the last ; 
And he who steals a nation's bread, 

May have oblivion's statute passed. 
But he who steals a sacred right, 

And brings his native land to scorn, 
Shall die a traitor in her sight, 

With none to pity or to mourn. 



SCO HARP OF FREEDOM. 

HAIL THE PAY ! 
Tune-' Wreaths the Bowl" or " Yankee Doodle. 

Hail the day 

Whose joyful ray 
Speak? of emancipation ! 

The clay that broke 

Oppression's yoke — 
The birth-day of a nation! 

When England's might 

Put forth for right,. 
Achieved a fame more glorious 

Than armies tried. 

Or navies' pride. 
O'er land and sea victorious ! 

Soon may we gain 

An equal name 
In honor's estimation I 

And righteousness 

Exalt and bless 
Our glorious happy nation ! 

Brave hearts shall lend 

Strong hands to rend 
F nil slavery's bonds asunder. 

And liberty 

Her jubilee 
Proclaim] in tones of thunder. 

We hail afar 

Fair freedom's star. 

Her day-star brightly glancing ; 
We hear the tramp 
From Freedom's camp, 

Assembling and advancing ! 

Come join your hands 
With freedom's bands. 

New England's sons and daughters ! 
Speak your decree — 
Man shall be free — 

As mountains, winds, and waters ! 

And haste the day 

Whose coming ray 
Speaks our emancipation ! 

Whose glorious light, 

Enthroning right. 
Shall bless and save the nation ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 801 



FOR THE ELECTION. 

Tune — " Scots wha hae with Wallace bled. 

Ye who know and do the right, 
Ye who cherish honor bright. 
Ye who worship love and light, 

Choose your side to-day, 
Succor Freedom, now you can, 
Voting for an honest man ; 
Let not slavery's blight and ban, 

On your ballot lay. 

« 
Boasts your vote no higher aim, 
Than between two blots of shame 
That would stain our country's fame, 

Just to choose the least % 
Let it sternly answer no ! 
Let it straight for Freedom go ; 
Let it swell the winds that blow 

From the north and east. 

Blot ! — the smaller — is a curse, 
Blighting conscience, honor, purse ; 
Give us any, give the worse, 

'Twill be less endured. 
Freemen, is it God who wills 
You to choose, of foulest ills, 
That which only latest kills 1 

No ; he wills it cured. 

Do your duty, He will aid ; 
Dare to vote as you have prayed ; 
Who e'er conquered while his blade 

Served his open foes 1 
Right established would you see 1 
Feel that you yourselves are free 1 
Strike for that which ought to be — 

God will bless the blows. 



THE SPIRIT OF THE PILGRIMS. 
Tune — " Be free, Oh, man, be free." 

The spirit of the Pilgrims 
Is spreading o'er the earth, 

And millions now point to the land 
Where freedom had her birth : 



302 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Hark ! Hear ye not the earnest cry- 
That peals o'er every wave - ? 
' God above, 
In thy love, 
liberate the slave ! " 

Ye heard of trampled Poland, 

And of her sons in chains, 
And noble thoughts flashed through your minds, 

And fire flowed through your veins. 
Then wherefore hear ye not the cry 
That breaks o'er land and sea 1 — 
'• On each plain, 
Rend the chain, 
And set the captive free !" 

Oh, think ye that our fathers, 

(That noble patriot band,) 
Could now look down with kindling joy, 

And smile upon the land ? 
Or would a trumpet-tone go forth, 
And ring from shore to shore ; — 
" All who stand, 
In this land, 
Shall be free for evermore !" 

Great God, inspire thy children, 
And make thy creatures just, 

That every galling chain may fall, 

And crumble into dust : 

That not one soul throughout the land 

Our fathers died to save, 

May again, 

By fellow-men, 

Be branded as a Slave ! 



THE MINSTREL BOY. 

(Air on page 101.) 

The Minstrel Boy to the war has gone, 
In the ranks of death you'll find' him j 

His Father's sword he has girded on, 
And his wild harp hung behind him :- 

,( Land of song," said the warrior bard — 
" Tho' all the world betrays thee ; 

One sword at least thy right shall guard- 
One faithful harp shall praise thee." 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 



The Minstrel fell, but the foeman's chain 

Could not bring his proud soul under: 
The harp he loved ne'er spoke again, 

For he tore its cords asunder, 
And said, " No chains shall sully thee, 

Thou son of love and bravery, 
Thy songs were made for the pure and free, 

They shall never sound in Slavery !" 



THE SLAVEHOLDER'S PRAYER. 

BY B. C. WITH CHORUS BY G. W. C. 

Tune — " Dandy Jim" with variation. (See page 33.) 

These slaves I now possess are mine, 

Sanction'd by laws of earth and heaven ; 
I thank thee, oh ! thou Great Divine, 
That unto me this boon is given ! 
Chorus — My old master tells me so ! 
'Tis a blessed system 0, 
It came from heaven, this I know, 
For my old master tells me so. 

In Scripture thou hast bade us make 

Slaves of the heathen and the stranger ; 
And if we heathen " niggers" take, 
There is no harm nor any danger. 
Chorus — My old master, &c. 

Sure in thy wisdom thou made us 

The instruments to show thy power ; 
And thus fulfil on them the curse 

Of" Cain," — nay, " Ham," until this hour. 
Chorus — My old master, &c. 

What care we for the Northern fools, 
Who talk about the rights of" niggers 1" 

We know that we were made to rule, 
And they ordained to be the diggers. 
Chorus — My old master, &c. 

Besides, it can be seen at sight, 

Our slaves, if freed, would turn out lazy ; 

And if the fanatics are right, 

The Bible's wrong and we are crazy. 
Chorus — My old master, &c. 

Then hold on, brethren of the South — ■ 

They tell me agitation's dying ; 
This cry's in almost every mouth, 

Unless you think the rascal's lying. 
Chorus — My old master, &c. 



304 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Whether or not this " corner-stone" 
Of our republic shall e'er crumble, 

Our laws and niggers are our own, 
So let the poor fanatics grumble. 
Chorus — My old master, &c. 



RAISE A SHOUT FOR LIBERTY. 

Air—" Old Granite State." 

Come all ye sons and daughters, 
Raise a shout for freedom's quarters, 
Like the voice of many waters, 
Let it echo through the land : 
And let all the people, 
And let all the people, 
And let all the people, 
Raise a shout for liberty. 

We have long been benighted, 
And the cause of freedom slighted, 
But we now are all united 

To reform our native land : 

And we mean to conquer, {Repeat) 

With a shout for liberty ! 

Let us raise a song of gladness, 
To subdue the tyrant's madness, 
Let us cheer the bondman's sadness, 

With the chorus of the free ; 
And let all the people, &c. 

Raise a shout for liberty ! 

Let Liberty awaken, 
And never be forsaken, 
Till the enemy is taken, 

And the victory is won : — 
Then will all the people, &c. 

Raise a shout for liberty ! 

Come and join our holy mission, 
Whatsoever your condition, 
Let each honest politician 

Come and labor for the slave 
We will bid you welcome, &c. 

With a shout for liberty ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 805 



With the flag of freedom o'er us, 
And the light of truth before us, 
Let all freemen raise the chorus, 

And the nation shall he free, 
Then will all the people, &c. 

Raise a shout for liberty ! 

Then spread the proclamation, 
Throughout this guilty nation, 
And let every habitation 

Be a dwelling of the free ! 
And let all the people, &c. 

Raise a shout for liberty. 



WE'VE HAD A CORDIAL GREETING* 

Air — " Old Granite State" 

Here we've had a cordial greeting, 
And we've had a thrilling meeting, 
And our labor here completing 

We'll seek the next town, 
From town to town we'll battle, 
From town to town we'll battle, 
From town to town we'll battle, 

Until slavery's beat down. 

But we leave here faithful legions, 
To defend these conquer 'd regions, 
And to keep the battle raging, 

In all the towns about, 
Here you'll guard the fortress, &c. 

And put the foe to rout. 

Now the churches must awaken, 
The State must now be shaken, 
And a mighty stride be taken, 

Towards the truth and the light ; 
And all must fear and tremble, &c. 

Who refuse to do the right. 

Now we'll give the foe no quarter, 
At the ballot-box or altar, — 
She is Babylon's foul daughter, 

And our work, it must not pause, 
And we'll fight for freedom, &c. 

True religion and just laws. 
? To be sung at the close of anti-slavery meetings and conventions. 



306 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



MARCH ON! MARCH ON! 
Tune— " The Pirate's Glee.' 1 ' 

March on ! march on, ye friends of freedom for all 

For truth and right contend ; 
Be ever ready at humanity's call, 

Till tyrants' power shall end. 
The proud slaveholders rule the nation, 

The people's groans are loud and long ; 
Ar<-use, ye men, in every station, 

And join to crush the power of wrong. 
March on! march on. &c. 

Fight on! fight on, ye brave, till victory's y° r 

And justice shall prevail ; 
Till all shall feel the rays of liberty's sun. 

Streaming o'er hill and dale. 
The tyrants know their guilt and tremble, 

The glowing light of truth they fear ; 
Then let them all their hosts assemble, 

And slavery's dreadful sentence hear. 
Fight on ! fight on, &c. 

Roll on! roll on, ye brave, the liberty car, 

Our country's name to save ; 
Soon shall our land be known to nations afar, 

As the home of the free and brave. 
The voice of free men loud hath spoken, 

A brighter day we soon shall see ; 
When Slavery's chains shall all be broken, 

And all the captive millions free. 
Roll on ! roll on. &c 



THE EMBLEM OF THE FREE. 
Air — " 'TVs dawn, the lark is singing," page 

Our emblem is the Cedar, 
That knoweth not decay ; 

Its growth shall bless the mountains 
Till mountains pass away. 

Its top shall greet the sunshine — 
Its leaves shall drink the rain ; 

And on its lower branches, 

The slave shall hang his chain. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 307 



God bless the people's party — 

The party of the free, 
And give it faith and courage 

To strike for Liberty. 

This party — we will name it 

The Party or the Whole ! — 
Hath for its firm foundation, 
The substance of the Soul. 

It groweth out of reason, 

The strongest soil on earth ; 

How glorious is the promise 
Of Him who gave it birth ! 

Of what is true and living 

God makes himself the nurse ; 

While " ONWARD !" cry the voices 
Of all His Universe. 



ECHO FROM THE ROCKS OF MAINE. 

Air — " Auld Lang Syne" page 

Hurrah to the note that rising swells 

From lake to rolling sea ! 
Of truth and victory it tells — 
r Iis the watchword of the Free 

That watchword comes o'er hill and plain, 

From western lands afar ; 
Oui ocean waves repeat the strain- 
Hurrah ! hurrah ' hurrah ! 

The star our fathers watched of yore, 

To o;uide their steps aright, 
Though long bedimm'd, displays once more 
Its rays of peerless light. 

It shines on many a hill and plain 

Of Western lands afar ; 
It gleams upon the rocks of Maine — 
Huzza ! huzza ! huzza ! 

And runnier climes the anthem spread 

O : or their time-honored graves, 
To loll us Freedom's light is shed, 
Eon on a land of slaves. 

The free notes from fair Kansas' plain, 

Where sinks the evening star, 
Is echoing from the rocks of Maine, 
Hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah ! 



308 HARP OF FREEDOM. 

Hail to the tillers of the land, 

Whose brave hearts beating free, 
Disdain with fettered slaves to stand, 
And bend the suppliant knee. 

Their watchword from fair Kansas' plain, 

Borne on the breeze afar, 
Is echoing from the rocks of Maine, 
Huzza ! huzza ! huzza ! 

We vow by all the rights of toil , 
And by our fathers' graves, 
The air that floats o'er Freedom's soil, 
Shall not be breathed by slaves ! 

Our free note from fair Kansas' plain, 

Where sets the western star, 
Is echoing from the rocks of Maine- 
Hurrah ! hurrah ! hurrah ! 



YE SONS OF THE SOIL! 

Air — " Campbells are coming" page 

Ye sons of the soil, where for freedom your sires 
Struck the sparks from the flint to enkindle its fires, 
Shall the demon of Slavery now rule with a rod, 
The soil that was wet with your forefathers' blood 1 
Chorus. — From the shores of Atlantic e'en to the far West, 
Where'er beats a heart in a true freeman's breast, 
From hill-top and mountain to valley below, 
Let the answer be echoed in thunder-tones — " No !" 

Then, freemen, arouse and go forth in your might, 
United and firm for the truth and the right ; 
With the right on our side and the power in our hand, 
Shall oppression be suffered to stalk through the land 1 
Chorus — From the shores of Atlantic, &c. 

In the conflict with slavery, shall freedom succumb, 
And the priests of her altar be silent and dumb 1 
Shall the sons of the pilgrim bow down with dismay, 
And cravenly cower beneath slaveholding sway 1 
Chorus. — From the shores of Atlantic, &c. 

Huzza for Free Soil ! Free Soil evermore, 
Till its boundaries embrace on our land every shore ; 
And should traitors essay the foul curse to extend, 
Shall it any less speedily come to its end ? 
Chorus. — From the shores of Atlantic, &c. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 309 



UP, LAGGARDS OF FREEDOM. 

BY WHITTIER. 

Tune — " Campbells are Coming" 

Whoso loves not his kind, and fears not the Lord, 
Let him join that foe's service, accurs'd and abhorr'd ! 
Let him do his base will, as the slave only can — 
Let him put on the bloodhound, and put off the Man ! 

Let him go where the cold blood that creeps in his veins 
Shall stiffen the slave- whip, and rust on his chains — 
Where the black slave shall laugh in his bonds, to behold 
The white slave beside him, self-fettered and sold ! 

But ye, who still boast of hearts beating and warm, 
Rise, from lake, shore, and ocean, like waves in a storm I 
Come, throng round our banner in Liberty's name, 
Like winds from your mountains, like prairies a-flame I 

Our foe, hidden long in his ambush of night, 

Now, forced from his covert, stands black in the light. 

Oh, the cruel to Man, and the hateful to God, 

Smite him down to the earth, that is curs'd where he trod ! 

For deeper than thunder of Summer's loud shower, 
On the dome of the sky God is striking the hour ! 
Shall we falter before what we've prayed for so long, 
When the Wrong is so weak, and the Right is so strong 1 

Come forth, altogether ! — come old and come young — 
Freedom's vote in each hand, and her song on each tongue ; 
Truth naked is stronger than Falsehood in mail — 
The Wrong cannot prosper, the Right cannot fail ! 

Like leaves of the Summer once numbered the foe, 
But the hoar-frost is falling, the Northern winds blow ; 
Like leaves of November, ere long shall they fall, 
For Earth wearies of them, and God's over all ! 



THE GATHERING. 

Tune — "Hunter's Chorus. 

From hill and from valley 
They eagerly sally, 
Like billows of Ocean, 
The Mass is in motion — 
The lines are extending 
O'er mountain and plain ; 



810 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



Like torrents descending, 

They hurry amain. 
The Gathering ! The Gathering ! 

We'll be there ! we'll be there ! 
The Gathering ! The Gathering ! 

We'll be there ! we'll be there ! 
There ! there ! there ! 

Each eye flashes brightly, 
Each bosom beats lightly — 
The banners are glancing, 
And merrily dancing, 
While proudly the standard 

Of Liberty floats, 
And the music is swelling 

Inspiring notes. 
The Victory ! The Victory ! 

That we'll «;ain ! that we'll gain ! 
The Victory ! The Victory ! 

That we'll gain ! that we'll gain ! 
Gain ! gain ! gain ! 

Again we assemble — 
The traitor shall tremble! 
For strong as the ocean, 
A people in motion ! 
Thk Ides of November, 

The day of his doom, 
He long shall remember 

In silence and gloom. 
He long shall remember 

In .silence and gloom. 
The Traitor ! The Traitor ! 

He shall fall ! he shall fall ! 
The Traitor ! The Traitor ! 

He shall fall ! he shall fall \ 
Fall! Fall! FALL! 



THE NEB-RASCALITY. 

Sung to the air of "Dandy Jim."* 

1. Kind friends, with your permission, I 
Will sing a few short stanzas, 
About this new " Nebraska Bill," 
Including also Kansas ; 

* This may be sung to the air as indicated, or to the tune of Yankee Doodle 
throughout. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 31 j 



All how they had it " cut and dried," 
To rush it through the Senate 

Before the people rallied, and 
Before they'd time to mend it. 

Air — "Yankee Doodle." 

2. Iniquity so very great, 

Of justice so defiant, 
Of course could only emanate 

From brain of mighty giant 
This giant now is very small, 

As all of you do know, sirs, 
But then there is no doubt at all 

That he expects to grow, sirs. 

8. There's one thing more I ought to say, 
And that will make us even ; 
It is to mention by the way, 

The giant's name is Stephen. 

« i { "Fe, fi, fo, fe, fi, fum, 

I smell the blood of free-dom ; 
Fe, fi, fo fe, fi, fum, 

Dead or alive, I'll have some." 

4. Oh, terribly the giant swore, 

With awful oaths and curses, 
And language such as I cannot 

Engraft into my verses. 
There was a giant once before, 

And with a sling they slew him ; 
That Stephen could be slued with one, 

No one would say who knew him. 

Air — "Burial of Sir John Moore." 

5. 'Twas at the dead of night they met, 

(So I'm informed the case is,) 
Stephen in person leading on 

The army of ;< dough-faces." 
They voted, at the dead of night, 

While all the land lay sleeping, 
That all our sacred, blood-bought rights, 

Were not worth the keeping. 

Air — "Yankee Doodle, Double Quick Time. 

6. Oh ! bless those old forefathers, in 

Their Continental " trowsers," 
Who in their wisdom looked so far, 
And organized two houses — 



312 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



So let them shout, their time is short, 
They'll very soon be stiller ; 

For in the house they'll find a boy 
Called " Jack the Giant Killer." 

Air — "Scott's wha' ha' wV Wallace bled.' 

And now, kind friends, for once and all, 

Let's swear upon the altar 
Of plighted faith and sacred truth, 

To fight and never falter — 
That Liberty and Human Rights 

Shall be a bright reality, 
And we'll resist with all our might 

This monstrous Neb-rascality ! 



STRIKE FOR FREEDOM AND FOR RIGHT. 

Tune — "Dan Tucker" — slow and grave. 

From the bloody plains of Kansas, 
From the Senate's guilty floor, 

From the smoking wreck of Lawrence. 
From our Sumner's wounds and gore, 

Comes our country's dying call — 

Rise for Freedom, or we fall ! [Repeat .] 

Hear ye not succeeding ages 

From their cloudy distance cry 1 

See ye not the hands of nations 

Lifted toward the threatening sky ? 

Now, or never , rise and gain 

Freedom for this fair domain ! 

We have vanquished foreign tyrants — 
Now the battle draws a-near ; 

Let not Despots have this boasting, 
That a Freeman knows to fear. 

By your Father's patriot graves, 

Rise ! nor be forever slaves ! 

Speak, ye Orators of Freedom — 

Let your thunder shake these plains ; 

Write, ye Editors of Freedom — 

Let your lightning rive their chains. 

Up ! ye sons of Pilgrims, rise ! 

Strike for Freedom, or she dies ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 313 



Give this land to future ages 

Free, as God has made it free ; 

Swear, that not another acre 
Shall be cursed with Slavery ; 

Strike for freedom and for right — 

God himself is Freedom's might. 



" THE DAY BREAKETH." 

Tune—" Bavaria^— Page 200. 

On the earth the day is dawning ; 

Lovely beams a rising star ; 
Prisoner, greet a glorious morning — 

Hail the day-spring from afar ! 

Tyrants now are seized with trembling, 
While they madly urge the war; 

Dark and serried hosts assembling, 
blindly drag their bloody car. 

lis their last, their fated hour, 

For their reign of blood shall cease ; 

Sink.3 and dies their waving power — 
Soon shall reign the King of peace. 

Ho ! ye royal hosts of Freedom — 
Strong of heart, and truly brave ; 

See your brethren, chained and bleeding — 
Fly on lightning's wing to save ! 

Grasp the bolt of slavery's thunder — 

Hurl them back along the sky : 
Break their bars and bolts asunder — 

Boldly do, or bravely die ! 

On the earth the light is dawning ; 

Lovely beams the rising sun ; 
Prisoner, greet the glorious morning — 

Soon we'll shout, " The day is won !" 

Aspinwall, June 13, 1855. Horatio. 



tfE LONG TO SEE THAT HAPPY TIME. 

Tune— "Hebron." 

We long to see that happy time, 
That dear, expected, blissful day, 

When countless myriads of our race 
The glorious gospel shall obey. 



814 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



The prophecies must be fulfilled, 

Though earth and hell should dare oppose ; 
The stone cut from the mountain's side, 

Though unobserv'd, to empire grows. 

Afric's emancipated sons 

Shall shout to Asia's rapturing song — 
Europe resound her Saviour's iame, 

ADd western climes the notes prolong. 

From east to west, from north to south, 

Immanuel's kingdom must extend ; 
And every man, in every face, 

Shall meet a brother and a friend ! 



' 



\ 



PRAISE TO GOD WHO EVER REIGNS. 

Tune— "Pleyel." 

Praise to God who ever reigns — 
Praise to Him who burst our chains ; 
For the prkeless blessing giv'n, 
Thanks, our grateful thanks, to Heaven ! 

Here no more the bloody scourge 
Afric's fainting sons shall urge ; 
Here no more shall galling chains 
Wear our flesh with fest'ring pains. 

Here no more the frantic slave 
Fly for refuge to the grave : 
Freedom comes to banish fear — 
Hallelujah! God is here 

Long and loud with praises fill 
Deepest glen and highest hill ; 
Mountain peak and sea-girt shore 
Echo slavery's reign is o'er. 

Kindred — country now wc claim, 
Praise to God's beloved name ; 
Father, for this jubilee, 
Thanks, eternal thanks, to Thee ! 



HARP OP FREEDOM. 315 



THE TRUE ARISTOCRATS. 
Tune — " Auld Lang Syne." 

BY C. D. STUAKT. 

Who are the Nobles of the earth — 

The true Aristocrats, — 
Who need not bow their heads to Lords, 

Nor doff to Kings their hats ^ 
Who are they but the Men of Toil, 

The mighty and the free, 
Whose hearts and hands subdue the earth, 

And compass all the sea ! 

Who are they but the Men of Toil 

Who cleave the forests down, 
And plant amid the wilderness 

The hamlet and the town % 
Who fight the battles, bear the scars, 

And give the world its crown 
Of Dame, and fame, and history, 

And pomp of old renown ! 

These claim no gaud of heraldry, 

And scorn the knighting rod ; 
Their coats of arms are noble deeds ; 

Their peerage is from God ! 
They take not from ancestral graves 

The glory of their name, 
But win, as erst their fathers won, 

The laurel wreath of Fame. 



SLAVERY IS A HARD FOE TO BATTLE. 

BY JUDSON HUTCHINSON. 

Tune — " Jordan is a hard road to travel." 

I looked to the South, and I looked to the West, 

And I saw old Slavery a coming, 

With four Northern doughfaces hitched up in front, 

Driving freedom to the other side of Jordan. 

Then take off your coats and roll up your sleeves, 
Slavery is a hard foe to battle I believe. 

Slavery and Freedom they both had a fight, 
And the whole North came up behind 'em ; 
Hit Slavery a few knocks with a free ballot-box, 
Sent it staggering to the other side of Jordan. 

Then rouse up the North, the sword unsheath, 
Slavery is a hard foe to battle I believe 



316 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



If I was the Legislature of these United States, 

I'd settle this great question accordin'; 

I'd let every Slave go free over land, and on the sea, 

And let them have a little hope this side of Jordan. 
Then rouse up the free, the sword unsheath, 
Freedom is the best road to travel I believe. 

The South have their school where the masters learn to rule, 
And they lord it o'er the free states accordin'; 
But sure they'd better quit e'er they raise the Yankee grit, 
And we tumble 'em over 'tother side of Jordan. 

Then wake up the North, the sword unsheath, 

Slavery is a hard foe to battle I believe. 

But the day is drawing nigh that Slavery must die, 

And every one must do his part accordin'; 

Then let us all unite to give every man his right, {woman too .') 

And we'll get our pay the other side of Jordan. 
Then wake up the North, the sword unsheath, 
Freedom is the best road to travel I believe. 



DOWN WITH SLAVERY'S MINIONS. 

BY E. W. LOCKE. 

Air—" Old Dan Tucker," page 169. 

Rouse ye, freemen, from your slumbers ; 

Seize your arms and count your numbers ; 

Now's the time for deeds of bravery, 

Freedom grapples now with Slavery. 
Chorus. — Down with Douglas, Pierce and Shannon, 
Down with Slavery and Buchanan ! 
Freedom's traitors — sing their dirges, 
Long and loud as ocean surges. 

In the halls of Congress pleading, 
On the fields of Kansas bleeding, 
Brothers true as steel implore us — 
" Join the fight and join the chorus !" 
Chorus. — Down with Douglas, Pierce, &c, 

Mark the flag of Slavery's minions — 
" Bludgeons versus Free Opinions !" 
"Rule or Ruin !" " Compacts broken I" 
" Choke Free Words, before they're spoken !" 
Chorus. — Down with Douglas, Pierce, &c. 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 317 



Are we cowards now to falter 1 
Have we naught for Freedom's altar ] 
Shall our forces, by division, 
Reap defeat and bold derision 1 
Never ! never ! all are ready ! 
Every column marching steady : 
True as were our sires before us, 
Marching steady to the chorus ! 

Chorus. — Down with Douglas, Pierce, &c. 



TO THE RESCUE ! 

Music and Chorus, pp. 289, or " Rory O'More." 

They come from the mountain, they come from the glen, 
Their motto — " Free Labor, Free Soil, and Free Men ;" 
They sweep to the rally like clouds to the storm, 
From hill-top and valley they gather and form. 
They cry, " To the rescue !" their march is begun, 
Their number is legion — their hearts are but one ; 
Their cause is their country, they war for the right, 
And the minions of slavery turn pale at the sight. 

At the voice of Jehovah the ocean waves stayed — 
Its billows rolled back, and the mandate obeyed ; 
Thus the tyrant is checked — he beholds with surprise 
The slave power recoil when stern freemen arise. 
They speak — and that voice shall awaken mankind 
From the sleep that has rested so long on the mind ; 
" No party shall bind us — we are free from this hour; 
We bow not in meekness to slaveholding power." 



IFRICA'S CHILDREN, AWAKE FROM YOUR SADNESS! 

Africa's children, awake from your sadness ! 

Awake ! for your foes shall oppress you no more ; 
Bright o'er the hills dawns the day star of gladness ; 

Arise ! for your sorrow it soon shall be o'er. 

Strong are your foes, but an arm shall subdue them, 
And scatter their legions, that's mightier far ; 

They fly like the chaff from the scourge that pursues them, 
Vain are their steeds and their chariots of war. 

Africa's children, the power that will save you, 
Extolled with the harp and the timbrel should be ; 

Shout ! for the foe he'll destroy that enslaves you, 
The oppressor he'll vanquish, your children he ; U free. 



318 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



" LORD, WHOSE FORMING HAND." (L. M,) 

Lord ! whose forming hand one blood 
To all the tribes and nations gave, 

And giv'st to all their daily food, 
Look down in pity on the slave ! 

Fetters and chains and stripes remove, 
And freedom to their bodies give ; 

And pour the tide of light and love 
Upon their souls, and bid them live. 

Oh, kindle in our hearts a flame 

Of zeal, thy holy will to do ; 
And bid each child who loves thy name, 

To love his bleeding brother too. 

Through all thy temples, let the stain 

Of prejudice each bosom flee; 
And hand in hand, let Afric's train, 

With Europe's children, worship thee. 



WHAT MEAN YE 1 
Air — " Ortonville." 

What mean ye that ye bruise and bind 

My people 1 saith the Lord, 
And starve your craving brother's mind, 

Who asks to hear my word'* 

What mean ye that ye make them toil, 
Through long and dreary years, 

And shed like rain upon your soil 
Their blood and bitter tears 1 

What mean ye, that ye dare to rend 

The tender mother's heart 1 
Brothers from sisters, friend from friend, 

How dare you bid them part 1 

What mean ye when God's bounteous hand, 

To you so much has given, 
That from the slave who tills your land, 

Ye keep both earth and heaven 1 

When at the judgment God shall call, 

Where is thy brother 1 say, 
What mean ye to the Judge of all 

To answer on that day 1 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 31* 



WHO ARE THE FREE? (L. M.) 

Who are the free ? The sons of God, 
That hate oppression, strife, and blood ; 
Who are the slaves 1 The men that sell 
God's image for the gains of hell ! 

They scourge the frame, the sinews bind ; 
They trample on th' immortal mind : 
Earth can endure the guilt no more, 
And God rolls on th' avenging hour. 

Proclaim his truth, spread forth his laws ; 
Strike at the sin his soul abhors : 
Break every yoke, the slave release, 
Let chains, and stripes, and bondage cease. 

Thus shall the world resemble heaven ; 
Oppression back to hell be driven ; 
And Love shall bind, in sweet accord, 
All nations, ransomed of the Lord ! 



A SOUND TO ARMS. 

Air — " Sparkling and Bright." 

A sound of arms, and of war's alarms, 

Each breath from the South is bringing ; 
'Tis the charging van of oppression's clan, 
To the breeze their dark flag flinging 
Chorus. — Then rise, brothers, all, at duty's call, 
Beat back our fierce assaulters, 
And strike with might, for God and the right, 
And the fires of freedom's altars ! 

Our brothers bold in the prairies cold, 

In bloody shrouds are lying, 
And their wives on high send the piercing cry, 

And from burning homes are flying. 
Chorus — Then rise, brothers, all, at duty's call, &c. 

A noble hero is bleeding now, 

In the halls of the nation falling ; 
And his crimson gore as it stains the floor, 

Is for vengeance loudly calling. 
Chorus — Then rise, brothers, all, at duty's call, &c. 

Then on let us go to meet the foe, 

Though above us the thunder rattles, 
We stake our life, in the holy strife, 

With our trust in the God of battles. 
Chorus — Then rise, one and all, &c. 



320 HARP OF FREEDOM. 

HYMN FOR CHILDREN. 

Air — " Miss Lucy Long.'' 1 

BY W. S. ABBOTT. 

While we are happy here, 
In joy and peace and love, 

We'll raise our hearts with holy fear 
To thee, great God, above. 

God of our infant hours ! 

The music of our tongues, 
The worship of our nobler powers, 

To thee, to thee belongs. 

The little trembling slave 
Shall feel our sympathy ; 

God ! arise with might to save 
And set the captive free. 

No parent's holy care 
Provides for him repose, 

But oft the hot and briny tear, 
ha sorrow freely flows. 

The God of Abraham praise j 
The curse he will remove ; 

The slave shall welcome happy days, 
With liberty and love. 

Pray without ceasing, pray, 
Ye saints of God Most High, 

That all who hail this glorious day, 
May have their liberty. 



RALLYING SONG. 

Tune — The Marseilles Hymn, (page 158.) 

Behold ! the furious storm is rolling, 

Which Border- Fiends, confederates, raise! 
The Dogs of War, let loose, are howling, 

And, 16 ! our infant cities blaze ! 
And shall we calmly view the ruin, 
While lawless Force, with giant stride, 
Spreads desolation far and wide, 
In guiltless blood his hands imbruing 1 
Arise, arise, ye brave ! 

And let our war-cry be, 
Free Speech, Free Press, Free Soil, Free Men, 
A glorious Victory ! 



HARP OF FREEDOM. 321 



Oh ! Liberty ! can he resign thee, 

Who once has felt thy generous flame 1 
Can threats subdue, or bolts confine thee, — 

Or whips thy noble spirit tame 1 
No ! by the heavens bright bending o'er us ! 
We've called our Captain to the van — 
Behold the hour — behold the man ! 
Oh, wise and valiant, go before us ! 
Then let the shout again 

Ring out from sea to sea, 
Free Speech, Free Press, Free Soil, Free Men, 
Our country shall be free. 

Hurrah ! hurrah ! from hill and valley, 
Hurrah ! from prairie wide and free ! 
Around our glorious Chieftain rally, 

For Kansas and for Librrty ! 
Let him, who first her wilds exploring, 
Her virgin beauty save to fame, 
Nor save her from the curse and shame 
Which Slavery o'er her soil is pouring. 
Arise, arise, ye brave ! 

And let our war-cry be, 
Free Speech, Free Press, Free Soil, Free Men, 
A glorious Victory ! 



WE'RE FREE. 

BY JOHN G. WHITTIER. 

Tune — " Lucy Neal" page 212. 

The robber o'er the praire stalks, 

And calls the land his own ; 
And they who talk as Slavery talks, 

Are free to talk alone. 
Chorus — But tell the knaves we are not slaves, 
And slaves we ne'er will be ; 
Come weal or woe. the world shall know, 
We're free, we're free, we're free ! 

Oh, watcher on the outer wall, 

How wears the night away 1 
"I hear the birds of morning call, 

I see the break of day !" 
Chorus — Rise, tell the knaves we are not slaves, 
And slaves we ne'er will be, &c. 



322 HARP OF FREEDOM. 



The hands that hold the sword and purse 

Ere long shall lose their prey ; 
And they who blindly wrought the curse, 

The curse shall sweep away. 
Chorus — Then tell the knaves we are not slaves, 
And slaves we ne'er will be &c. 

The land again in peace shall rest, 

With blood no longer stained : 
The virgin beauty of the West, 

Shall be no more profaned. 
Chorus — We'll teach the knaves we are not slaves, &c, 

Then lot the idlers stand apart, 

And cowards shun the fight, 
We'll band together, heart to heart, 

Forget, forgive, unite. 
Chorus — And tell the knaves we are not slaves, &c. 



FREEDOM. 

BY BRYANT. 

Free soil, free men, 

Free speech, free pen, 
Freedom from slavery's thrall ; 

Free North, free East, 

Free South, free West, 
Freedom for one and all ! 

Free ports, free seas, 

Free ships, free breeze, 
Free homesteads for the people ; 
Free bells on every steeple, 

Free pulpits and free preachers ; 

(Three cheers for all the Bekchkrs : 
Freedom from Southern rooks ; 
Freedom from Southern " Brooks;" 

Free schools, free books ; 

Freedom to worship God. 
Freedom to read His Word ; 

Freedom's star-spangled banners 

Waving o'er gallant Kansas ; 
Freedom from Border Smugglers, 
(Three Groans for Pierce and Douglas ?) 
Freemen to bear the battle-brunt, 
And, rushing to the battle-front, 
The hords of Slavery to confront, 
For Freedom and for Union shout. 



A CLOUD OF WITNESSES. 



Nature — Justice — The Bible — The Testament — The Common 
Law — The Declaration of Independence — The Constitution of 
the United States — The greatest Philosophers — The greatest Judges 
— The greatest Divines — and the greatest Statesmen of the World, 
Against Slavery. 

Let these great, Eternal, and Fundamental principles of Liberty, Equality 
and Law, be carefully read and pondered by us, and faithfully inculcated in the 
minds of our children. Nothing will tend more surely to the overthrow of 
Slavery, and the establishment of Freedom on a firm basis, and the recogni- 
tion and enactment of just and righteous laws for the government of the Na- 
tion, and the protection of the rights of the people. 



" It is neither for the good, nor is it just, seeing all men are by nature 
alike., and Equal, that one should be Lord and Master over others." — Ari- 
stotle. 

"Slavery is contrary to the fundamental principles of all Societies." — Mon- 

TISQUEN. 

" By the grand Laws of Nature, all men are born free, and this law is uni- 
versally binding upon all men." — " Eternal justice is the basis of all human 
laws." — " Those who have made pernicious and unjust decrees, have made any- 
thing rather than Laws." — Cicero. 

" Slavery is a System of the most complete injustice." — Plato. 

" AU men are by nature free bornP — Louis 10th. 

" Even the earth itself, which teems with profusion under the cultivating 
hand of the free born laborer, shrinks into barrenness from the contaminating 
sweat of a Slave." — Mosttesquen. 

" Nothing puts one nearer the condition of a brute than always to see free- 
men and not be free." — Montesquen. 

" Slavery is a system of outrage and robbery." — Socrates. 

11 Tojight, in order not to be made a slave, is noble." — Cyrus. 

The great Tacitus declared, after the introduction of slavery into Rome — "The 
whole state of our affairs was turned upside down — nothing of the ancient in- 
tegrity of our Fathers was left amongst us ; all men cast away that former 
equality which had be N n observed." 



324 A CLOUD OF WITNESSES. 



" None but unprincipled and beastly men in Society assume the mastery over 
their fellows, as is among Bulls, Bears, and Cocks." — Plato. 

"Law, is not something wrought out by man's ingenuity, nor is it a decree of 
the people, but it is something eternal, governing the world by the wisdom of its 
commands and prohibitions." — Cicero. 

" Any act of Parliament made against natural equity, is void, for the Law 
of Nature is immutable." — Judge Hobert. 

" What the Parliament dotb, shall be holden for naught, whenever it shall 
enact that which is contrary to the rights of Nature. ." — Lord Coke. 

" The essence of all law is Justice. What is not just is not law ; and what 
is not law, ought not to be obeyed." — Hampden. 

" The precepts of law are, to live honestly, to hurt no one, to give to every one 
his due." — Justinian and Blackstone. 

" Justice is the basis of all Societies''' 1 — Vattel. 

" No law but that of justice should either be proclaimed as a law, or enforced 
as a law." — Quintus. 

" All men naturally, are equal; for though nature with a noble variety has 
made different features and lineaments of men, yet as to freedom, she has made 
every one alike, and given them the same desires." — Harrington. 

" Though the earth, and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every 
man has a property in his own person ; this, nobody has any right to but him- 
self" — Locke. 

" To secure to the citizens the benefits of an honest and happy life, is the 
grand object of all political associations." — Cicero. 

" Justice is the end of Government. It is the end of civil Society." — Feder- 
alist. 

"Whatever is just is also the true Law, nor can this true law be abrogated 
by any written enactments," — Cicero. 

" The law of nature, being coeval with mankind, and dictated by God himself, 
is, of course, superior in obligation to any otber. It is binding all over the globe, 
in all countries, - and at all times. No human laws have any validity, if con- 
trary to this, and such of them as are valid, derive all their force, mediately or 
immediately from this Original." — Forte scue. 

" Of law, nothing less can be acknowledged than that her seat is the bosom 
of God, her voice the harmony of the world. All things in Heaven and earth 
do her homage ; the least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempt 
from her power." — Hooker. 

" That is just which doth destroy tyrannical government ; that is unjust which 
would abolish just government." — Chancellor Somers. 

" The reasonableness of law is the soul of law." — Noyes. 

" Human laws must be made according to the general laws of nature." " No 
human laws are binding, if contrary to the laws of nature." — Hooker. 

" To establish justice, must forever be one of the greatest ends of every wise 
government ; it lies at the very basis of all institutions." — Story. 

" Statutes against fundamental morality are void." — Judge McLean. 



A CLOUD OF WITNESSES. 325 



THE OLD TESTAMENT. 

" He that stealeth a man and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he 
shall surely be put to death." — Moses. 

"Thou shalt not wrest judgment ; thou shalt not respect persons." — JDeut' 
16: 19. 

" Execute judgment (i. e. justice) between a man and his neighbor." — Jere- 
miah 7:5. 

" Execute judgment in the morning, and deliver him that is spoiled out of 
the hand of the oppressor." — 21 : 12. 

" That which is altogether just shalt thou follow." — Dent. 16 : 20. 

" And thev (the judges) shall judge the people with just judgment." — JDeut. 
16: 18. 

"Hear the causes between your brethren, and judge righteously between 
every man and his brother, and the stranger that is with him." — Deut. 1 : 16. 

" If there be a controversy between men and they come into judgment that 
the judges may judge them, then they shall justify the righteous, and condemn 
the wicked."— Beat. 25 : 1. 

"In righteousness shalt thou judge thy neighbor." — Lev. 19 : 15. 

" Ye shall not oppress one another: 1 — Lev. 25 : 17 

" Proclaim Liberty throughout all the Land unto all the inhabitants thereof." 
—lb. 

THE NEW TESTAMENT. 

" All things whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, do ye even 
yo to them; for this is the law and the prophets." — "All ye are brethren" — 
" call no man master, neither be ye called masters" "Ye know that they 
which are accounted to rule over the gentiles exercise lordship over them ; and 
their great ones exercise authority over them ; but so it should not be among 
you" "Be not like the Scribes and Pharisees." " They bind heavy burdens 
and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men's shoulders, while they them- 
selves will not move them with one of their fingers." " They make long 
prayers 1 ' — " Devour widows houses" — " are full of extortions and excesses" — 
" whited sepulchres, beautiful without, but within are full of dead men's bones, and 
all uncleanness." — " Be kindly affectioned one towards another, in brotherly 
love, preferring one another."—" Do good to all men as ye have opportunity." 
" Let your light so shine before men, that they may see jour good works and 
glorify your Father which is in heaven."—" Do all to the glory of God whatever 
you do." — "If thou mayest be free, use it rather," — "Not now as a servant, 
but above a servant, a brother beloved.'" — " The law was made for man stealers." 

" God hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face 
of the earth." 

" Render to every man that which is just. ,'' 



326 A CLOUD OF WITNESSES. 



r "Not only does the Christian religion, but nature herself cry out against the 
state of Slavery." — Leo X. 

" As all men are by nature free born, and as this kingdom is called the king- 
dom of Franks, (freemen) it shall be so in reality. It is therefore decreed that 
enfranchisement shall be granted throughout the whole kingdom upon just and 
reasonable terms." — Louis X. 

" Every man is born with a right to Freedom, which no other man has a 
power over." — Locke. 

" The law of all nations forbids one man to pursue his advantage at the ex- 
pense of another." — Cicero. 

"Those are not Societies, whose supreme law is not justice, they are only 
magna latrocinia, great confederacies of thieves or robbers. Society cannot 
consist without justice."— Augustine. 

" You, man of a day, expect from your slave obedience. Is he less a man 
than you 1 By birth he is your equal. He is endowed with the same organs, the 
same reasoning soul — the same hopes, subject to the same laws of life in this, 
and in the world to come. Impious master ! Pitiless despot ! You spare 
neither whips nor blows, nor privations : you chastise with hunger and thirst, 
you load with chains ; you incarcerate him within black walls ; miserable man ! 
While you thus maintain your despotism over a man, you are not willing to re- 
cognize the Master and Lord of all men."— St. Cyprian. 

" Both religion and humanity make it a duty for us to work for the deliver- 
ance of the captive. It is Christ himself whom we ought to consider in our cap- 
tive brothers." — St. Cyprian. 

The great Ecclesiastical Council held at Westminster 1102, forbid the " Sell- 
ing of men like cattle." 

In the same century, 1172, slavery was solemnly denounced by the great 
Irish Synod as u Contrary to the rights of Christian Freedom:' 1 

"It is justice which the free owe to those in bondage. Justice teaches men 
to know God and to love men, to love and assist one another, being all equally 
the children of God."-- -Lactantius. 

Cesarius, in the 6th century, stripped the church of its sacred vessels and all 
its silver ornaments, for the freedom of slaves — saying-—" Our Lord celebrated 
his last supper in mean earthen dishes, not in plate, and we need not scruple to 
part with his vessels to ransom those he has redeemed with his life." 

" In temporal things, nothing is right or lawful, but that the people have de- 
rived to themselves out of the law eternal" — St. Augustine. 

" The Oriental Christians declared themselves opposed to the whole relation 
of slavery as repugnant to the dignity of the image of God in all men." — Nean- 

DER. 

The Christians of Asia Minor denounced slaveholding " as a sin — a violation 
of the laws of nature and religion. They gave fugitive slaves asylum, and open- 
ly offered them protection." — Fletcher. 

" Unjust violence is, by no means, the ordinance of God, and therefore can 
bind no one in conscience and right, to obey, whether the command comes from 
Pope, Emperor, King or master."— Martin Luther. 



A CLOUD OF WITNESSES. 327 



,( Do not employ those beings created in the image of God, as slaves." — Sttt- 

DITA. 

" Let the gate of your palace be open to all, that every one may have re- 
course to you for justice. Employ your great resources in redeeming slaves." — 
Remigius. 

Augustine, Constantine, Ignatius, Polycarp, Maximius, denounced slavery 
and manumitted slaves. 

Men-buyers are exactly on a level with men-stealers" — John Wesley. 

" Those are men-stealers who abduct, keep, sell or buy slaves or freemen." — 
Grotius. 

" To hold a man in a state of slavery, is to be, every day guilty of robbing 
him of his liberty, or, of man-stealing. 1 ' 1 — President Edwards. 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE AND CONSTITUTION OF 
THE UNITED STATES. 

" We hold these truths to be self-evident — that all men are created Equal — 
with certain inalienable rights 1 — [' Inalienable] i. e. cannot be alienated; can- 
not, legally, be taken away] — among which are life, liberty, and the pursuit of 



We, the people of the United States : in order to form a more perfect Union, 
establish justice, ensure domestic tranquillity, and provide for the common de- 
fence, promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves 
and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States 
of America." * * * * '' No person shall be deprived of life, liberty or pro- 
perty without due process of law," ib — " Shall enjoy the right to a speedy and 
public trial by an impartial jury," ib — " The right of the people to be secure in 
their persons and property, shall not be violated." ib — "The citizens of each 
State shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of citizens in the several 
States, ib — " The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended 
in time of peace," — ib. [This writ, according to Blackstone, was designed to carry 
out, more perfectly, the provision of Magna Charta, that no man should be de- 
prived of liberty "unless it be by legal indictment, or the process of common 
law," which includes trial by jury.J " No bill of attainder, or expost facto law, 
shall be passed," ib — " The judicial power shall extend to all cases in law and 
equity," xb — " The United States shall guarantee to every State in the Union 
a Republican form of Government." — Cons. U S. 

" The foundation of republican government is the right of every citizen, in his 
person and property, and in their management."— Jefferson. 

" It is essential to a republican government that it be derived from the great 
body of society, not from an inconsiderable proportion, OR a favored class of 
it: } — Madison, in No. 39 of the Federalist. 

In the Virginia Convention that ratified the Constitution, Patrick Henry, a 
member of the Federal Convention, said that Congress, by the Constitution, had 
" power to pronounce all slaves free." " There is," said he, " no ambiguous im- 
plication or logical deduction. The paper speaks to the point. They have the 



328 A CLOUD OF WITNESSES. 



power in clear and unequivocal terms, and will clearly and certainly exer- 
cise it." 

Gov. Randolph said : " They insist that the abolition of slavery will result 
from this Constitution. I hope there is no one here who will advance an objec- 
tion so dishonorable to Virginia. I hope that at the moment they are securing 
the rights of their citizens, an objection will not be started that those unfortunate 
men now held in bondage by the operation of the General Government, 
may be made free." 

With this " understanding," the Constitution was ratified by Virginia. 

Gen. Wilson, another member of the Federal Convention, from Pennsylvania, 
assured the people of that State that the Constitution " laid a foundation for 
banishing slavery out of this country." 

The Constitution repudiates the revolting idea of "property inman.^ 
"The reserved rights of the State" include no such right as that of holding 
property in man, as no such "right" can exist. Mr. Madison tells us that the 
Federal Convention would not permit the Constitution to recognize any such 
right.— Vide Madison Papers. 

" The way, I hope, is preparing under the auspices of heaven for a total emanci- 
pation." — Jefferson. 

" It is among my first wishes to see some plan adopted, by which slavery in 
this country may be abolished by law."— Washington. 

" Slavery is a most blighting curse upon the Old Dominion ; and I know of 
but one way of getting rid of it— that is, by Legislative authority ; and so far 
as my vote shall go for that purpose, it shall never be wanting."— Washington. 

" There must, doubtless, be an unhappy influence on the manners of our people 
produced by the existence of slavery among us. The whole commerce between 
master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most 
unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other. 
Our children see this, and learn to imitate it ; for man is an imitative animal. 
This quality is the germ of all education in him. From the cradle to his grave 
he is learning to do what he sees others do. ****** * 
The parent storms, the child looks on, catches the lineaments of wrath, puts on 
the same airs in the circle of smaller slaves, gives a loose to the worst of passions, 
and thus nursed, educated, and daily exercised in tyranny, cannot but be stamped 
by it with odious peculiarities. The man must be a prodigy who can retain his 
manners and morals undepraved by such circumstances. 

" Thomas Jefferson, of Old Virginia." 

" We should transmit to posterity our abhorrence of slavery." — Patrick 
Henry. 

" Slavery is repugnant to the principles of Christianity ; it prostrates every 
benevolent and just principle of action in the human heart."— Richard Bush. 

" No man can lay his head in safety upon his pillow in the midst of slavery." — 
Jefferscn. 

" Slavery is a dark spot on the face of the nation." — Lafayette. 

" We should march up to the very verge of the Constitution to destroy the 
traffic in human flesh." — Franklin. 



A CLOUD OF WITNESSES. 329 



THE JEFFERSONIAN ORDINANCE, PASSED 1787. 

We quote the prohibitory section : (1) 

"Sec. 8. Be it further enacted, That in all that Territory ceded by France 
to the United States, under the name of Louisiana, which lies north of thirty- 
six degrees and thirty minutes of north latitude, not included within the limits 
of the State contemplated by this act, Slavery and involuntary servitude, 
otherwise than as the punishment of crimes, shall be and is hereby FOR- 
EVER PROHIBITED." 

"Wherever there is afoot of land to be stayed back from becoming slave 
territory, I am ready to assert the principle of the exclusion of slavery. 1 '— 
Webster. 

" And no earthly power ever will make me vote to spread slavery over terri- 
tory where it does not exist.''— Clay. 

Alas ! how has Slavery degraded and depraved the South. She has now come 
to advocate the monstrous doctrine that "Slavery is right," not only, but 
" natural and necessary ;" and, " that it does not depend upon difference of 
complexion." That the " laics of the slave States justify the holding of white 
men, as well as black men, in bondage." See Richmond Examiner, Charles- 
ton Mercury, and other Southern prints. 

" Vice is a monster of so hateful mein, 
That, to be hated, need but to be seen ; 
But, seen too oft, familiar with her face, 
We first endure, then pity, then embrace /" 

Just God ! and shall we calmly rest, 

The Christian's scorn— the heathen's mirth — 
Content to live the lingering jest 

And by- word of a mocking Earth 1 
Shall our own glorious land retain 

That curse which Europe scorns to bear 
Shall our own brethren drag the chain 

Which not even Russia's menials wear? 

Down let the shrine of Moloch sink, 

And leave no traces where it stoo 1 : 
No longer let its idol drink 

His daily cup of human blood ; 
But rear another altar there, 

To Truth, and Love, and Mercy given, 
And Freedom's gift, and Freedom's prayer, 

Shall call an answer down from heaven ! — Whittier. 



CONTENTS 



Acres and Hands— T. Wood 17 

Am I not a Man and Brother 1 — Bride's Farewell 97 

Am I not a Sister 1 " «' 98 

Are ye truly Free 1 — " Martyn." 156 

Arouse ! Arouse ! — " Be Free, Man, be Free !" — G. W. C 164 

Appeal to Woman — " Bavaria." 199 

Afric's Children Awake from Your Sadness — Hymn 317 

A Sound of Arms — " Sparkling and Bright." 319 

A Hymn for Children — "While we are happy here" — "Lucy Long." 320 

Bright is the Day Break—" Rory O'Moore." 289 

Better Times are Coming, Friends — Dumbleton , . . 27 

Be Free, Man, be Free !— G. W. C 163 

Break Every Yoke — " no, we never mention her." 175 

Bully Brooks— "Cork Leg." 64 

Brothers, be Brave — " Sparkling and Bright." 233 

Be Kind to Each Other— G. W. C 260 

Come Join the Friends of Liberty — " When I can read my title 

clear." 131 

Comfort the Bondman — " Indian Philosopher." 143 

Come and See the Works of God — " Indian Philosopher." 144 

Comfort in Affliction— If yon Bright Stars— G. W. C 214 

Come, Voters, Come — G. W. C 206 

Children of the Glorious Dead ! — "Scots wha ha." 277 

Come all ye Sons and Daughters — " Old Granite State." 304 

Day is Breaking— T. Wood 24 

Do Good, do Good— G. W. C 78 

Domestic Bliss — " Indian Maid." 232 

Down with Slavery's Minions — " Old Dan Tucker." 316 

Echo from the Rocks of Maine — " A.uld Lang Syne." 307 

Freedom's Glorious Day — " Crambambule." 171 

" Freedom, Honor and Native Land." 51 

Free Kansas— G. W. C 53 \ 

Fourth of July— G. W. C 125 V 

Friend of the Friendless—" The Mercy Seat." — G. W. C 138 

Fugitive's Triumph — Pax 191 

Freemen ! Tell us of the Night— " Watchman," &c ,. . . 197 



232 CONTENTS. 



Free Soil Chorus—" Auld Lang Syne." 293 

Freedom's Gathering— G. W. C. 258 

For the Election—" Scots wha ha," &c 301 

" Freedom"— Bryant 324 

God Speed the Right.. .* 44 

Get off the Track—" Dan Tucker." 169 

Gone— Sold and Gone— G. W. C 254 

Hurrah ! for our Cause — " Campbells are Coming." 282 

Help, helo, Thou God of Christians— G. W. C 192 

Harbinger of Liberty— G. W. C 173 Is* 

Hail, Columbia—" Hail, Columbia." 36 

Happy Days are Coming — " Few Days." 39 

Ho ! for Kansas !— " Nelly Bly." 59 

Heard ye that Cry !—" Wind of the Winter Night." 86 

Hark ! a Voice from Heaven — " Zion.". 145 

Holy Freedom—" Lutzow's Wild Hunt." 155 

How long, how long 1 — " Araby's Daughter." 66 

Hark ! I hear a Sound of Anguish — " Calvary." 236 

Hail the Day—" Wreath the Bowl"— "-Yankee Doodle." 300 

I Would not Live Alway — " I would not live alway." 100 

I Am Monarch of Naught I Survey—" Old De-Fleury." 240 

I Dream of All Things Free— G. W. C 209 

Light of Truth— G. W. C 174 

Liberty Battle Song— "Our Warriors' Heart." 272 

My Old Master Tells Me So.— Dandy Jim 33 

March to the Battle Field—" Oft in the stilly night.". 150 

Myron Holly — Hastings 120 

My Country — " God, save the King." 194 

My Child is Gone— G. W. C 221 

Manhood— "A Man's a Man for a' that.." 298 

March On ! March On !— '« Pirate's Glee." „ 306 

Never Give Up !— G. W. C 92 

Negro Boy Sold for a Watch—" Old air." 242 

O Lord, whose Forming Hand — Hymn. 318 

O Carry Me Back—" Old Virginnv." 295 

O ! When we go Back Dar— " Old'Carlina State." 54 

One Hundred Years Hence — G. W. C 31 

Our Countrymen in Chains — Hastings 119 

Our Pilgrim Fathers — " Minstrel Boy." 101 

Oft in the Chilly Night—" Oft in the stilly night." 152 

O Pitty the Slave Mother—" Araby's Daughter." 228 

Our Countrymen are Dying — " Greenland's Icy Mountains." 244 

O Charity 136 

Pilgrim Song— " Troubadour." 123 



CONTENTS. 233 



Prayer for the Slave—" Hamburg." 90 

Party of the Whole— Webb 274 

Praise to God Who Ever Reigns — " Pleyel." 314 

Rallying Song—" Marseilles." 320 

Rouse, Brothers, Rouse — " The flag of our Union for ever." 83 

Rouse up, New England— G. W. C Ill 

Remember God is just — "Hamburg." 91 

Rise, Freemen, Rise— G. W. C 114 

Remember Me— G. W. C 114 

Raise a Shout for Liberty—" Old Granite State." 189 

Right Onward we Go— G. W. C 280 

Slavery is a Hard Foe to Battle — " Jordan." 315 

Salt River Chorus — " Cheer up my lively lads." 278 

Sleep on, My Child—" Wind of the winter's night." 87 

Stanzas for The Times— G. W, C 104 

Sing Me a Triumph Song—" My faith looks up to Thee." 128 

Song of The Free—" Lutzow's Wild Hunt " 153 

Spirit of Freemen. Awake — " God save the King." 195 

Slaveholder's Lament — " Lucy Neal." 205 

Slave's Wrongs—" Rose of Allendale." 218 

Slave Girl Mourning her Father — Old Air 248 

Slave's Wail — " Over the Mountain, over the Moor." 107 

" Star Spangled Banner" — Robert Treat Paine 41 

Swanee River--" Old folks at Home." 295 

Slave's Address to the Eagle — " Carrier Dove." 297 

Strike for Freedom and for Right—*' Familiar Air." 312 

To One as Well as Another— G. W. C 75 

The Stolen Boy— Lover 69 

The Poor Unhappy Slave— Griffin 66 

The Breaking Dawn — Traver 9 

The Day Spring Bright—" Sparkling and Bright." 13 

The Day of Promise Comes — Hutchinsons* 14 

Till the Last Chain is Broken — " Last link is broken." 20 

This World is Not All Cheerless— G. W. C 26 

There's Room Enough for All— G. W. C 46 

The Joys of Freedom—" Polly Hopkins"— arranged and harmon- 
ized by G. W. C 57 

There's a Good Time Coming— Hutchinsons 72 

The Flag of Our Union For Ever — Wallace 80 

The Bereaved Mother — " Kathleen O'Moore." 84 

The Fugitive — Bonny Doon 95 

To Those I Love— Old Air. 109 

The Man for Me—" The Rose that all are praising." 121 

The Bondman— " Troubadour." 124 

The Law of Love— G. W. C 135 

The Mercy Seat— G. W. C 137 



234 CONTENTS. 

The Pleasant Land we Love — "Carrier Dove." 147 

The Freed Slave " " 149 

The Flag of the Free " " 149 >^ 

That's My Country— Martyn 157 

The Last Night of Slavery—" Cherokee Death Song." 165 

The Little Slave Girl — " Morgianainin Ireland." 167 

The Yankee Girl— G. W. C 177 

The Slave's Lamentation — " Long, long ago." 180 

The Poor Wayfairing Man of Grief. 182 

The Trembling Fugitive— G. W. C 193 

The Liberty Army — " God save the King " 195 

The Slave Singing at Midnight— German Air 196 

The Branded Hand— G. W. C 200 

The Negro Father's Lament — Wurzel 212 

The Poor Little Slave— G. W. C 215 

The Ballot Box—" Lincoln." 216 

The Blind Slave Boy—" Sweet Afton." 222 

The Strength of Tyranny—" Crackovienne." 227 

The Fugitive to the Christian " 225 

The Quadroon Maiden—" Indian Maid." 230 

The Voter's Song—" Niel Gow's farewell." 270 

The Afric's Dream — " Emigrant's Lament." 238 

The Negro's Appeal — "Isle of beauty." 246 

The Slave and Her Babe — "How can I sleep while angels sing'?" 251 

The Bereaved Father— G. W. C 250 

The Slave Boy's Wish—" Near the Lake." 253 

Tis a Glorious Year— Our Warriors' heart." 273 

The Clarion of Freedom—" The Chariot." 266 

The Liberty Ball—" Rosin the bow." 261 p 

The Free Soil Voter's Song— " Old Granite State." 288 

The Free State Debate " " " 285 

The Ballot—" Bonny Doon." 299 

The Poor Voter's Song—" Lucy Long." 297 

The Spirit of the Pilgrims—" Be free, O man, be free." 301 

They Worked Me all Day Without a Bit of Pay—" Dearest May." 296 

The Minstrel Boy—" The Minstrel Boy." 302 

The Slaveholder's Prayer — " Dandy Jim." 303 

The Emblem of the Free—" 'Tis dawn, the lark," &c 306 {S 

The Gathering—" Hunter's Chorus." 309 

The Nebrascality— " Yankee Doodle." : 310 

The Day Breaketh— " Bavaria." 313 

The True Aristocrats — " Auld Lang Syne." 315 

To the Rescue—" Rory O'Moore."." 317 

The Free Soiler's Song— "From Greenland's Icy Mountains."... 245 

The Home of the Free—" Rosin the bow." 262 

Uncle Tom's Religion — Howard 62 

Up, Laggards of Freedom — "Campbells are coming." 309 



CONTENTS. 335 



Voice of New England— G. W. C 117 

While 'tis Daytime, Let us Work— T. Wood, 49 

We're Free !— Whittier— " Lucy Neal." 321 

We've had a Cordial Greeting—" Old Granite State." 305 

We Long to See that Happy Day— "Hebron." 313 

Who are The Free 1— L. M 119 

We're Coming— Kinloch." 264 

Wake, Sons of the Pilgrims — "McGregor's Gathering." 129 

We are Come, All Come— Old Air." 134 

Wake, ye Numbers !— " Strike the Cymbals," 139 

We're for Freedom Thro' the Land—" Old Granite State." 185 

We're Children of One Parent — Mason 190 

Wake ye Freemen All — " Lucy Long." 268 

What Means that Sad and Dismal Look 1— " Near the Lake.". . . 252 

What's Holy Time— " Somerville." 203 

What Mean Ye ?— Hastings 318 

Ye Spirits of the Free—" My Faith looks up," &c 127 

Ye Heralds of Freedom— Kingsly 99 

Ye Sons of Freemen ,,, e . . 158 

Ye Sons of the Soil — " Campbells are Coming." 308 

Zaza— The Female Slave— G. W. C 88 



Appendix, page 323 to 329. 



THOUSANDS OF AGENTS 

"Wanted to Sell the following Popular Anti-Slavery 
Books. 

THE FREEMEN'S GLEE BOOK. A Collection of Songs, Odes, Glees, and 
Ballads, with Music arranged for each. Price 20 cents ; $12 per hundred. 
HE YOUNG AMERICAN'S LIFE OF FREMONT. By Fbancis C. Wood- 
woeth, the well-known writer for Youth. 264 pages 18mo, Steel Portrait and 
other Illustrations. Price 50 cents. 

THE REPUBLICAN PARTY AND ITS CANDIDATES, comprising the His- 
tory, Principles, and Purposes of the Republican Party of the United States, 
from the days of Thomas Jefferson to the present time ; with Biographical 
Sketches of Colonel John C. Fremont and "William L. Dayton. By Benjamin 
F. Hall, Esq. One volume, over 500 pages 12mo, with Portraits. Price $1. 

PETER STILL— THE KIDNAPPED AND THE RANSOMED, being tbe 
Personal Recollections of Peter Still and his Wife Vina, after Forty Years of 
Slavery, By Mrs. Kate E. R. Piokaed, with an Introduction by Rev. Samuel 
J. Mat, and an Appendix by Wm. H. Fubness, D.D. 400 pp. 12mo, 5 Illustra- 
tions. Price $1 25. 

MY BONDAGE AND MY FREEDOM. By Feedeeick Douglass, with an In- 
troduction by Dr. James McCune Smith. 12mo. Price $1 25. 

ARCHY MOORE, THE WHITE SLAVE, OR MEMOIRS OF A FUGITIVE. 
By Richaed Hildeeth. 12mo, 8 Illustrations. Price $1 25. 

TWELVE YEARS A SLAVE. The Narrative of Solomon Northup, a Citize* 
of New York, Kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and Rescued, in 1853, 
from a Cotton Plantation near Red River, in Louisiana. 7 Illustrations, 336 pp. 
12mo. Price $1. 

AMERICAN AGITATORS AND REFORMERS. By D. W. Baetlett. Con- 
taining bold, vigorous, and life-like Sketches of the Beechees, Mes. Stowe, 
Geeelet, Sewabd, Gough, Chapin, Feedeeick Douglass, &c, <kc., with ex- 
tracts from their writings. 6 Steel Portraits. 396 pp. 12mo. Price $1 25. 

OUR WORLD; OR, ANNETTE, THE SLAVEHOLDER'S DAUGHTER. Il- 
lustrated, 603 pp. 12mo. Price $1 25. 

ATROCIOUS JUDGES. LIVES OF JUDGES, INFAMOUS AS TOOLS OF 
TYRANNY AND INSTRUMENTS OF OPPRESSION. By John, Lobd 
Campbell, with an Appendix, containing the case of Passmore Williamson. 
Edited,. with an Introduction and Notes, by Richaed Hildeeth. 420 pp. 12mo. 
Price $1. 

THE REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN SONGSTER, Forty-five thousand already 
sold. Price 12£ cents ; $1 per dozen ; $7 per hundred ; $30 for five hundred. 
Single copies of the above mailed free, on receipt of retail price. 
For full particulars address 

MIILEB, ORTON & MUI^ICJAN, Publishers, 

25 Park Row, New York ; and 107 Genesee St., Auburn. 



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3 9999 06385 272 5